Scope selection for ar15

Discussion in 'AR-15 Discussion' started by Kenner1223, May 30, 2013.

  1. Kenner1223

    Kenner1223 New Member

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    I have just shot my ar15 for the first time and I find that my old eyes have trouble with the 100yd + targets. I will need a scope of some kind. I would also like a scope that I can use in the dusk. Also, can you recommend any sites to visit for accessory items for the rifle. Any suggestions please
     
  2. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    Magpul makes a lot of accessories, as well as Tapco, Troy, etc....

    Try getting in google images and typing in AR-15 accessories and see what appeals to your eye. Once you find something of interest I can help you find a better price

    The general rule of thumb is, the higher the cost of scopes, the better they see at dusk. How much are you wuilling to spend?
     

  3. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    For dusk, you will need a scope that is x50. For night time you will need x56. The bigger the lens, the more light that comes in. 3-9 x 50/56 is all you need for that range. Plus, you can go about 300 yards further. For over 300 yards, I would go with a 4-12 magnification.
     
  4. purehavoc

    purehavoc New Member

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    Decent quality glass is the key , you dont need a monster objective , even with a 1-4X24 if its decent quality glass you will still be good at dusk . Thats what I use out to 300 yards and dusk is not a problem beyond that I dont have range to shoot unless the corn and beans are down then we can go out to 600 . If you plan on going out to 500 I suggest a 3x9-40 or 44 . Again of good quality

    Nikon Monarch African 1x4-20 clearer than any of my other scopes even in low light

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2013
  5. bclark1

    bclark1 New Member

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    How much were you willing to spend on the scope and accessories. There is tons of different accessories, What caliber, what will yiu use this ar for?
     
  6. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    Kinda right, but kinda not Jager... because the light still has to go through a 1 inch or 30mm tube, so its lost in the transmission again. What does make a big difference is the argon gas coatings on the lenses to reproduce that pure light. Thats why the swarvoskis, zeiss, and all the top end leupolds, etc etc all cost so much, because its a hard process to make a piece of glass perfect with so many coatings on it.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2013
  7. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    Insert shameless plug photo here:

    my 250 dollar vortex viper works pretty good in low light, but if I was using the gun in time of war, i'd invest in something even more expensive
    [​IMG]
     
  8. bclark1

    bclark1 New Member

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    If your ar-15 is in 223/556 the nikon m223 scopes are excellent. They come with drop reticles already calibrated for the 223/556. My m223 scope performs moderetly well at dusk And is very clear well past 400 yards in the day. Zeiss also makes many scopes that perform well in low light conditions.
     
  9. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    Sorry, I will have to disagree. I can tell a big difference between my x56 scope and my friends x50 scope while dusk/night hunting. My friend went out and bought a 2000 dollar x56 scope when he saw the difference. Our scopes are expensive and the quality glass does make a difference. You are right about the glass. I will stick with my advise of buying a 3-9 magnification for a more precise shot and the needed extra power to insure what you are shooting at at dusk. I have been a night hunter for some time and have experienced the necessity of a larger quality lens.
     
  10. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    a good quality glass with a 40 mm objective will appear bright than a 55mm objective with a crappy glass ;)

    Its the quality of the glass that makes the difference. It is not always a size thing with you guys! :p
     
  11. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I heard this long ago.

    With a Bushnell scope, you can see there is a man on the other side of the lake.

    With a Leupold, you can see that he is smoking a cigar.

    With a Schmidt & Binder, you can see what brand of cigar.:)
     
  12. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    You failed to mention the 4th line of that Locutus......

    With a Sako, you can light that cigar for him! lol
     
  13. kbd512

    kbd512 Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Jager, just curious, but is it possible that what you experienced was the result of a smaller exit pupil given the objective size and magnification setting of the scope in question?

    If you were working with a variable power scope and you turned down the magnification to make optimal use of the exit pupil diameter for the light conditions you were in, did you see a brighter or more sharply contrasted (clearer) image?

    Higher quality glass that transmits more light to your eye will obviously make a difference, but two scopes with the same magnification and different size objectives will transmit a varying diameter image, and thus varying amounts of light, through the ocular.

    I think human pupil dilation diameter ranges somewhere between 2MM and 8MM. Any scope that has an exit pupil diameter optimized to transmit the light that forms the image between 6MM to 8MM is probably going to be better for low light environments.

    If it were me and I absolutely needed magnifying optics, to save money and have a higher quality optic, I'd select a fixed magnification scope with an objective diameter and magnification value that would transmit the largest image that my pupil was capable of taking in under the expected lighting conditions.

    Any variable magnification optic that performs as well as a fixed magnification optic with the same general specifications is going to cost a lot more money for the same level of quality.

    If the scope were for 300 yards on in, I'd think a 6X scope would work.

    The types of optical distortion you'd run into with lower quality scopes really aren't all that apparent at closer targets, but the contrast/sharpness/clarity of the image are pretty apparent at any distance.

    - If shooting in low light, consider the exit pupil diameter for the magnification level of the scope

    - Don't buy variable magnification scopes that aren't first focal plane if you intend to use a MIL or MOA reticle for what it was designed for

    - Variable magnification means a lot more is going on inside the scope and to achieve the same level of optical performance you have to spend a lot more money

    - If you want to spend less than 1K for a high quality scope, then variable magnification is not for you

    - The best scope in the world won't do you much good if you use a cheap mount, which is to say any mount that doesn't stay put or is improperly machined- don't spend 2K on a scope and put it in a $50 mount

    - Properly mounting the scope is important at extended ranges- just as canting your rifle can cause your shot to fall someplace other than where intended a canted scope can cause the same problem

    - If you're shooting at targets at varying ranges, then repeatable and true windage and elevation adjustments are a must

    - Illumination of the reticle certainly helps in low light, but clear and bright images are the most helpful

    Apart from that, try a few before you buy one