Shooting low

Discussion in '1911 Forum' started by Jhamblen, Feb 27, 2012.

  1. Jhamblen

    Jhamblen New Member

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    Took my 1911 out the other day and noticed I have been consistently shooting low. I don't feel afraid of the 45. What else could it be? I don't feel like I am compensating. Any ideas?

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  2. The_Kid

    The_Kid New Member

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    Have a friend load your magazine; whereas, they put one or two snap-cap rounds in it. Fire the gun while having your friend observe.

    Another option would be to use a rest noting the POI heights.
     

  3. Durangokid

    Durangokid New Member

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    This is often due to a heavy trigger. When the trigger pull exceeds the weight of the gun the muzzle can drop. The point at which the sear breaks the muzzle drops. Try firing from a sand bag rest. It may be as simple as a tall front sight.:)
     
  4. Jhamblen

    Jhamblen New Member

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    I have been wanting to get a different trigger and I guess a spring kit to decrease pull weight. Think that would help?

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  5. Jhamblen

    Jhamblen New Member

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    Also, what about a new sear? I looked into what you said about a heavy trigger pull. 3.5-5lbs on a stock 38oz Remington R1.

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  6. Durangokid

    Durangokid New Member

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    The Wilson sear sure helped my Colt Officers Mdl. Your trigger pull is way heavy.:)
     
  7. DodgerBlue

    DodgerBlue New Member

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    i learned that even though i was looking straight down the gun at my target, I wasnt.

    Try this and be honest with yourself. I was so trying to get my arm tight and straight with a good grip, I was actualy tilting my wrist in a downward position.

    It looked stright while holding the gun, but somebody pointed it to me at the range. Locking the elbow and arm straight I had to teach my wrist to almost tilt up but actualy it was straight. It felt weird at first, like i was gonna hit high but it worked.

    If your elbow,arm, and wrist are stright, you can run your free hand the lenght of your arm to the end of your hand stright shot. If you were holding a gun and you ran your hand and hit your wrist, you were in a poisition to shoot low again

    That was how I taught my self to aim straight. Now Im working on breathing and trigger controll. To get consistant shots where I want them.
     
  8. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    Both good suggestions -
    Also just let a friend shoot it -
     
  9. Jhamblen

    Jhamblen New Member

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    Up to this point I have practiced with snap caps. I have taken dead brass and put one on top of my slide and balanced it while practicing trigger pull. Also my father has put a few mags down it. He knocked out the black. I feel lost, I do want to test the idea of my wrist being cocked down. I am locking my shoulder elbow and wrist.

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  10. PanBaccha

    PanBaccha New Member

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    A keen observation. Good advise.
     
  11. Jhamblen

    Jhamblen New Member

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    So it's possible i need a new spring kit, lower front sight, and could be cocking my wrist down?

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  12. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    It's a new gun, shoot it, get to know the gun before you make any changes.

    • NO new springs, it's a new gun.
    • If you lower the the front sight your dad will shoot high. (see below*)
    • The only change you need should be your experience with this new gun. Get your dad to teach you to shoot. He seems to be doing something right!

    You want some real help? Get a friend to video you shooting and post it up. We'll tell you what you're doing wrong!

    * About as good a summary as I've ever heard from my friend gorknoids;
    The sights on your pistol are probably within a gnat's ass of being perfect. If they are not perfect, at least they are consistent. The other half of the shooting machine (The nut holding the weapon ) will never be perfect or consistent. Like fingerprints, every trigger-squeeze is unique. All of us ( Okay, all but 2 who will deny it) let go a "flyer" every now and then. Some of us (Me) do it more than most, and it's impossible to pinpoint just which one of the variables caused the shot to go wandering. I'm talking about missing the target entirely at 15 yards when you're accustomed to putting half inside the 7 ring or better. I don't count anything inside the 8 because I know it was just luck, because I'm not that good.
    The idea is to recognize that you have 2 things working for you (A well-made gun and a stationary target) and about a gazillion things working against you (Distractions, all of your muscles, your eyesight, ADD, whatever) and to work on minimizing the things which work against you. The thing I have found to be the most helpful is rhythmic breathing. It gives me timing, keeps things fluid, and keeps me from fixating on muzzle wobble. See it, shoot it, inhale; see it, shoot it, inhale. Firearm design and ballistics are studies in mathematics, but shooting is Zen. You have to put the human into it, but you can't force the issue. The big thing is to practice a lot so that you're not caught up with the mechanics of the act and more focused on simply recognizing when the shot is going to go where you ask it to.​


    Under the 'If it ain't broke, don't fix it!' column, Let me share this little MSH "fix" I didn't know I needed.

    When I first got my Defender I couldn't hit paper with it! The gun had FTF and FTE issues and my cognitive dissonance was screaming what a dumb purchase!!!

    My third trip to the range was my turning point. It was a slow day and the Range Officer was hanging around me escaping from the boredom. After watching my frustration he offered this question, "First mouse gun?" My hubris wanted to tell him to go clean up brass but my intellect said help. I said, “Yep.”

    He said, “You can’t grip that mini-me like a Government model. Your grip is too low.

    He went on to show me how to grip the Defender by jamming my thumb-web into the beavertail first and then let my fingers find their natural placement. He went on to tell me my grip looked good but he bet me he could make it better.

    I figured at this point any assistance will help and said, “How?” He explained that he bet my strong side hand was doing all the gripping and that would pull the muzzle off target when the trigger is pulled. Have your weak side hand provide about 60% of the grip pressure.

    I ran the remainder of my ammo on target, NO FTF/FTEs, me in amazement and the Range Officer with a big grin on his face!

    What’s that cute story have to do with a MSH? OK…OK I’m getting to it!

    My hands were obviously too big for this 3” 1911. In search for a fix I thought the addition of a magwell would add to the length of the Defender frame. (I know, I know, I should’ve bought the LW Commander!!)

    I called Smith & Alexander in Texas and got Allen Smith. I explained the above ‘cute’ story and WOW! Talking to Allen is like taking a pistolsmith class! He said my problem was more a MSH issue than a short grip. He ask me if my shots were mostly low and to the weak side? ...."Yep."

    He told me that when the Army came back to Browning for changes to the M1911 one of the complaints was the Calvary, shooting mostly from horseback, were always hitting under their targets and wanted something done with the sights. JMB being the true genius that he was knew the sights were fine and came up with the arched MSH to force the shooter’s hand up higher on the grip. This simple change moves the muzzle higher in a natural point shooting stance and increased accuracy. The arched housing is one of the few changes made to the design and the result was the M1911A1 introduced in 1924. (Thank God they didn’t change the name to 1924!)

    The reason we see few arched MSH's on today’s production 1911’s is due to the small horseback shooting demographic.

    I share this experience with you (and others) to show how an unknown problem was fixed by observant and helpful fellow gun owner.
     
  13. Jhamblen

    Jhamblen New Member

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    So you think most of it is in my grip? I could see that. Sometimes I shoot great and other times im shooting low and to my weak side.

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  14. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Yes I do. Keep practicing.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. Jhamblen

    Jhamblen New Member

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    Thank you

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