Savage Arms Model 69R-H Information

Discussion in 'General Shotgun Discussion' started by Gh0st, Mar 10, 2014.

  1. Gh0st

    Gh0st New Member

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    I snagged a Savage Arms Model 69R-H today and I'm having some trouble finding any solid information about the gun. I haven't fired it yet, but from what I can tell it is mechanically sound. There are some scratches on the stock and fore end, but nothing that can't be fixed with some sand paper and stain.

    What little bit of information I have found about the gun is that it is similar to the Savage Model 67, which was used as a trench gun in Vietnam. I've also read that the 69R model was more frequently used by police departments. There is no serial number on the gun, just the manufacturer's information. From what I've read, that means it was manufactured before 1969.

    I admit I was going to try and modernize it (aka - make it tacticool), and make it my primary HD gun, but I would rather restore it to resemble it's trench gun heritage (if my research is correct). I was hoping to find a manual about the gun, or really anything that would help me identify how old the gun is, and what exactly I can do as far as restoring it. I should note that this will be my first restoration project, unless you count when I had to help my dad refinish and re-blu our hunting rifles after they got fire damaged.

    Any information would be greatly appreciated, and hopefully I can post the restoration process once I feel comfortable getting started. I've attached a couple of pictures also.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     

  2. Gh0st

    Gh0st New Member

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  3. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    Restoring that gun is destroying the gun. Wipe the gun down with Old English scratch remover for light colored woods and call it a day, the gun is in good shape now. There is nothing you can do to raise the value of the gun. Refinishing the shotgun will give it a value of $75. The gun would have a bayonet lug if it was military issue.
     
  4. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    if the gun isn't a prized family heirloom or a rare model, restoring it isn't going to lessen it's value if done correctly and to period condition. i personally would refrain from trying to make it "tacticool" in any way. simple restoration of the wood and metal, bact to period condition would be all i would to it.

    you have a nice looking shotgun that would serve you quite well in it's original configuration. if the want or need to make a more "tactical" looking shotgun, please choose someing newer and more common.
     
  5. Virginian

    Virginian Active Member

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    Restoring by definition is restoring it to the way it left the factory. I think it is that way now, with a little wear. I think you want to modify it to tacticool. Get a Mossberg or an 870. You will find the experience MUCH easier due to availability of parts.
     
  6. Gh0st

    Gh0st New Member

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    I was planning on refinishing the wood, replacing the missing sling mount and sling, and that's about it. The metal is in decent shape and doesn't need to be reblued at this time.

    I stated in the original ppost that I decided against modernizing it...

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I317 using Firearms Talk mobile app
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2014
  7. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    Once you strip the old finish you will want to sand the stock. It is so easy to round off the ends of the stock so the wood no longer fits the recoil pad or the receiver. It's hard to use a sanding block properly because there are no flat surfaces on a shotgun stock.

    Gunsmiths do not sand gun stocks, they soda blast or blast it with dry ice. After the gunsmith soda blasts the stock they use a scribe to carefully remove any of the old finish from the checkering. It takes a steady hand to avoid marring the checkering.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2014
  8. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    i have used nothing more than liquid paint stripper, along with steel wool and a old stiff toothbrush for stripping the finish on wood stocks. the same technique used by many gunsmiths to refinish wood stocks, for a good many years. works quite well.