same round in the chamber on daily ccw

Discussion in 'Concealed Carrying & Personal Protection' started by Krisms, Dec 18, 2012.

  1. Krisms

    Krisms New Member

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    i have stumbled into a forum once before where folks mentioned that it's not good to keep re-chamber the same round everyday on ccw. can someone please elaborate why? thanks!
     
  2. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This can cause bullet setback, where the overall length of the loaded round is shorter. This causes higher than normal pressures.
     

  3. 70cuda383

    70cuda383 New Member

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    does this happen from putting the round into the magazine and letting the action chamber the round?

    I have the same round in the chamber every time, but being a beretta, the chamber is easy to access, and I just manually feed the round that's going to be in the chamber, send the slide forward, then insert the mag.

    I find this easier than inserting a full capacity magazine, chambering a round, then removing the magazine and loading another round.
     
  4. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    Yes- If theres no beating banging or such you can "chamber" the same round a thousand times without affecting it-
     
  5. towboater

    towboater Well-Known Member

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    Mine dont last long enough to affect anything. Shoot it once in a while.

    Might not hurt to look the round over good before re-chambering.
     
  6. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    The slide slamming home on a round whether its from a mag or manually inserted causes the case to lose its grip on a bullet. Acts like a kinetic bullet puller.

    I just ride the slide forward on my carry guns when i need to rechamber a round so there is no slamming around.

    Rechambering once or twice isnt going to hurt it but repeatedly doing so can.
     
  7. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    I went to the range Sunday. I had to clear and case my gun to enter the store where the indoor range is located. My top round had been rechambered several times with no real noticeable set back.

    When I inserted that mag and tried to rechamber the same round for one least time, it failed to feed. I looked closely, and the round had basically slipped in the casing. It went from no noticeable set back (I always compare side by side with a fresh round anytime I eject the chambered round), to MAJOR set back. The entire round was almost a 1/4" shorter than a fresh one.

    Bullet set back usually comes on progressively. But I found out two days ago that it can also happen extremely suddenly.

    I'll continue with my method of side by side comparison. I've thrown out several that had set back on me. And when my gun is in my hip, I know that a good round has been chambered already because it's been compared and already chambered before I left the house.

    I believe I've thrown out around 10-15 in the past year due to this phenomenon. Most of the cheap ammo I use seems to be good for 2-4 chamberings.
     
  8. Bear304inc

    Bear304inc New Member

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    I try to rotate my chamber rounds. After a couple of times I'll empty mag and put that one at the bottom before it starts to setback. Also will visually check rounds side by side with a straight edge to see if any descernable difference is seen, , if any difference, toss that round just to be sure.
    Works well for me because if I make it through the whole magazine that just means I'm not shooting enough. So far haven't rotated a whole mag.
     
  9. hardluk1

    hardluk1 Active Member

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    I don't unload at night and only clean after a range trip that is ever two weeks at the most so no worries about bullet set back here.
    But my slide does work fine moveing slowly and controled . No sling shot needed.
     
  10. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    You wont have setback if you controll the slide feeding rounds
     
  11. Fathead00

    Fathead00 New Member

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    Why do you keep re-chambering? I always have a round in the chamber unless I go to the range to shoot.
     
  12. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    For me, I don't have enough money to take regular range trips, and I clean my gun semi regularly, fired or not. I may thoroughly clean 7-10 times between range trips. My last range trip before Sunday was almost two months ago. I clean thoroughly for a couple reasons: 1. Nothing better to do if I can't shoot it, weapons familiarity, a Marine habit. And 2. Never has a weapon been destroyed by cleaning. A bullet every now and then is a small price to pay for knowing your gun intimately.

    I also disassemble at least once a week at a minimum for a wipe down and relube, mostly to check for rust (familiar with Louisiana humidity?). I've had to clean rust off several times already, even though it's always well lubricated.
     
  13. hardluk1

    hardluk1 Active Member

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    JonM What part of my post made you think I was worried about set back. I all ready s l o w l y rack the slide. except at the range. I just done find a need to unload other than when cleaning .
     
  14. BeyondTheBox

    BeyondTheBox New Member

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    Why would you need to Chamber more than once. My guns are always loaded and ready to either go plinking or BG bagging. No need to rechamber. Seems odd to me.
     
  15. Hollander

    Hollander New Member

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    I usually re-chamber a round once. After that I use a magic marker on the base of it and put down in the mag. Once it resurfaces it means the whole mag has been rechambered and that mags gets used on the next range trip. Seems to work for me.
     
  16. Krisms

    Krisms New Member

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    from everybody's responses it doesn't seem like it's a good idea to keep re-chambering. is there at least a safe number of times i can keep doing it to a round or is it pretty much like playing with fire if i do?
     
  17. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Setback tends to happen at it's greatest after the first rechamber. I suggest doing like I and others have done, compare the round side by side with a factory new round.

    One good method is to stand the rechambered round up on it's base, in between two other factory new rounds (one on either side), and lay a ruler or some other straight edge across the top of all three. If the rechambered round touches the straight edge, I would consider it unquestionably safe. If it doesn't touch, use your discretion.
     
  18. Krisms

    Krisms New Member

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    does the setback happen only on the bullet or can it also occur on the primer?
     
  19. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    sorry i musta misread it. i do that from time to time and normally catch it and re-edit
     
  20. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Your primer should never really be affected by anything but a firing pin...
    If your primer is bulged or recessed quite noticeably I think I would first experiment to see if I could reproduce that effect (that's just me, it may not be safe I reckon), or I would call the manufacturer.