Savage 110

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by SmokyMtnHiker, Feb 25, 2013.

  1. SmokyMtnHiker

    SmokyMtnHiker New Member

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    Ok, my FFL has, im assuming his, an old Savage 110 chambered 30-06 with a bi-pod and scope. It's only had approx. 150 round shot through it. Now I'm unclear of the scope brand and power; its sight unseen. However, this guy doesnt really look at selling Arms as a profit; he's a retired state trooper. So, im pretty sure its in decent shape. He takes care of his guns.

    He is asking $450. With the limited knowledge given does this price sound good?
     
  2. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    May be somewhere in the ballpark, depending on condition, and depending on the scope. In this case, a LOT would depend on the scope. Is it a $49 walMart special (made in slave labor factory # 279) or is a a higher $$$ bit of glass?
     

  3. RUG3R44

    RUG3R44 New Member

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    really????!!!
     
  4. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    I agree with C3. If it has a good quality scope and Quality Name Brand Rings on it like a Leupold, Nikon or other top of the line scope and mounts it is a decent buy. If it has a cheap scope on it that is a little high. And then you have to consider the condition. Look at the face of the Bolt at the firing pin hole. With only 150 rounds fired through it the finish on the bolt should still be in tact and not show hardly any signs of wear. If it shinny then you know the rest of the story. Good Luck!

    03
     
  5. Catfish

    Catfish New Member

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    I`m a Savage fan and have several 110`s. I would give $ 200 for the rifle and tell you to keep the scope. I do only buy cheap ones. If it were a Leupold Vari X 11 I would pay $ 400 for it. The by-pod is worth another $ 40 to $ 60 depending on brand and height. You should have not trouble getting $ 250 to $ 275 for the rifle only. At least here in Ohio at the gun shows I`ve been going to.
     
  6. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Savage rifles that predate about 4-5 years ago stay AWAY from them. The newer production rifles are fantastic. The older stuff is total junk. That is the 1980's 90's and early 2000's
     
  7. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    Seriously?? Why??
     
  8. mchoitz

    mchoitz New Member

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    That explains why I don't like mine as much as everyone else likes their
     
  9. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I didn't know of any difference other than the accutrigger, which is very nice.
     
  10. hiwall

    hiwall Active Member

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    My 110 from the early 80's could not possibly be a better gun. Nice walnut with cut checkering and 3" groups at 400 yards. What else could you want?
     
  11. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    This is inaccurate.

    Just stay away from the 110 that has the soldered scope bases. They're never straight.

    Both my 7mmRM and 243 fall into the dates you said were junk. Alas, they're not.
     
  12. Holmes375

    Holmes375 New Member

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    Oh, baloney.

    Some of the earlier triggers were pretty bad and the econo-style synthetic stocks are definitely from the Gumby factory but these are oft changed components by serious shooters anyway. And these issues apply only to the least expensive Savage models.

    Many of the earlier wood stocked rifles offered super performance for a workin' man's budget with a good wood stock and an acceptable trigger.

    The Accu-trigger and Accu-stock now offered by Savage addresses previous shortcomings very well and they're still affordable.

    I'm just finishing up a speed goat rifle using a Savage 111 Hunter purchased second hand. Wanted a good 500 yard rifle that was still easy to pack about the prairie. Added a 3-10 mil/mil scope on a pic rail with good rings, a Rifle Basix trigger that breaks like glass at 2#, a nice Hogue stock and a custom bolt handle for under $800 total. Its a 25-06 that shoots like a dream and goes under 9# with sling. Just what the doctor ordered for this ageing wanderer :)

    I've long used Winchester 70s for hunting and Remington 700s for the long range stuff but this crappy ol' Savage has made a believer outta me.
     
  13. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    Considering,I have a whole bunch of Savage rifle's-JonM does have a good point. Savage rifle's made before 1988 were known to be cheap/not so good rifles.
    But the rifle's that were produced after the bankruptcy of the company have been some of the best shooting factory rifles made.

    All Savage rifles were a 110 model (Long Action's) until 1998,that's when they started making the Short Action receivers-Model 10/11/12/14/16. But the 110 models that shot short action calibers were/are very good shooting rifles.

    The only bad actions that I've ever known Savage to make,were the one's with the factory mounts cast on the action.These were known to be horrible,the mounts almost always got twisted when the action's were heat treated,and you couldn't get a scope sighted in because of it.
    The only way to solve this problem was to have a gunsmith machine the bases off the action,and the drill/tap the receiver for standard scope bases,and that process cost as much as the rifle did brand new in most cases.
     
  14. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    Those mounts were soldered on. They were not integral.

    You may heat them to remove. Machine them to accept a screw, then drill and tap the reciever. That rifle shot 1/2 moa @100 with 150gr federal sp. Just POI changed diagonally at different distances, making it useless for hunting. Not bad for a pencil barrelled 30-06.
     
  15. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    This.

    Its the period before the bankruptcy and the few years after until they got their collective heads out that you need to avoid.

    Since its hard to determine exactly when and if a certain savage is a bad one i recommend only getting known newer ones. There are some good ones that are older out there but there are a lot of bad ones too. Its a crap shoot when it comes to older savage rifles.

    The current production guns are top notch even though ive personally had not such good luck with their cs folks and both savages i bought were not assembled correctly out of the factory, once fixed they are simply fabulous guns.

    My model 10fcpsr came out of the factory with an over torqued barrel nut and a bent firing pin. Savage blamed it on bad ammo...

    There is a post i made regarding this stuff in depth if your interested something along the lines of savage model 10 fcpsr the good bad and ugly.

    I also bought a savage 22 bolt action that had the accutrigger trigger assembly put together incorrectly. It functioned sometimes but would activate the trigger safety on occasion when closing the bolt. Took it apart stripped down the trigger and thought the tension spring for adjusting the accutrigger was gone. It had been stuffed up into the sear area and was binding in there. Fixed thatand it works great.

    While i have personally had issues with their assembly practices i still highly recommend the guns. Im just a magnet for any flawed sample of a product or crappy cs representative.

    Im a fan of savage rifles mainly because of the quality of the product if not the quality of assembly. They are super super super easy to work on with ready availabilty of parts
     
  16. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    Interesting. Never have had a single issue w/ my 110. Did these issues exist on the flat rear receiver rifles??
     
  17. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    it was more a general issue in production quality that degraded over the years which is really what led to their bankruptcy. same thing smith and wesson went through a while back. and same thing ruger went through right before that old ass bill ruger sr passed on. they have since cleaned their issues out and are producing really good quality rifles.

    some good stuff was made some bad its just risky to guess whether the used gun your looking at is a good one or one of the bad ones. savage does NOT support any of their older products and the new ones only have a 1 or 2 year warranty.
     
  18. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    I bought mine new in 1992, could be 2 years off either way. It has a flat top rear receiver. 7MM rem mag Sierra lite. It has 4 additional number sets stamped at the barrel shank, just before the nut. The bolt has a hex bolt rear.

    It is an F series.
     
  19. Apex-Predator

    Apex-Predator New Member

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    I was not a Savage fan back in the 80s and 90s so I cannot comment on their performance/quality, I was on my Remington kick back then, but since the big green sold out to CCM I have owned half a dozen Savage rifles and have been pleased with all of them, not quite on par with my Tikka 6.5x55 or new FN Winchester 70 308 but solid sub-MOA performers at the range and they cost half as much. There is no better value out there today then a Savage 110. My last Savage (30-06) cost me $386 NIB and it came with a nifty little toy scope for my next 22 or BB gun, put a VXII and Reaper one piece rings/mounts on it and my brother actually prefers that to my higher end rifles.