Sentimental Value

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by TLuker, Jun 23, 2012.

  1. TLuker

    TLuker Active Member

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    I've lost some close friends and family over the last couple of years and I keep seeing the same thing in each case. Their guns go to family members but those family members don't know anything about their guns. Those guns have sentimental value to those people simply because they belonged to a loved one, but that's it. It's sad to have to explain to someone that they should probably hang on to an old beat up rifle because it was their great great grandpa's, and had been passed down for five generations (they should know that!!!). There just seems to be a complete disconnect among families right now, and so much family history is being lost as a result.

    I had to explain to one person that a pistol he inherited came from a German officer in WWII killed by his great grandfather. The officer and his GGF literally ran into each other and the officer put the gun to his GGF's head, pulled the trigger, and it didn't go off. That gun never misfired afterwards. It was sad that person didn't know that piece of their family history, and it would have been even worst if that piece of their family history was lost. :(

    It's sucks loosing so many close friends and relatives, but its even worse seeing how little their families knew about them. It's really sad and I keep seeing it.

    So just a heads up to everyone, if you have special gun with a lot of sentimental value make sure someone knows about it. And write it down just in case.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2012
  2. HockaLouis

    HockaLouis New Member

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    TLuker;
    You must be one of those old fogies who thinks America is exceptional.

    You probably believe those histories, familial or national, are important -- it's in the past dude so leave it alone. Who cares? A gun is just a tool. So what it represents the death-defying line today's men (who live at home with their aging parents) and women (who have to work to pay for their contraceptives but hit a glass ceiling), as well as our underserved children, draw their lineage to and base this imperfect society on?

    They've got bills to pay like taxes and cable TV, six-figure student loans to study cultures at least as good as our own, for leased 4x4's made in Japan and World of Warcraft subscriptions that didn't even exist when you were starting a young family instead of taking everything you could for yourself outta life, so stop preaching. Things have evolved...

    ...citizens (and non-citizens who are the best and brightest) today obviously deserve more and you just sound like one of those damned patriots!
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2012

  3. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    I almost fired up my flamethrower again...but I think that was sarcasm... ;)

    I agree, tluker. Not long ago I sat down with my cousins and tried my best to explain the significance of every one of the trinkets my grandfather collected. It was sad how little they really knew about him. They thought all the toy tractors were just a childhood hobby for him. They didn't even know that each and every one was a handbuilt model replica of tractors that he had actually taken part in building while working for Ford. Hell, they didn't even know he worked for Ford, they thought he was retired army, but he only served a three year draft.

    They had no idea the story behind the axe he kept in the closet instead of the tool shed, the head worn down to a nub. It was the first thing he ever bought for himself with money he earned. When he was ten years old, his father and all his brothers went to Germany, leaving him alone with his Mom and sister. He ran the family farm, and made their first profit in years. When his father got home after three steady years of profit, he told my grandad to get himself something nice for doing such a great job. One of the ways he made a profit was by fighting back the brush that was trying to take over their fields, thereby he was able to plant more wheat, and he just completely wore their axe out. So he bought himself a new one. My Mom has the scythe he bought on that same shopping trip. He wore their old one out during that same time period.

    Those are two completely worthless items (monetarily) that WILL remain in our family FOREVER if I have my way.
     
  4. fmj

    fmj Active Member

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    THIS is something i do A LOT of. I have told each child about the lineage of each gun in the safe.

    How the .35 Rem. was my youngest sons Great grand dads, how it was used to kill many deer and feed the family. How my grand dad was the second son, how my dad was the second son, i was the second son....and him being my second son it only natural it will become his when i am dead and gone.

    Or that the model 4 was something my dad wanted his entire life, and when his boys finally moved out he was finally able to afford the gun he always wanted...but died before he could use it for the reason he always wanted it...to go west and kill an Elk in the grandeur of the rockies.

    Or the stories and lineage of the Model 61. Or the Ithica 37....

    I have always told them that i, as well as my forefathers, would come back to haunt them if they ever sold those particular guns.

    I am thinking i DO need to write out the tales of these guns as they were told to me and put them in the folders i have started for each one containing owners manuals, spare parts, etc.

    But if they chose to sell the guns i have acquired, no big deal. But i dont see that happening as my kids (and wife) are already fighting over the guns i have bought, they love them just that much. The 1911, 686, M-4, M-44 so on and so forth...and i am a LONG way from being dead!
     
  5. fmj

    fmj Active Member

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    DUDE! It damn near killed me and sent me off into a place that took me many years to escape from when i watched the family farm. The thing i had been groomed my entire life to take over and run. Rusty old tractors that were no longer in service that i tore down and got running again, old time farm tools, that had been replaced with newer more modern tools, that I scrounged out of "junk" heaps, land that i had hoed, hunted, trapped, and hunted and otherwise improved. All divided up and sold at auction. All thats left of a once proud legacy are those guns!!

    John Cougars album "Scarecrow" and more importantly the song "Rain on the Scarecrow" STILL evokes serious emotions in me to this day. That album was released in 85, the farm was sold in 86.


    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=joNzRzZhR2Y[/ame]
     
  6. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    My family land was once over 1200 acres. It was subdivided among all the family members over the years. Many of them sold their share off. Now, the only person on that land is my Mom, 12 hours a day, helping to dig the coal out of it.

    Coal mine employees get first dibs at buying it back. They have enough put away in different funds to buy around 1k acres ;)

    Family land is going back into the family!
     
  7. fmj

    fmj Active Member

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    This is a good thing!

    We had right at 500 acres of the third richest soil in the world....its never coming back. :(
     
  8. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    It was planned. When we realized we wouldn't be able to keep our 100, my Mom immediately applied to work for them, just so she can get first crack at getting ALL of it back. And it's well understood that there is all that family land, and it may not be healthy to try and out bid us.
     
  9. fmj

    fmj Active Member

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    Good to hear you still have hope!
     
  10. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    It's almost a sure thing, but anything can happen. The folks she works with are a bunch of good ole boys just like us, so there's a mutual understanding. She's not the only one who took the job just to get a chance at reclaiming some family heritage. The employees with family land will likely be the lowest bidders, because there likely won't be anyone who will bid against them.

    IF it all goes as planned.
     
  11. masterPsmith

    masterPsmith New Member

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    Thats just irritating !!!!!
    Where is the identity of one's family without it's history. Items passed down in the family tell a history, whether that may be good or bad at times, it gives you a sense of where you came from and why you are here. These items, what ever they may be, should be cherished and preserved for the future generations of the family.


    Jim...................
     
  12. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    i agree with the family heritage thing. my father inhereted all my grandfathers guns, and one day they will come to me. now my grandfather saw guns as more of a tool than a hobby, very seldom hunted, and usually if he did it was squirrel hunting. the thing is i remember as a young child, my granfather teaching us to shoot that old 9 shot 22 revolver, him using that old 410 for killing snakes in the henhouse. not a lot of heritage, but definately fond memories of my grandfather. the guns are not high dollar and are not worth a lot of money, but the memories are priceless.
     
  13. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Master- that was hyperbole- better known as tongue in cheek.

    To the original poster- a very good point- and kudos to you.


    Because life is uncertain (if you want a guarantee, buy a toaster) I have a will. I also have some envelopes attached to the will, addressed to family members that I have left specific items to. Something on the order of "This is the shotgun that your great-grandmother used to shoot the dog that was attacking your grandma. Without this gun, it is possible that neither you nor I would have been here."

    Now, what they DO with what they inherit is THEIR call- it will belong to them when that time comes. But if they know about an item, chances that they will cherish it as much as you do goes up.

    FWIW, I have a TINY little revolver known as a Baby Hammerless. About the size of a business card, and totally useless. Love the fact that my step mom's grandmother was a dance hall girl back in the West, and this was HER gun! :D
     
  14. Fathead00

    Fathead00 New Member

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    I inherited my grandfathers rifle which is a Remington 721 30-06. I love shooting that rifle. My other family members were complaining that they didn't get the gun they wanted. I told them it didn't matter which gun it was, it belonged to grandpa that's all that matters!!!!
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2012
  15. ShagNasty1001

    ShagNasty1001 New Member

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    I was blessed enough to get my grandpas Remington 1100 that is in gorgeous condition and his Taurus .38spl. The 1100 was my first official gun that belonged to me and my first gun to go hunt with. As blessed and honored that I have it, I wish I didn't since that way my grandpa would still be here hunting with me
     
  16. TLuker

    TLuker Active Member

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    That's exactly the sort of stuff I was referring to. Now imagine if no one in your family knew those things. That would be really sad, and once that type of family history is lost its lost forever. Unfortunately, it just seems like lately I keep seeing that over and over. It's really sad that families are so disconnected. I was lucky enough to know those people and pass on a little information to their family, but I shouldn't of had to.:D

    It's really looking like the family as institution is about done for, and not just because of divorce or couples not getting married.
     
  17. mcb

    mcb New Member

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    I inherited four guns from my Uncle in 1995.

    My cousins and uncles squabled over his collection. Of probably 25-30 guns I got four. Two he set aside for me because they were his favorites a Winchester 101 12 gauge and a 6" Colt Trooper MKIII. I also have two that no one else grabbed a Taurus PT92 and a Jennings J22.

    To me everytime I shoot one it takes me back to the old strip mine where I used to shoot with my uncle and my dad.

    I still have all four even the Jennings. The relatives sold the rest for a quick buck. They could care less.
     
  18. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    That was the only thing my siblings agreed upon when my Dad passed. I got the firearms. They must have known the value. Not worth much at all, but I grew up w/ them and remember being w/ my Dad at the Flea market when he bought them. He spent $50.00 for a JC Higgins .22S L LR (Marlin 100), and a single shot Winchester Western Cooey 12ga goose gun. The Cooey is the odd one. They made 3 grades. If it is a mid grade it is worth 600.00. There were so many cross overs on serial numbers I have yet to find out what it really is. It is known as the punisher. It is a 3 piece travel gun. It will take your fillings out w/ 2 3/4" shells.
     
  19. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    J- know exactly what you mean. Dad passed away some years ago, but now and again the two of us will go for opening day of the season- I am using his BAR or his Fox 12 g. He would have liked that.
     
  20. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    my grandpa had just over 900 acres farmland/woods. when he died my dad didnt want to stick around and my uncle couldnt do it by himself. got split up and sold. at least my uncle retained about 40 acres. but still i wish i had run of the whole hill like they used to at my age.