Scariest + most awesome day.

Discussion in 'Range Report' started by kaido, Feb 6, 2012.

  1. kaido

    kaido New Member

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    As it states, today was not only the scariest time going to the range, but also one of the best time so far.

    To start off, let's go with the scariest part of the day.
    Me and my girl were able to take a friends rifle out, I'm not to sure if it actually is or not, but says it is in fact a Remington 700.
    The gun it's self isn't in to bad I shape, especially the stock.
    The entire rifle is at least 30~ years old.

    To get to the "good" part of this freaky story, I was sighting it in and everything was going just fine. Least for the first two shots.
    The third round chambered jut fine with out a hitch at all, here's where it get interesting. I pulled the trigger, nothing. I thought maybe I left the safety on so checked, it was off but to make sure I flicked it on then back off, still nothing. Since my only other thought was that I might of some how not cycled it properly, I popped the bolt up then locked it back down. That let the round fly down range. Being a little iffy, I cycled for the fourth round and once again, nothing. Figuring it would be the same issue, I went for the bolt, with out even so much as a finger in the trigger guard, let alone near it, the rifle went off. Needles to say, I'm not a fan of having a 7mm Rem Mag firing when ever it feels like, so that got unloaded (dropped the floor plate) and put away pretty quick.

    Now, the best part of the day, least in my eyes.
    When me and my girl got down there there was already a few people down there doing their own thing. Me being the guy that I am, I noticed someone had an M14 out. Now since that is one of my all time favorite rifles of all time, I had to see if he was alright with me shooting a couple round though it.

    He gave me the okay as we'll as two loaded 5round mags (max round count for Canada per mag -_- ) as well as a quick run down since I told him I had never fired one before. After showing me where the mag release, safety and bolt locks are he pretty much told me to go have fun. Needles to say, I felt like a kid in a candy shop, it's by far the coolest firearm I've ever shot in my life.


    The smallest group is my second mag, its also after I got used to the trigger. Sadly it was only done at 25yards. He had a scope mounted but I only cought the fact it was a 3-9 and that's it.

    All in all I think I did good since before that I've only fired a couple of .22LRs, two 12gauges and that 7mm. (which I refuse to fire at all until he shows me that it's totally clean.)

    (would also just like to say that I still had to 7mm shouldered and pointing downrange when it discharged)
     

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  2. AleksiR

    AleksiR New Member

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    Sounds like a good trip to the range, excluding that incident with the 7mm Mag. From what you described, it sounds like you were getting hang fires (the powder doesn't ignite immediately after the primers been hit). Were you shooting old ammo in that Remington? Good thing you were pointing the muzzle downrange, but if the rifle doesn't fire after you pull the trigger you should always wait for atleast a minute or so, pointing the muzzle to a safe direction of course (as you did).
     

  3. kaido

    kaido New Member

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    It very well could of been a hang fire, but I don't remember hearing the pin hitting the primer at all. As of the ammunition, that very well could of played a part since yesterday it was firing when pulled.
    I was using Winchesters PowerPoint SPs and the casing looked to be fairly different from round to round. Some looked brand new while otheres, from that same box, looked as though they've been sitting there for a little while. There was what looked like rusting/oxidizing in the base stamp of some and real small sports on the case it self. I figured it wouldn't be a problem since the gun was doing just fine yesterday.

    I did think about the hang fire afterwards though. Even now (close to 6 hours later) it still surprises me and make me glad I have a decent amount of smarts when it comes to firearms.
     
  4. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    Highly unlikely to have TWO hang fires back to back. That combined with your mention of not hearing a click when you pulled the trigger but having both rounds detonated when you touched the bolt handle makes me think you've got an internal malfunction in the striker firing system.

    Fouling, corosion, and brass shavings around the pin and pin spring can prevent it from snapping forward and striking the primer. I suggest you try to re-create the failure while dry firing. If the rifle is cocked, trigger is pulled, and you get no click or a delayed click after manipulating the bolt, you've got a problem. Given the age of the rifle you should have a competent person diseasemble the firing mechanism and clean/replace parts if necessary.

    Personally, I would have stopped firing after the first malfunction but good on you for being savvy enough to keep it pointed I'm a safe direction.

    Oh...and FYI...I highly doubt the other shooters rifle was an M14. M14's are select fire, both semi and full auto capable. The civilian semi auto clone is known as the M1A. Looks identical but no rock and roll switch.

    Tack
     
  5. kaido

    kaido New Member

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    I figured I should of put it away after the first failure, but I was thinking it might of been human error since I'm still fairly new to the shooting sport. Even though it's kind if hard to mess up while using a bolt action as far as mechanics goes. The second one I knew for sure wasn't do to something that I had done and that it was in fact the rifle. I'll be sure to let the owner of it (a good friend of mine) know about recreating the issue with out anything being chambered. However soon as I mentioned it to him, he said that he's been looking into buying a new bolt and thinks that might fix it.

    I knew it wasn't an actual M14, but it was a clone. Regardless of lacking the "Rock 'n' roll switch" it was still a blast to shoot and I'm thinking of getting one now. Haha
     
  6. Durangokid

    Durangokid New Member

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    The 700 Remington has had this problem from the begining. There have been a number of deadly accidents with this rifles saftey problem. They have paid the largest settlements ever paid by a firearms co. There was a one hour TV Doc. made on this very problem. The Engineer who designed this rifle testified against the dangers of his own design. :rolleyes:
     
  7. kaido

    kaido New Member

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    Damn, that's some crazy stuff. I was thinking it might just be this one rifle and not the type. I'll be sure to let him (gonna call him Jack on here) know that this type of rifle has seen this issue from the start. I also think I'll look around and see if I can find this Doc floating around the web at all.
     
  8. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    The M1A is on my short list also. IMHO it's sill the best semi auto sniper system out there short of a Barret M82A1 .50 BMG and with 4 kids I don't see myself dropping $8500 on the Barret anytime soon.

    Tack
     
  9. Marlinman

    Marlinman New Member

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    They actually havent had that many problems if you take out the "gunsmiths" jacking with them. The engineer even said so. He said the design was to easy for someone to tamper w

    God didnt make all men equal colonel Sam Colt did
     
  10. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    I heard somewhere that about 1% out of 100 rifles tested had this problem, (though, the actual percentage is probably less) (I think they have pretty much fixed that problem now though, it seems to happen more in their older 700s.) and as Marlinman said, it can also be caused by "gunsmiths" screwing around with the internals, and making a mistake. a few replacements should hopefully fix it. You could also try calling Remington, I don't know what they would do, but it could end up helping you.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2012
  11. 007BondJamesBond007

    007BondJamesBond007 New Member

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    I had that happened to me. I sent the gun back to Remington and they replaced the trigger. Not sure if that fixed it and will be careful cycling the bolt.
     
  12. Magnaiter

    Magnaiter New Member

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    My cousin had the same problem jus after buy'n the gun. He had some problems with send'n it back an it do'n the same as before when he got the gun. He traded it off but we stay far away from the 700s but not all seem 2 have a problem have a few friends that have no problems what so ever.
     
  13. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    sometimes the problem with the M700's is lack of proper cleaning and maintenance, then also some wannabe "gunsmith" adjusting the trigger pull, and not properly doing a safety check afterwards. of the many, many M700's i have owned over the years, i have never personally had this problem. the remington M700 is one of the safest rifles there is, IMO. using proper gun safety practices, if you were to have that one in a million bad M700, will keep everyone safe. the most important safety feature of any firearm, is the person handling it.
     
  14. kaido

    kaido New Member

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    I'll be sure to pass your guys advice off to Jack, that way he can get it all figured out. I'll also suggest he cleans it, even though I already did when I returned the rifle to him.

    If none of that works, I know for sure that he has a gunsmith/seller that he likes going to, so if he doesn't already have thoughts too, I'll suggest that too.
     
  15. Chandler51

    Chandler51 New Member

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    I'd have the rifle inspected, as Tack advised.

    You just proved how even when faced with an unsafe situation, the rules of firearm safety work. 100% of the time. Great job.

    As to your target, that's some purty good shootin' there, cowboy. :)
     
  16. kaido

    kaido New Member

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    I'm thinking it really just needs a good cleaning. Jack has told me that he doesn't clean his .22 until it begins to have troubles feeding. I should of taken that as a sign that he may treat all his firearms in a similar manner.

    But I do agree, if you follow them, the rules work very well indeed.

    Haha thanks.
    Just wish I was able to push the target farther out by since the owner placed it at the 25yard table, I didn't wunna be a butt head move it to another spot. I am for sure getting one.....just need to save the money up first.
     
  17. mjkeat

    mjkeat New Member

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    True.

    It has been lab tested and a few suits settled out of court.

    This was a problem in the past and a reason for the new X trigger.
     
  18. Durangokid

    Durangokid New Member

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    This has nothing to do with cleaning or gunsmiths. This has been an on going problem with this rifle. I had it happen while hunting Javalina some years ago. The rifle was not dirty and no gunsmith had worked on it. Make all the excuses you like but if you have a 700 becareful with it.:(
     
  19. mjkeat

    mjkeat New Member

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    But I refuse to do any research myself so I'm going to continue to draw assumptions of my own. Never mind all the documented proof available to anyone not to lazy to look.

    And don't you dare say such things about my Remington!

    (sarcasm)
     
  20. kaido

    kaido New Member

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    That's a little bit of a let down, I was actually hoping to get one at some point. Only thing I didn't like about it, not counting that accidental/random discharge, was that the 7mm has to much kick for my liking. The recoil pad did help out a whole heck of a lot though.