Shooting from behind barricade??

Discussion in 'Training & Safety' started by BlindOldMan, Mar 22, 2011.

  1. BlindOldMan

    BlindOldMan New Member

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    I was doing a survey of my house last night and running through various scenarios. One thing that occurred to me is that some of the entrances are line-of-sight from a right-hand wall. I.e., if I were forced to engage an intruder from one entrance, I'd need to barricade behind a wall/corner to my right.

    I generally practice with my right hand though I write/throw with my left. I am right eye dominant.

    What is the best technique for shooting from this position?

    Shooting with my left hand is one option. Leaning and shooting with my right, while facing target, is another. It seems that I could also face the *other* direction but this would mean shooting without the support hand (though it would afford the most cover while shooting from the dominant hand).

    Sorry if this isn't too clear... I can elaborate if needed.
     
  2. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    My initial thought would be to back away from the wall to your right and cut the pie moving left until you could bring the gun to bear on the intruder.

    The intruder would have to pivot left to shoot at you in this position, so unless your house was being broken into by Jack or another operator :)eek:), their focus is probably going to be forward/straight ahead.

    With you changing the axis point of where your cover starts and stops it allows you to cover a lot more territory with a simple shuffle step. You can lean to your left to allow for your right hand to make the shot and lean back to get back behind the cover, as the "cover' is now closer to the attacker. Law of the Horizon and all that.

    Another thought is to change levels on an attacker, but that would not be my first inclination. Dropping to a knee or lying down might take too long and expose you to a position of dominance immediately if swarmed.

    Interesting question. I will be reading the answers to see what the others have to say.

    JD
     

  3. IGETEVEN

    IGETEVEN New Member

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    Well, unless you live in a house where the interior walls are masonry/brick they would afford you the best cover needed to do what you said. If you have drywall or stucco interior walls and hollow doors like most, and you have a BG that is definitely shooting back, depending on the weapons used...shooting through the wall at him will give you the best results and the cover to move up and forward to a better barrier and/or shooting position, and them. YMMV
     
  4. AOK

    AOK New Member

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    Shooting off handed or strong hand supported is fine. I would usually shoot off hand supported in that situation but that's me. You should try working on different techniques and tactics to find out what works best for YOU.

    Just like if you take a class. There are many different tactics and techniques being taught. It's up to the student to keep an open mind and see if the new concept works for them or not. It's better to experiment and practice now than when you're in the middle of a
    fight.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2011
  5. gruntpain1775

    gruntpain1775 New Member

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    Check out this video. From my experience this is the best way to did it with a pistol.

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCC1f-_4ztI]YouTube - Max Michel Shooting Tips - Tip #3 - Shooting Around a Barricade[/ame]
     
  6. 7point62

    7point62 Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Practice strong/support-side transitions. Max Michel has some good tips but I disagree with his support-side stance because he exposes too much of himself leaning outward to fire with his strong (right) side. If you are in your house chances are you will be firing around a corner as opposed to a "barricade" so you won't be firing right and left in quick succession, you will be firing one or the other initially.

    If you are right handed, it is not that difficult to learn to fire with your support (left) hand and eye using your right hand as support underneath your left.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2011
  7. BlindOldMan

    BlindOldMan New Member

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    more info

    Thanks for the suggestions...

    To elaborate just a bit... The room is along a corridor. That particular wall on the right is a foundation wall (kudos for reminding me to check that).

    I'm constrained at the back, so cannot subtend the arc much beyond that single axis. My concern is that were I to seek better positioning along the corridor, I'll end up shooting towards a wall to the far left (not on diagram) that is just drywall.

    You folks are awesome.. I am grateful for sharing your experiences/knowledge and suggestions.


    [​IMG]
     
  8. Poink88

    Poink88 New Member

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    This ^^^. If you can get the Thunder Ranch DVD by Clint Smith...he covered this well. IIRC, you have to always let you gun take point (ready to fire)...present it slightly ahead as you look or move forward each "slice". I know it will be a bit awkward but you will have to do some body contortions as you move through this.

    Something to consider. If you are "slicing" as stated on the previous post, your wall/cover might not be sufficient to stop his bullet being shot at you.

    Also covered in the Thunder Ranch DVD is always having your exit strategy if things go south.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2011
  9. 7point62

    7point62 Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    If I were the "me" in your diagram, my left eye, my weapon and my hands would be the only thing on the danger side of that wall.

    If you can't get to a range that has a highsmith drill barricade or something similar, you can practice in your home with a dry weapon.
     
  10. Jo da Plumbr

    Jo da Plumbr New Member

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    I started using off hand (for me left) with an air soft pistol. A lot of folks poo poo this but I found it gave a very good indication of if I jerk the pistol during the trigger pull because I could see the pellet not flying straight. Also I could shoot it in the house. (when she was not there :eek: ) Then I started using snap caps to practice trigger control with off hand. Then best thing I did was get a 22 so I could afford to practice a lot at the range with my left. I'm still no crack shot as a lefty but I am comfortable using it; and from across the room I'd be able to put a BG down.
     
  11. 7point62

    7point62 Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Nothing wrong with your ideas. Seriously, I have used Nerf guns to teach younguns room clear/sectors of fire/open or closed stairwell/hallway movement/dynamic corner etc.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2011
  12. Poink88

    Poink88 New Member

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    Is it that difficult to shift the gun to your left using regular 2 hand hold with your pistol? I am fine with it and just curious if others really tried it and having difficulty.

    I don't want to transfer my gun to my left in fear that I might lose my gun after the initial shot due to recoil. I am sure I will not be as accurate too and my grip is not as strong. Just me.
     
  13. BlindOldMan

    BlindOldMan New Member

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    I am actually left handed, but train *mostly* right-handed. I am just as accurate with my left, but a lot slower. Hopefully practice will improve this..

    Maybe I should practice doing somersaults/cartwheels and shoot like in the Matrix? :D
     
  14. IGETEVEN

    IGETEVEN New Member

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    Couldn't hurt. :cool:
     
  15. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    Yes. I have been to Thunder Ranch and this was basically what was taught. Since then I have added a few tricks to the arsenal.

    As for the diagram at hand, I would still suggest changing the battlefield.
    "Come into my parlor" said the spider to the fly :cool:
     

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  16. 7point62

    7point62 Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Good stuff here. Just try to remember that if the scenario ever becomes real you will be in a state of hyper vigiliance, hyper everything, dealing with a surge of adrenaline, rapid heartbeat and respiration, not to mention the natural tendency to want to protect yourself when the rounds start flying. Technique tends to fly out the window so keep everything you practice as simple as possible.
     
  17. AOK

    AOK New Member

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    I agree with all of the above. However, I'd like to add there are good techniques and bad techniques to transition from strong hand to weak hand and vice versa. It's important to learn a "good way" that is safe, simple, and efficient. Then practice, practice, practice.....
     
  18. AOK

    AOK New Member

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    No it's not hard at all. I'll admit though, I remember when I was being introduced to this technique in a class and I had somewhat similar concerns as you.

    There are times it is okay to transition a firearm and times not to. In the middle of firing numerous rounds is not a good time to do so.

    With proper techniques and fundamentals the grip you transitioned into should be equally solid as you initial grip.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2011
  19. pranc2

    pranc2 New Member

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    i think that i would go to a knee and keep the weapon in my right hand. just me.. but come on down the hallway isnt a bad idea either.
    lots of good advice through out.. good reading as well.
    only thing that i can add is only perfect practice makes perfect.:D
     
  20. Car54

    Car54 New Member

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    In most scenarios, once lead starts flying at the bad guy, all you will see is a%# and elbows as he/they try to escape. I say this because most BG's don't expect resistance let alone firearms against them.

    Now if the BG's shoot back, Dillinger's drawing is spot on. The only thing I would add is to gain cover preferably, concealment if no cover is available, and reduce the BG's target area. In other words, make yourself smaller. That could be in a crouched position with the ability to move laterally, or backwards as necessary, or prone which is ideal because BG's don't think about shooting into the ground.

    Defining cover would be something that will offer you the most safety from most caliber's of bullet penetration, eg: brick wall, dirt berm, thick trees, automobile (behind the motor), etc.

    Concealment is something for you to hide behind which offers very little safety from bullet penetration, but will make it harder to be visually spotted. eg: interior house walls, furniture, backyard sheds, bushes, etc.