scratches on my 1911

Discussion in '1911 Forum' started by 1911newbee, Jul 9, 2011.

  1. 1911newbee

    1911newbee New Member

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    hey guys,my 1911 is stainless,with the slide being polished and the rest of the gun being a flat finish.Is there anything i can use to fix the idiot marks i got on my first disassembly?not a big deal just getting tired of looking at them.also which cleaner would be best for overall care of the stainless?thanks.steven
     
  2. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    Been there, done that! I asked a lot of questions and did a lot of research, and the best response I heard was jeweler's rouge (sp?).

    Didn't try it, traded the pistol away to an uneducated newbie.....like I was at the time.

    Sorry to hear about it, but lots of us have been through it!
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2011

  3. neilage66

    neilage66 New Member

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    And there it is...right there in front of God and everybody...mocking you incessantly. ;)

    Yes, jeweler's rouge might do the trick or some fine rubbing compound.

    [sar] Break out the Dremel! [/casm]

    :D

    Good luck!
     
  4. Shihan

    Shihan Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    It doesn't bother me, it adds character. Goodness, It's a tool use it, don't display it. :D
     
  5. shipwreck

    shipwreck New Member

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    If its a polished part - like the way the stainless Springfield loaded models are - you can get a red scotchbright pad. You rub it back and forth, horizontally EVERY time - you basically rescratch a new grain into metal. You need to do both sides to make it look right.

    With a bead blasted finish on stainless, there is no fix other than getting it bead blasted again...

    As for future knowledge to keep it from happening again:

    For "idiot scratch" protection (what that scratch by the slide stop is called), I use this:

    Buy Now

    I previously had an Ed Brown 1911, and the slide stop went in very easily. But on my Custom Shop Springfield, that plunger makes the slide stop VERY hard to get in. EVERY Springfield (various model 1911s) I have previously owned was the same way. That slide stop won’t go in easily because of the plunger…

    So, because I DON’T wanna screw up even ONE single time on a $3k gun - I now use that protection device (I put the link above).

    I lay it (that small device) on the frame, and then use a small screwdriver to push in the plunger while I seat the slide stop. Then, pull out that plastic piece afterwards that protected the frame.

    I used to use scotch tape and some other tricks. But now, I just use this. As it is more reliable and works perfectly every time.
     
  6. IGETEVEN

    IGETEVEN New Member

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    Indeed. + 1

    Those are marks of character for a well used, comfortable, reliable and functioning, carried tool. :cool:
     
  7. shipwreck

    shipwreck New Member

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    IF its a gun I carry - I don't care if it gets scratched up. I have a few guns I carry. ANY carried gun will develop scratches.

    Guns I do not carry - I do not holster and try to keep looking as good as possible (minus regular shooting wear). However, after having 1911s for so long, the "idiot scratch" is the one scratch I go out of my way to prevent on any 1911 (carry gun or not)
     
  8. Olympus

    Olympus New Member

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    I personally don't think the Idiot Mark adds character to a 1911. It just tells me someone didn't fully know what they were doing when reassebling their gun.

    Best thing to do would be to blame in on the guy that owned the gun before you. Even if you're the original owner. :D
     
  9. shipwreck

    shipwreck New Member

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    +1000 :d:d:d
     
  10. IGETEVEN

    IGETEVEN New Member

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    Indeed. :) But who has tore down a 1911 in field situations, many shooting competition or handgun tactical operations classs, timed, under stress, cleaned it, got it together, functioned tested, loaded and back on target, without worry about scratching it and uses said guns for carry as well? :cool:

    [​IMG]
     
  11. kenhesr

    kenhesr New Member

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    Yep! What he said. :) Kinda like a scratch on a box mag or a safety gouge on an AK, shows its been used. Now with one of my "Pretty" weapons, it would be a whole different story.:eek:

    [​IMG]
     
  12. cddbrowns

    cddbrowns New Member

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    I have the same thing on my gold cup, and I was dumb enough to use some polishing compound and a polishing wheel on the rotary tool to try and get it out. NOW I have a really shinny part of the pistol, still a couple scratches and the rest a beautiful firearm. It still shoots straight and I will just have to drop it off somewhere and get refinished if I care enough to do so. Oh well.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2011
  13. ACRhino

    ACRhino New Member

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    My slide stop is a bit tricky to get in as well and I did indeed put my scratch on the frame, but it isn't bad. I use a little electrical tape now and a small screwdriver to depress the plunger.
     
  14. cddbrowns

    cddbrowns New Member

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    I have used the lube I use for my ar to slick that stop up. Used to be a pain to put in, now it just slides right in. Just a thought.
     
  15. Olympus

    Olympus New Member

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    Use your left thumb to brace against the bottom of the stop and use your right hand to push in with a little vertical pressure as well. In and up, bracing from the bottom with your other hand. Using this method, I've never put a single Idiot Scratch on any of the 1911s I've ever owned.