Shooting Range Cooks

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by homerfan, May 23, 2007.

  1. homerfan

    homerfan New Member

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    I shoot at a "red neck" range outside of town and I meet the strangest people in the World there.

    This past weekend this toothless guy started yelling at me because my gun was on it's side pointed down range. He demanded the gun be upright and made this sandbag fort in order to do it. I didn't argue! He's just one of many. Even the owner is an odd one. Huge Alex Jones fan.
     
  2. Brent L

    Brent L New Member

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    Was your firearm's action closed? Did you make sure it was unloaded?

    I might agree with "toothless" if it weren't visibly "SAFE".
     

  3. Splatter

    Splatter New Member

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    If no one is 'playing' with it while I was down-range I don't even care if it's unloaded. I don't know anyone that has any guns that spontaneously discharge.
    Do some of your firearms fire themselves?
     
  4. bkt

    bkt New Member

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    No, I never heard of firearms spontaneously firing when they're left alone. But I have heard of people messing with firearms and having them fire.

    At the range I go to, the rules are pretty clear: any time anyone needs to cross the line to put up or take down a target, every firearm must be resting on a table (on its side is fine), unloaded, no mags, and a brightly-colored plastic open-bolt/empty-chamber indicator flag has to be in place to ensure it's empty. Everyone not going down range must stand several feet behind their firearm.

    As for range kooks, yes, we get 'em too. That's why I keep a copy of the rule booklet with me whenever I go.
     
  5. Splatter

    Splatter New Member

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    Seems a bit redundant. If they are empty, why not play with them, and if you can't touch them, why unload and chamber-flag?

    I often use a range where if you are at least 3 lanes away, you can keep shooting while someone is at the target stands. The range has been in operation at least since WW2 (maybe longer; but no one is really sure) and no one's been shot yet.
     
  6. Splatter

    Splatter New Member

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    I initially though that this thread would be about having BBQs and pancake breakfasts at your range.

    And/or teminating those 'range cooks' if they were substandard.

    :lol:
     
  7. Brent L

    Brent L New Member

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    Splatter, I agree with you about the bad range cooks, they should be banned and their aprons confiscated!:D

    No, my guns don't fire themselves. I am glad that where you shoot that there have been no accidents. I prefer to take as much risk out of the equation as possible, so I want to visibly see that a gun that I may walk in front of IS UNLOADED. Call me a euphemism for a kitty cat, but I want to remain a LIVE kitty cat.
     
  8. notdku

    notdku Administrator Staff Member

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    I used to go to this real thrashy range. There was this patron who would not even shoot. Just watch people and comment on what you are doing wrong. One time he told me a story that he went down range and someone started shooting on another range, they have handgun, rifle and long rifle, but the bullet jumped range and hit him. Showed me the wound and all.
     
  9. ScottG

    ScottG New Member

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    That's what we're told every day!!!! That's why they need to be baaaannned. Guns are vicious killers, duping peaceful, loving choirboys into committing crimes.:eek:
     
  10. Splatter

    Splatter New Member

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    So you've been working to have the rules changed to require that the firearms be cased and put back into the vehicles they arrived in during each break in the firing?

    I'm all for limiting risk; but there comes a point where further restrictions are pointless, and result in such small increases in potential safety as to be immeassurable.

    If you reduce your risk so that you only expect someone to get shot every 100 years of operation, is it really going to be a safer range during your lifetime than a range that is set-up to only let someone get shot every 1000 years of operation? (getting shot at a firearms range is always a "non-zero" probability)
     
  11. Brent L

    Brent L New Member

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    Spatter, my brother. Your taking this way too far to the point of absurdity. I suggested nothing of the kind. Obviously, you subscribe to the "live and let die" theory of gun range safety!

    Can you see by my last statement that I can come up with a statement just as absurd as yours?

    I can tell that you think that I am a martinet, I assure you I am not. I am not the hand wringing wimp who wants to create rules just to create them. I am for range safety, not just for me, but for everyone.

    Besides that it is only one rule that we're discussing. UNLOADED VERIFICATION!

    Agree or disagree?
     
  12. bkt

    bkt New Member

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    So anyone going down range can verify they're really empty just by a quick glance. If no one is touching them, no one can reload them.

    Everyone I have met at my club takes safety seriously and is a competent shot. Many are expert marksmen. But there are indicators on the walls and ceiling that misfires happen (or that an idiot is wielding a rifle). From my point of view, there is no shortage of examples of incredible stupidity. I have no problem with the club owners erring on the side of caution.

    My club was founded in 1925 and no one has been shot. I guess both sets of rules work for their respective clubs.
     
  13. Rentacop

    Rentacop New Member

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    Guys-
    There's a reason for redundant safety rules . If people are required to stand well back from the line, they won't absent-mindedly pick up a gun and handle it . If the guns are unloaded, a hot gun cannot cook off a round ( Guns can fire by themselves after all ! ) .
    Ordinary orange wire ties can be used as chamber flags . As pointed out above, this allows anyone to verify that the rules are being followed .
    But what about a " Hot Range " system in which all guns are loaded and either holstered or being fired . Such a system works, with proper procedures and disciplined shooters . "Hot Range" is not feasible for ranges where long guns are laid on tables and target pistols are used without holsters .
    Experience tells us that ranges have suffered accidents and scary incidents when they failed to enact and enforce strict rules . We can learn from that . That said, it is standard procedure nearly everywhere to set the gun down with the muzzle pointed down-range and leave it that way while people are checking targets .
    Some ranges require those going downrange to wear blaze orange . That is due to the sad experience I alluded to above .
     
  14. WDB

    WDB New Member

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    I have to sort of agree, the range we shoot long guns at there are frequesnt issues with a guy picking up his rifle while the range is down to do what ever. It's a bit unsetteling to be hanging a new target and look back at the firing line to see a guy with a rifle in hand. All the same the having all rifles set on the rest, unloaded with open action visiable is a fair safety procedure. As I don't want to get shot by a loaded rifle being bumped or falling of the rest or in the rare chance a not barrel poping the round. Same goes for staying off the firing line when a cease fire is called, there is no reason for a person to be on the firing line when others are down range. Might seem like a hastle but it only take one odd accident or a nut case to make the rules seem reasonable.
     
  15. WDB

    WDB New Member

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    Rentacop,
    If I had to wear Blaze orange when checking or changing targets I would find another range. Clearly that range isn't in control of the shooters and I'm not going to risk my life to change paper.
     
  16. hunter Joe

    hunter Joe New Member

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    Guys remember that the first rule of firearm safety is: always point your muzzle in a safe direction, and the second rule is: always treat every firearm as if it were loaded. These are not only the first two rules of hunter safety they are also the first two rules of the NRA's ten commandments of firearm safety.

    I'm a hunter safety instructor and a range officer at my club. When I'm running the range, firearms are racked with the muzzles pointing straight up and only then is the range closed and it is safe to proceed down-range. See rules one and two for further explanation. HJ
     
  17. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    The range I shoot at and chair has three basic rules.

    1. Evryone must know and agree the range is hot or cold.

    2. NO ONE touches guns or ammo while range is cold.

    3. You are responsable for your own safety.

    While I under stand all the rules and redundant rules. Some people need them. YOu better believe that if I am donw range and you start shooting I am going to do one of two things. Return fire and or kick your mother effing ass and break your guns in half with my car. If the range is a busy range then chamber flags are a good thing as it allows the RSO and anyone else to quickly see that all firearms are unloaded.
     
  18. mpd8488

    mpd8488 New Member

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    The way I see it, at a public range it's common curtesy to step away from you firearm when people are down range. It's pretty damn hard to tell from more than 50 meters or so down range whether the guy fiddling with his gun at his stall has a loaded weapon. You can't tell whether that guy has been handling firearms all his life or whether he just bought his first rifle because of the election. Especially at ranges with no safety officer, we all have an obligation to police ourselves and especially show new shooters proper safety and ettiquite (without being an ******* if possible). All it takes is one misshap for public ranges to be shut down forever.
     
  19. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Yet another reason i prefer to shoot at the abandoned oil well excavation: if i'm down range changing my target, my gun is with me and there is no one else around. Locked gates & "no trespass" signs also help if an annoyed hunter complains about the noise (who let you in here again).

    The ranges around here would have a similar crowd to the oil well pit, most days. If i went to a range with such an abundance of rules, i'd most likely leave to preserve the mutual happiness of the group.