scope sighting in

Discussion in 'Optics & Mounts' started by nicky5251, Jan 14, 2012.

  1. nicky5251

    nicky5251 New Member

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    having trouble sighting in scope any suggestions never used scope before
     
  2. aaron48060

    aaron48060 New Member

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    Make sure everything is tight rail,rings,etc
     

  3. NOVA

    NOVA New Member

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    Need more info. What kind of scope, what kind of firearm? What are you sighting on, and at what distance? Are you shooting groups and then adjusting, or are you "chasing the scope"?
     
  4. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    btw. you posted this in the wrong section
     
  5. rizit

    rizit New Member

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    I started at 25-30 yards then gradually moved back that has seemed to help me. Get a target wade enough to see where you are to that helps a lot. I used a few poster sized cardboard. Have a friend spot ya to if you haven't.
     
  6. Shoobee

    Shoobee New Member

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    I like to set everything on the scope to the middle of the travel, windage wise, and then mount the scope in the middle of the hardware screws, using a laser boresighter, indoors. Then also with the laser boresighter, adjust the elevation so that the + is the exact height of the mounted scope over the bore on the wall about 10 ft away.

    That gives you a prefectly zeroed scope setting to start with. It will ensure that everything is set to center, and that you are on target with your first shot.

    You can use lock-tight or clear fingernail polish then to firmly set the screws, one at a time, once you know where they are supposed to be set. That is the second step. Once all the screws are lock-tight-ed, you can re-check the settings with the laser bore sighter again.

    Then go to the range and start close, but only adjust the L/R windage, as long as the high/low impact is on the target somewhere.

    Your first adjustments for drop should be at 100 yards, but at that distance you normally would want the impact about 1 to 2 inches high, depending on what distance you want to zero at. Most hunters zero at 250 to 300 yards.

    Note that with a 300 yd zero, your impact at 150 yds will be the highest on the target, which is the peak of the parabola of flight of the bullet.

    A bullet is like an arrow, it flies in an arc. Just a very small arc for the first few hundred yards.

    Fire 3 round groups, and take the center of the triangle they form, as your point of impact for adjustment. If the rounds touch, then you know that you have got a really good gun and/or you are a really "good" shooter. Rarely will they touch though, not without a lot of practice.

    Once the scope is set, then clean the rifle, and bring it back to the range the next day, and see where it fires on the first cold shot, to see if there is much if any of a difference. With some guns, there is a big difference. Other guns have little or no difference. With hunting, it is normally the first cold shot that matters.

    Once everything is set, at the range, the second time, then bring your gun home, and put the laser boresighter back on it, and see how far off it is from the theoretical center. There is usually a difference, since the bullet spin is like prop wash on a boat, and steers the bullet slightly down range.

    Then record everything, so that you can re-set this setting later on, and in subsequent years.

    That's how I bore sight my scoped .300 RUM.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2012
  7. firedawg60

    firedawg60 New Member

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    Tagging this for later.
     
  8. nicky5251

    nicky5251 New Member

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    shooting a rossi tri fecta .22 and 243 started at 25 yards the 22 is under the cross hairs cant seem to get them to meet the 243 not even on paper using a bsa 4x32 for the 22 and a bushnell 3-9x40 for the 243
     
  9. Shoobee

    Shoobee New Member

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    I would not expect both bullets to impact together ever.

    They have completely different ballistic coefficients and spin characteristics.
     
  10. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    I thought that there was a section in the optics or rifle area that explained how.

    This section is for suggestions to the FTF and how to make it better, or to report problems with the FTF.

    This subject does neither.
     
  11. topcat990

    topcat990 New Member

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    you can sight in a rifle in two shoots with a scope. you will need a solid bench rest that can hold the rifle without your support.

    1st place a target at either 25 or 50 yards. look up the balstics of the round you are shooting to see where you should place you bullet at at these ranges to acheive your desired final impact point.

    2nd with crosshair on the center of your target fire one round. note where the bullet hits on the target.

    3rd heres the trickey part. with a friend holding your gun soild into the rest and again aimed at the orignal aiming point now adjust the scope so that the crosshairs
    are now moved to where the bullet actually impacted the target. you must not allow the rifle to move while this is done. when the crosshairs are placed over where the bullet impacted the target you are sighted in.

    try another shot and you should be dead on...

    this method i learned back when ammo cost to much to just keep firing to get a sight in completed. you are now ready to shoot for a group.

    hope this helps

    terry
     
  12. Shoobee

    Shoobee New Member

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    Even before all this, you need to mount the scope properly.

    Then if you are going to use the above method, you would need a gun vice.

    Lock the rifle into the vice, before you move the cross hairs.

    Only 2 rounds is a theoretical ideal. It's going to take a whole lot more than just 2.
     
  13. topcat990

    topcat990 New Member

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    this can be done in just two shots! if you are going to shoot to see a group i agree this method will only get you on target quickly. if you want a quick sight in this works. try it with a .22 rimfire and a scope. you will find that your next shot will be in the bull. you can fine yune it from their. i have used this method for over 30 years and it will get you in the bull in only two shots. this is a set up for hunting, not benchrest. please try it as you will be suprised and hopefully pleased...

    terry
     
  14. Shoobee

    Shoobee New Member

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    Yup, that's exactly what you said before.

    But, again, it depends on how well you mounted your scope with hardware to begin with, and where the windage travel screw(s) is/are set, to begin with.

    In other words, lets say that your windage adjustment on the scope was already pre-set all the way to the left, and then you mounted the scope with hardware and the scope now points all the way to the right.

    Then there is no way on God's Green Earth that you will be able to move the impact, after you fire your 2 rounds. These bullets will then head off into the next county on your left (to the west, if you are shooting north, away from the sun).

    So therefore --

    Step #1 - center the windage travel in the scope;

    Step #2 - mount the scope with hardware and center it on the gun, using a laser insert into the barrel;

    Step #3 - lower or raise the impact of the laser dot on your wall so that it is the same distance above your bore as your scope index is above your gun;

    Step #4 - NOW you can fire your 2 shots, like you said, or 3 shot groups, like I said.

    Savvy, Pirate?
     
  15. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Take the 243 barrel off the rifle. make sure you have the scope properly mounted. Clamp the barrel if you can in a place where you can see a good distance, about 100 yards. look down the bore at a target and align the cross hairs to the same spot. The barrel is now bore sighted. This will get you on paper. Remount the barrel and fire a round at the target. Adjust the scope and fire a group. Single shots dont tell the story unless you have an exceptionally accurate rifle.
     
  16. topcat990

    topcat990 New Member

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    you are correct! i just took this for granted that the shooter had already performed this task. in fact i ran into this exact problem with a just purchased remington 541-s. the scope came out of the box with all of its travel maxed out high, and left. i had to center the cross hairs then use the two shot method to get onto the target. then i began shooting for groups. this rifle shoots eley target ammo the best. still does well with some of the wallmart cheap stuff as well. thanks for clairfing. i think now a anew shooter has most of the data needed to sight in a new rifle.

    thanks

    terry
     
  17. topcat990

    topcat990 New Member

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    question? why take the barrel off of the rifle?

    thanks

    terry
     
  18. Shoobee

    Shoobee New Member

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    This is called the visual method of bore-sighting. It is used for artillery and tank cannons in the military.

    You can save yourself the grief of disassembly & reassembly simply by buying an inexpensive laser boresighting kit.
     
  19. Shoobee

    Shoobee New Member

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    List of the very first things they teach you in boot camp in the military:

    1 - from now on you worthless maggots will speak only when spoken to;

    2 - and the first and last words out of your stinking mouths will be sir;

    3 - do you maggots understand that?

    4 - I can't hear you sound off like you've got a pair;

    5 - never assume because it makes an ass-u-me spell it and see.

    :D
     
  20. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    He has a Rossi Tri Fecta. It is a single shot break action and only 1 screw to remove and swap the barrels. If it had been a bolt action I would have told him to remove the bolt and look down the barrel. I figured he did not have anything to colimate the scope.