Shooting Help

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by lbarrychevy, Oct 29, 2011.

  1. lbarrychevy

    lbarrychevy New Member

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    So I just got a Remington 1911, and took it to the range today. Now I have had my Blackhawk 357 for about a year and I generally shoot high and to the left. I have adjusted the sights and got it kind of close. But now this 1911 is shooting low and to the left. So... Am I gripping the gun to tight? I have a nice steady pull on the trigger. I have shot enough to feel conferrable and not scared of the recoil. I did find that the rear sight on the 1911 where off by .010, and I have adjusted them. I will see if that makes a difference next time at the range.
     
  2. rebel619

    rebel619 New Member

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    Make this your new best friend...

    correction_chart.jpg



    correction_chart.jpg
     

  3. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

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    Sounds like your may be jerking the trigger a little bit
     
  4. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

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    Most new guns out of the box require 500 or so rounds to get "settled in." Usually not a good idea to adjust anything until that point, you may have to unadjust it later. Also, the grip you use on a revolver is a bit diffferent than a semi-auto so that may also be contributing to the difference in the point of impact from the .357. The aim diagnosis target is a great training tool, dry firing using a laser or laser bore sight visually shows the problem as it occurs and the ammo cost is zero. :D
     
  5. lbarrychevy

    lbarrychevy New Member

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    Lol. I just downloaded that target. I have looked into the Laser Lyte electric target, but its not cheep. I did not know about the break in period. I'm up to about 300 or so rounds on my 357. Only put 50 through the 1911. I figured I just need more practice. I do dry fire a lot.
     
  6. Hotshot

    Hotshot New Member

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    To me handguns require different training methods to become "good". I started training only with live rounds with somewhat OK results then I was training with some friends who are LEO trainers and they took my mags and loaded 5 live rounds and 2 dummy rounds with them. All they told me was there were 7 rounds. Started shooting and got to the first dummy and wow did I pull the gun. This is now how I train with friends just to keep my mind on the correct method.
     
  7. lbarrychevy

    lbarrychevy New Member

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    A few more dumb questions. So I want a firm but light grip on the gun right? Should I let the recoil bring the up? Hold on. Let me explain. What I do after the shot is fired I let the recoil bring my arm up to about a 90 degree angle. I also shoot two handed. I wonder if my left hand is pulling the gun left.
     
  8. lbarrychevy

    lbarrychevy New Member

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    I might have to try that HotShot.
     
  9. silverado113

    silverado113 New Member

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  10. dunerunner

    dunerunner New Member

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    Great charts, both!!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  11. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    If you hold a hammer too tight, your hand cramps up and it impedes the swing. Hold it too loose, and it flies out of you hand.

    Too tight on a hand gun tends to increase the unsteadiness of the sight picture, and too loose will not allow the slide to function.

    Use the "V" between the trigger finger and thumb so the barrel is in line with the forearm. The arm can then provide more mass to reduce the felt recoil VS. the thumb or hand. Trigger has to come straight to the rear, any side movement when pulling the trigger will put your shots off.

    Also, think about follow-through. When dry firing, if you release the trigger too fast, the muzzle will move (and that's a no-no to good shooting). Try to "pull through" to the stop and release the trigger at the same speed you used to pull it after the shot is fired.
     
  12. unclebear

    unclebear New Member

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    that chart become my best friend as soon as I saw it, it actually helped tighten up my groups
     
  13. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    90 degrees is waaaay to high. How are you going to recover for a 2nd quick shot?
     
  14. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

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    The recoil will force the gun to travel along the path of least resistance, in the case of a right handed shooter that is back and to the left...try to twist your right wrist, what direction is the most comfortable? The role of the support hand is to resist that leftward travel and take the recoil straight back along the axis of the right arm. This actually reduces the recoil and aids control for follow up shots.

    BTW, a fairly inexpensive laser or laser bore sight can be purchased on e-bay for about $20. It doesn't have to be durable enough to withstand the force of the recoil so cheap is ok.
     
  15. lbarrychevy

    lbarrychevy New Member

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    Lots of good info guys. Thanks. I figure more practice. That's the only way to get good. Talked with the guy that runs the pistol league at the range I go to and I'm going to start going over on practice night. Maybe some of the old guys can set me straight. JTJ I'm not concerned about a quick 2nd shot yet. I would just like to get decent groups, some what close to the center of the target.
     
  16. rebel619

    rebel619 New Member

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    Thats funny u said that cause im lefty too...

    3689d1303673808-shooting-low-left-pistol-correction-lh-mini.jpg
     
  17. silverado113

    silverado113 New Member

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    I used the heck out of both of these charts when I was a small arms instructor in the Corps. It's funny though how many people think because they are a good rifle shooter that they will be a good pistol shooter. That is until the shoot a pistol for the first time and realize there is a lot more to it.
     
  18. rebel619

    rebel619 New Member

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    Very true...