Scope for a .300 WSM - Nikon 4-12x40 - Nikoplex or BOC?

Discussion in 'Optics & Mounts' started by SubZero, Nov 5, 2012.

  1. SubZero

    SubZero New Member

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    I'm looking to change from a 3-9x40 Nikon Prostaff to a 4-12x40 Nikon Prostaff for my .300 WSM, as I'll be doing some longer distance shooting.

    I am not sure of what specific advantages the BDC may have over the Nikoplex when reaching out from about 300 to 600 yards and was hoping someone could provide some insight.

    I'd appreciate helpful replies.

    Thanks
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2012
  2. Marlinman

    Marlinman New Member

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    It has yardage markers for most basic magnum cartridges. First dot down is like 300, next is like 400, 600 and such. If you look up the reticle it will tell you precisely. It allows you to know pretty close where to hold over wo having to rough guess on where to put the reticles.
     

  3. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Well-Known Member

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    I bought a Nikon Monarch years ago when they first came out with a BDC reticle for my Ruger #1 300WM. It took a lot of time shooting the rifle at different ranges to find out where each O mark in the scope really shot at. IMO,All of these types of scopes are just an advertising ploy.
    I would rather just know my ballistics for the bullet I'm shooting,and dial in the scope to whatever range it needed to be adjusted to.I can do that just as fast.

    My choice would be for the Nikonplex reticle,and then learn your ballistics for your gun.
     
  4. Marlinman

    Marlinman New Member

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    Exactly. Either learn your ballistics or get a GOOD mildot.
     
  5. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    the BDC has its place and when it works out right can be great. if your not willing to spend tons of hours shooting at different distances, using lots of ammo. its probly the better idea to learn your rifle, and get the nikoplex.
     
  6. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    The problem w/ most, if not all BDC scopes is the horizontal lines intended to show different distances cover the target basicly making them useless. Shepard makes a better system that still allows you to see your target, alhough is is in no way perfect.
     
  7. Marlinman

    Marlinman New Member

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    Bushnells DOA reticle is better as well.
     
  8. bman940

    bman940 Member

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    Sub, If you utilize Nikon's Spot On Ballistic Program, it will give you very accurate distance for your BDC circles when you enter all your shooting data into the program. Best of all it's free. Go to Nikonhunting.com, click Spot On, register ( over 1,000,000 registered users), enter your data and away you go. I have used Nikon's BDC reticle scope since it came out 8 years ago, Spot On makes it much more acurate. I have them on all of my hunting rifles now. Once you range a target, choosing the correct circle is easy. Thus far my longest shot is 427 yards. 1 shot stop on Ks. whitetail. The PROSTAFF 4-12 BDC is what I have on my son's and father in law's rifles. Both did very well last year with multiple deer and all 1 shot stops. Check out Spot On, I think you will be impressed. The subtension of the circle is 1.5 inches at 100 yards or 6 inches at 400 yards. I hope this post helps ?

    http://i1216.photobucket.com/albums/dd363/bman940/brycendave2011deer.png
     
  9. SubZero

    SubZero New Member

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    Thanks for the feedback.

    I was looking at a Prostaff today and they also showed me a Monarch, which had a side "focus / distance" adjustment knob on it.

    I really did not understand what that did. Is it some kind of range-finder?

    Lots to learn before I make a final choice.
     
  10. AsSeenOnTV

    AsSeenOnTV New Member

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    Last edited: Nov 19, 2012
  11. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    the "knob" you are refering to is called a parallax adjustment... if the parallax or focus as you will, is not correct it could can effect how you see the crosshairs.. in some cases the target could appear in front of the crosshairs, instead of the way it should be. this can be helpful when shooting very close, and very long distances.
     
  12. SubZero

    SubZero New Member

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  13. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    lol.. sometimes the guy behind the counter doesnt always have all the anwsers
     
  14. SubZero

    SubZero New Member

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    Cabelas aint' full of experts sometimes.

    One guy said that if you focus using that dial and it's clear, if you look at the number on the side of the dial, that is the approximate distance to the target.

    He was saying that with the combination of that range and the BDC, you should be able to find which circle to use to center on your target.

    But he was about the only guy that sounded like he knew anything, and he was going on lunch. lol...

    I thought a 4-12 would do but they were like - no - go 4x16 or 5x20, and I was like - would that really help anything? The other guys did not really have an answer. Should have waited for the old dude to get back from lunch.
     
  15. AsSeenOnTV

    AsSeenOnTV New Member

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    Last edited: Nov 19, 2012
  16. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    nice... magnifacation is your choice.. depends on how close you feel you need to zoom in on a target. generally most good scopes over 10x have a parallax adjustment. some even have it on the 3x9..
    just remember, the more you zoom in, the shakier your scope/rifle will be, and also your field of view will be smaller... you are on the right track.. go to some places. hold and look through several brands. research online, and ofcourse ask here :cool:
     
  17. SubZero

    SubZero New Member

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    Great advice. Much appreciated.

    One guy at the counter said a lot of people that get the higher zoom shoot from a fixed point, like a shooting stand on the ground or up in a tree.

    I'm not nearly that involved. Why would I want to sit at what basically looks like a school desk with rifle rests on it when I'm out in the field?

    I felt like I was on a different planet.

    I did not know enough to tell of they were BS'ing me or telling me things that were not quite accurate or even true.

    It all "sounds" good, but do I want to spend $500 on a scope without finding out for certain?
     
  18. AsSeenOnTV

    AsSeenOnTV New Member

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    Last edited: Nov 19, 2012
  19. AsSeenOnTV

    AsSeenOnTV New Member

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    Last edited: Nov 19, 2012
  20. SubZero

    SubZero New Member

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    I thought a 4-12x40 would do at first - the Prostaff.

    But they mentioned 4-16x42 and 5-20x44 Monarch.

    I didn't feel comfortable with the size of the 50's I saw, and thought 44 might be about as high as I could possibly go without feeling it was too big.

    I have a 3-9x40 Prostaff and like it a lot, so that is why I was thinking another Prostaff. But I guess their job is to upsell, at least in part.