Shooting with a scope at various distances?

Discussion in 'Optics & Mounts' started by Mount_Sannine, Feb 25, 2010.

  1. Mount_Sannine

    Mount_Sannine New Member

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    Hello everyone,

    I'm new to scopes and I got a new one installed on my Diana 350 Magnum air rifle, the scope is 4x32. My problem is that I sighted the scope at 25 yards then 50 yards and I was hitting targets with it quite well, I tried it today at 100 and 150 yards by shooting at a pond of water (I purposely shot at water to easily find out where the pellet is hitting) and it turns out the pellet is going lower then the target.

    My question is, should the scope have a different vertical "tuning" for different distances? And if the answer is yes should I manually change the tuning every time I need to fire at something which is near or far?

    Thank you for your much appreciated help.
     
  2. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    First off, you really don't want to shoot at a body of water, regardless of where you are, what type of gun you're shooting, or any other circumstances!!!

    Secondly, you might just Google "Sighting in a rifle scope." You'll find lots of step-by-step instructions.
     

  3. Mount_Sannine

    Mount_Sannine New Member

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    Ok, but why?
     
  4. skullcrusher

    skullcrusher New Member

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    Shooting at a body of water in a horizontal fashion will cause the projectile to skip...kinda like skipping a stone. The projectile could possibly go somewhere you don't want it to go. Now, as long as the area beyond the body of water is free and clear and you know this for sure without a doubt...just safety first. Unless there is some other reason...

    Now as for sighting in at different distances. There are different schools of thought, but I like the method of sighting in at one distace to zero and then just finding out how hold over or under you need at a different distance. For instance, if you are zero at 50 yards but the projectile hits 4" low at 75 yards, you know you need to hold over 4" for shooting at 75 yards. This is where shooting at a target that shows evidence of the drop comes in handy.

    Now, knowing the basic ballistics of what you are shooting helps. Most rounds travel in an arc. That means if you are zero at 50 yards, you might be high at 25 yards.

    Does that help? :)
     
  5. Mount_Sannine

    Mount_Sannine New Member

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    Thank you for this.
    It make sense why its dangerous to fire at water the way you explained it.
    I am grateful also for the scope explanation.
     
  6. skullcrusher

    skullcrusher New Member

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    You are welcome. But, I just offered the simplicity of your original question based on the air rifle and the scope.

    Well trained military snipers actually use wind, distance, humidity, elevation, temperature, etc, etc in their adjustments. Tactical scopes have windage and elevation knobs that can be adjusted without removing caps and all. Real science meets ballistic known data resulting in just plain amazing performance and skill. We all don't have expert spotters and equipment to do what we all would love to learn. :D
     
  7. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    thats why im training my wife how to be a spotter heh. she doesnt like shooting the rifle but the spotting scope appeals to her.
     
  8. Catfish

    Catfish Member

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    Think about it........The scope center is about 2 1/2 inches above the bore center. That means that if the scope is held level the barrel will have to be pointed up alittle to get the pellet to cross the line of sight of the scope. With a short range zero the pellet will come up to the line of sight and then go over it and as it fall back down will go through the line of sight again. With centerfire rifles used for varmint hunting alot of hunters set their scopes for maximum point blank range where the bullet will never be more than 2 1/2 inches above or below the line of sight. Long range shooters will work out a drop chart and usually tape it on the gun. It will tell them what to set the elevation at for any given range. With a good drop chart and a good range finder shots from 400 to 600 yards are fairly easy and with practice one can reach out to 100 yards and behond. The same principals apply to your pellet rifle. For target shooting you just zero it at the distance your shooting, but fir hunting you might want to zero it so the the pellet will never go more than 1/2 inch above the line of sight and then find the yardage it goes below the line of sight by 1/2 inch and call that your max. point blank range. Behond the yardage you will need to hold over the target. If you want to work up a drop chart and shoot it long range pm me and I`ll help you get started.
     
  9. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    Mount S - I think you might benefit from doing some reading on scope mounting and scope operation.

    On an air rifle, this is not as crucial, because you are not shooting at such a distance that you have to factor in as many variables.

    Granted, the variables are there, but in a much smaller, less impacting way.

    For "Long Range Marksmen" that come out of our shop, we have a bit of an easy to use trick that we share upon occassion that I am going to share with you.

    The top knob on your scope is for elevation. The further out you are shooting, the more "elevation" you have to crank into your scope to compensate.

    When you are shooting known distances, you sight your rifle at various "common to you" distances and mark down the adjustments of your scope.

    Now, get some medical/surgical tape. The thin 1/2" wide stuff that holds bandages in place.

    Wrap that around the top of your elevation knob. Leave most of the marks visable.

    With a pen, mark in on the white surgical tape the lines that correspond the known distances.

    When you change distances at the range, or in the field, just dial in the elevation knob to match the distance that you are shooting at. :)

    No math.

    No counting clicks.

    No trying to figure out a Mil-Dot.

    Just dial in, sight in and pull the trigger.

    JD
     
  10. Yunus

    Yunus New Member

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    Inexpensive scopes may not be as "repeatable" with the adjustments. It all depends on your scope and you will need to try it to know. If that is the case then I suggest you find a common middle ground shooting distance and manually adjust by aiming high or low, if this is the case. It's not ideal but you have to work with the equipment you have or buy better stuff :)
     
  11. AcidFlashGordon

    AcidFlashGordon New Member

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    That beats the Hell out of trying to figure out whether or not the drop compensator on a scope works or not. I will definitely give this little tip a tryout when I finally get some time to get to the new Clark County Shooting Range to test out the "zero" on my AR-15s scope. I'll also give it a shot once I zero the LPS 4x6º TIP2 scope that came with my PSL. It only took me about 10 minutes online to find a "manual" for that scope, seeing as how I've never dealt with that type before. I'm also looking for maybe a Bushnell or Zeiss spotting scope. Or some other brand. I'm not stuck in the "I only want this or that brand scope" mode.
     
  12. skullcrusher

    skullcrusher New Member

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    The method JD is talking about works well with the scopes that you don't have to remove caps to adjust. Tactical scope if you will. It makes for easy and fast adjustment. Now if your scope has caps that must be removed for you windage and elevation adjustments that method won't work. I suppose if a person took a scribe and marked lines on the lip for the adjustments, that might work. Of course, don't forget to carry a small screwdriver or a dime so the adjustments can be made that way. :)
     
  13. Mount_Sannine

    Mount_Sannine New Member

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    Thank you so much people. You guys are the best :)

    Here is the scope I'm using; its brand is BSA http://www.bsaoptics.com/scope.aspx?productID=25

    I've been trying it mostly on paper targets with known distances. And thanks to your explanation I understand now that the pellets I'm shooting undergo a considerable drop in height at 100 and 150 yards, since I'm hitting below target while at 30 yards for example I'm being right on target...

    JD, (I love your nickname by the way cause that is what my friends call me here due to my excessive consummation of Jack Daniel's!)

    Thank you for the tip you have given me. I'm planning to hunt birds with my rifle and I'll be shooting at various distances. But since my not so professional scope has caps on it, I'm thinking of removing the one that fixes the height so I can have easier access to the finger tip adjustable turet, or should I keep it on and aim over and below target? maybe I should try both techniques and see which one works for me.

    Thanks again FTFers
    Cheers
     
  14. gadrooning

    gadrooning New Member

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    Also you really can't sight in a scope properly by shooting at a point into the ground or water for that matter. You should be sighting in on something that stands vertical like a paper target. When you are shooting towards the ground you effectivley shooting at an angled target wich means the the gun might sight in 2" high but your bullit might strike 8 feet into the ground past the target. You really can't zero in properly. Setup a target either at 25, 50, 75, or 100 yrds, whatever you feel the rifle can hit consitantly and zero it in. than move the target in 25yrd intervals and take note where it hit the target. and use this guide for future use.
     
  15. gadrooning

    gadrooning New Member

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    This also is some good reading. you might want to take a look at this also. Shooting an air rifle over along distance has high wid drift. You'll have to set up some experiments yourself.


    Determining wind values and making your shots