Shooting Skill

Discussion in 'Semi-Auto Handguns' started by NewGunz, Jul 13, 2010.

  1. NewGunz

    NewGunz New Member

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    I've probably been to the range a total of 10-15 times. I've seen many videos on shooting on YouTube from people like Todd Jarret. I've also overheard and imitated what I've heard from instructors at the range. However, I've never had any real one-on-one instruction other than when I first started and the range employee showed me the basics.

    Using what I've learned from research and videos, I am now able to shoot 6-10s on the NRA 25 yd. Bullseye at 17-25 yards. I've really focused on my grip, trigger finger, arms/elbows, and stance. Is there anything else I should work on when it comes to being a more accurate shooter? I feel like I've hit a bit of an imrpovement plateau. One thing I don't have much training on is sights. What I usually do is use my left eye to align my target with the center of the 3 dots on my P226's "contrast sights" and then fire. I enjoy shooting every time, but I also like to always be improving.
     
  2. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    Are you right or left handed? Right or left dominant eye? What stance do you use? Grip?
     

  3. WDB

    WDB New Member

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    Best way to improve when new is spend a little money for instruction. While you feel your doing everything right an objective view from an instructor might cure a bad habit before it becomes a hard habit to break. After that shoot often, it's like anyting in life, the more you do it the better you get.
     
  4. Agent_H

    Agent_H New Member

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    Newgunz - I like your demeanor. :) Good questions and post. Not a McMuffin lol
     
  5. NewGunz

    NewGunz New Member

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    Right handed, left dominant eye, I usually use a pretty relaxed stance (so as to absorb recoil rather than fight it) with my left foot forward, and the grip I use involves wrapping both hands around the pistol and putting my thumbs and hands pretty much as high on the pistol as I can without touching the slide itself. My thumbs I try to keep high and pointing forward. At first I flinched my finger a lot but I'm getting much better at that. One thing that I'm unsure of is how "hard" to grab the pistol when firing. If I hold it loosely like I would a casual item and fire, the gun bucks up more and it feels a little uncomfortable on my wrist. But if I hold it a little tighter, I have more control over it but it tends to be less accurate. Interestingly, some of those times when I've let the gun go and buck up, I've hit a direct bullseye - very accurate.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2010
  6. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Don't know where you live. If you were close, maybe we could get together.

    You know those light switches in your house? Do a lot of dry fire on them from different positions and distances (Triple check that the handgun is unloaded!!!).
    Bring the handgun up to what you are seeing, don't bring your head down to the sights.

    Don't use a "death grip", you'll tire out quicker. Imagine a hammer in you hand. It needs enough looseness to swing, but not enough looseness to fly out of your hand.

    Follow the four parts of handgun shooting:
    1. Sight alignment (try to keep both eyes open. Your face won't get as tired as trying to keep one eye close. If needed, put a piece of tape on the non-dominant eye safety glasses lens.)
    2. Breath control (inhale, exhale a little, hold while pulling trigger, complete exhale, repeat)
    3. Pull the trigger (some people say "squeeze the trigger", but you should pull the trigger by moving the trigger finger only. I've seen people try to squeeze the complete grip area when all they should be moving is the trigger finger straight back.)
    4. Trigger follow through (until you get practiced enough (you'll know when), release the trigger the same rate you pulled it.)

    Repeat the steps, about 15 minutes a day. Muscle memory goes a long way in shooting.
     
  7. NewGunz

    NewGunz New Member

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    Thanks for the advice. Unfortunately, I live in California so unless I drive for 3 days, I don't think a meet up is possible, haha. As a quick side-note: Is it safe to dry-fire my Sig Sauer P226? I've heard that dry firing some guns can hurt the firing pin without snapcaps.
     
  8. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Snap caps should be used. But, you should not have any problems dry firing without them.
    I believe that Brownells has the snap caps in your caliber. Google or Bing them.
    Good luck.
     
  9. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

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    I have a lazy right eye so I've had to develop a stance and grip that allows me to shoot right-handed and left-eyed. It took some time to develop and refine but I'm comfortable I can shoot well at reasonable distances...
     
  10. big shrek

    big shrek Well-Known Member

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    A good .22 pistol makes it inexpensive to practice...an inexpensive one like the GSG-1911 or the Puma 1911-22 give one great semi-auto practice, while a single action Heritage revolver will teach "One-Shot Counts" skills better than most.
     
  11. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    alot of good info here. I choose to practice by watching TV and taking out characters on the shows. Once you have your trigger control to the point that the sights do not move, youve achieved something.

    Never hold a gun loosely. I thought I was onto something by doing that 10 years ag0, its not condusive to accuracy.

    Like he said about the haMMER, firm, but dont suqeeze its guts out.
     
  12. kdog

    kdog New Member

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    Get a good instructor to look over your shoulder and have him tel lyou, what you have to different.

    As I read, you are shooting a P226. How big/small are your hands?
    I have a P226 aswell and always had problems with the large grip. I now bought the P226 E2 grip kit and installed it. My grip is more stable and comfortable now. I don`t knowl if the E2 grip kit is available in the US, but it could be ordered in germany.

    Practice at home with snap caps to get the muscle memory working for you. I trie to do this a few time in a week. Once a day for 10mins is better then one a week for an hour.

    And then, this is the most valuable tip I got from my instructor (yip guys I found one, and he is for free:D), practice, practice, practice.
    My biggest mistake is only going to the range twice per month. I am trying to setup that I can go at least once a week.
     
  13. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

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    Good advice from all...if you are a golfer you know all too well what happens when bad habits get into muscle memory, a lifetime of hooks, slices and general disdain for the game. Develop the fine motor skills now so they become "instinctive", once the adrenalin flows in a real life situation all you have is instinct and training...cognitive skills go out the window.
     
  14. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    You may find this interesting:

    DOUG KOENIG: NON-DOMINANT EYE CLOSED?

    The bad advice that I hear most often is to shoot with one eye, the non-dominant one, closed. Most military schools and expert instructors teach that both eyes should be open, even in long range shooting. However, I still see a lot of instructors telling shooters to close the non-dominant eye. This is the absolute wrong way to teach shooting. Although many shooters may believe that the monocular versus binocular shooting is simply a difference in approach, the "one eye closed" method is not correct. --Doug Koenig, Professional Shooter, Hornady Ammunition

    The pressure you apply to the handgun while griping it is complex, but do it right and it is very rewarding.

    Think of your purchase of the gun as a process using multiple assemblies, each with a different function.
    • Assembly one is your strong side hand (holding the handgun) and arm.
    • Assembly two is the weak side hand and arm.
    Let's put the two assemblies together.

    Think of the pressure you apply to the gun's stock by both hands as 100%. Now concentrate on reducing the strong side hand's pressure to ~40% while increasing the weak side hand's purchase to ~60%. This frees up the trigger finger to act alone while pulling the trigger to sear release.

    The second function of these two assemblies is positioning and isometric resistance.

    The strong side arm should be out straight with a slight bend in the elbow. (Not locked) This hand should be 'pushing' the gun forward.

    And the weak side arm should have the elbow noticeably bent straight down. This hand should be applying isometric (equal) resistance to the 'push' exerted by the strong side hand. This controls muzzle rise and gets the sight back on target faster.

    There is a lot to do but if it were easy you would not have asked the question.

    Until this becomes second nature follow these steps (for a right strong side shooter) as you progress to trigger pull:
    1. Left foot out, the body is bladed partly sideways in relation to the target rather than squared towards it.
    2. Right arm out, elbow not locked but tucked.
    3. Right hand holding the stock with ~40% grip pressure.
    4. Left arm with elbow noticeably bent straight down and tucked.
    5. Left hand applying ~60% of stock purchase.
    6. Both hands in isometric resistance. (Push/Pull)
    7. Front sight, front sight, front sight................

    Practice this until it becomes a smooth muscle memory and it will serve you well and someday may save your life!
     
  15. kdog

    kdog New Member

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    Even if it looks stupid, cover your non dominant eye with half transparent material.
    That way, you can shoot with both eyes open but your focus is only on the dominant eye, with out haviing double vision.

    This will train your dominant eye a bit like on children, that have the strong eye covered to train the weak eye.

    I took some half transparent sticky lables and put them on the left lens on my Rx insert of my safety glasses.
    Shooting now is much more comfortable.
     
  16. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    On the range, load 5 at a time. This way you will be "forced" to take a break and have a chance to evaluate your shooting. Loading to max capacity will tempt you to shoot all at once, and for a new shooter, this could be tiring and confusing on what holes you did what.