Saying Origin?

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by MCarter788, Dec 10, 2013.

  1. MCarter788

    MCarter788 New Member

    208
    0
    0
    What is the origin of the saying Kentucky Crosswinds? I understand what it means, but why Kentucky? Does it have some crazy cross winds there? Or is there some kind of historical reference to it?
     
  2. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

    7
    2
    0
    actually it's Kentucky windage. IIRC, it means to estimate the wind downrange and adjust accordingly.
     

  3. MisterMcCool

    MisterMcCool Well-Known Member Supporter

    12,828
    150
    63
    Perhaps it is in reference to the "Kentucky rifle?"
     
  4. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

    6,925
    53
    48
    Kentucky windage is adjusting your side to side point of impact by guessing where you need your point of aim to be to achieve that point of impact without adjusting the sights. It could be to compensate for crosswinds on a long shot. Early precision marksmen used rifles instead of muskets, many of the early riflemen came from the hill country around Virginia, Tennessee, and Kentucky, as well as Pennsylvania. One of the more popular firs of rifle was the Kentucky Rifle which may have had a smaller bore and thus shot lighter bullets that could be more affected by the wind. Early sights didn't have a quick easy way to adjust side to side compensation or windage, some had some elevation adjustment, though most did not.

    Put it all together and the origin is probably somewhere in there.
     
  5. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

    6,489
    0
    0
    The Primitive sights on the early American Rifle AKA Kentucky rifle were not adjustable. The rifles were zeroed at maybe 50 yards. On targets beyond that the shooter had to know where the rifle "Threw" the ball and hold off right or left to compensate for distance. The rifle shot a patched round ball and would "Yaw" or drift according to the pitch of the rifling.
    The hold over for drop was refereed to as Tennessee elevation. Humm? On that one your guess is as good as mine?:confused:
     
  6. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

    6,925
    53
    48
    My post was mostly speculation based on multiple clues.

    Now if you want to know how the phrase "Cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey", is a nautical term, I can tell you for sure.
     
  7. vincent

    vincent New Member

    4,123
    0
    0
    Run with it Doc!!

    *grabs popcorn and prepares to be regailed yet again with origins of nautical terms* :)
     
  8. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

    6,925
    53
    48
    Back in the days of wooden ships and iron men...

    On the gun decks cannon balls were arranged in pyramid shaped stacks on s brass plate with indentations or holes cut in them to keep the foundation layer of cannon balls from rolling around as the ship would pitch in the sea. These plates were referred to as brass monkeys. Brass and iron being metals if differing densities would expand and contract at different rates as temperatures would change. Brass contracts considerably more and faster than iron. When temps got cold enough the holes or indentations would contract to a small enough diameter that they would force the still larger iron balls up and off the plate, sending them rolling around the gun deck. Thus the weather had gotten cold enough to freeze the balls off of a brass monkey.

    Learned while touring the USS Constitution in Boston Harbor.
     
  9. forrest225

    forrest225 New Member

    103
    0
    0
    I believe it has something to do with Kentucky being the best state, and all the other states wanting to be it.



    :p
     
  10. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

    6,925
    53
    48
    Or being aware of which way the wind is blowing so you aren't down wind of all the horse ranches there.

    Blue grass doesn't smell any sweeter after its been through a thoroughbred.
     
  11. forrest225

    forrest225 New Member

    103
    0
    0
    I don't smell the horses, just the dairy farm down the road.
     
  12. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

    6,489
    0
    0
    The term "Kentucky" during the time of the Over the Mountain Men referred to any Frontiersman. Lewis & Clark had a number of "Kentucky" hunters on their expeditions. These woodsmen were recruited in Southern Illinois.The term Kentucky rifle in todays speech would be a wilderness rifle.
    It may be of interest? The Common Wealth of Kentucky during the Jacksonian era passed some of the first most restrictive gun laws. They were so bad the Common Wealth was sued and lost to the Supreme court. The "Right to Keep and Bear Arms" was returned to the residents of Kentucky. Sounds like some of the states today.:(
     
  13. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

    3,937
    0
    0
    I always suspected that was the case since the term Kentucky was used so often before the state even existed. Thanks for adding that. :)