Safe to shoot?????

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by quackshack, Jan 16, 2010.

  1. quackshack

    quackshack New Member

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    Hi, I'm new here and just got into reloading and had a question. If there is a stretch mark ahead of the web area, is the round safe to shoot? Here is a pic, its kind of blurry but you can still see the stretch mark.
     

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  2. Silvertip 44

    Silvertip 44 New Member

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    I have been loading my own ammo for quite a long time and I will be the first to cull brass or loaded ammo if something doesn't appear right. There is no reason at all to risk injury or damage with defective looking ammo.
    Looks like that one may be ready to separate so I would definitely send it to the dump.
     

  3. quackshack

    quackshack New Member

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    Thanks. I have been loading about 1.5 grains under the max load, should I decrease it even more?
     
  4. masterPsmith

    masterPsmith New Member

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    Need a more clear photo...............

    Jim.....
     
  5. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    One round?

    Pitch the damn thing!

    Get your puller out, save the bullet and powder and throw the BAD brass away!

    If I'm wrong 99% of the time on this, are you willing to be a 1%er?
     
  6. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    I need a clearer photo to see if it is a stretch mark or if it is just scuffs from the die body rubbing on the body of the case.
     
  7. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    when in doubt toss it out. its only a piece of brass. hell i give away my .458winmag and .458 brass at ranges now and then to kids or adults collecting as a souvenier...
     
  8. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Is that a .223? I have never seen a.223 exhibit a "stretch mark". When a case gets an incipient separation it is rarely visible from the outside. It looks like the sizing die scuffed the brass.

    If that is a "stretch mark" the brass would have been overlength. Did you have to trim the case? If you did not trim at all and it is not overlength, that is NOT a stretch mark.
     
  9. Silvertip 44

    Silvertip 44 New Member

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    You should load between the starting load and max load in your loading manual. If you are using military brass then you should always reduce the maximum load by two grains. Quite often the most accurate load will be somewhat less than maximum.
    The photo is not very clear and if the ring is simply the scuff or burnish of the sizing die then it is pretty much normal. It is kind of diffucult to see the stretched area that will be a case head separation, but sometimes it does show.
    You should also load your brass in separate batches so that you can log the number of times it has been sized and loaded. Almost all my loading is for the M1A and M1 Garand and I limit brass use to 4 total firings.
     
  10. TXnorton

    TXnorton New Member

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    If the case had "stretched" at that point, it would have been over length as Robo has noted, and more than likely would have crumpled in the sizing die. I think Robo has it right in that it looks like a scuffmark from the sizing die.

    What caliber? Are you using Small Base full length re-sizing dies? What kind of case lube are you using? I found that the spray-on case lubes do not work for me when reloading .223/5.56 cases in the SB dies. I have had to go back to using the high-pressure case lube with the pad to keep from sticking cases in the FL SB .223 die.

    Question for others though: If you see signs of incipient or partial case head separation in your fired cases, would that mean you have a head space problem?
     
  11. masterPsmith

    masterPsmith New Member

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    On the headspace issue, the answer could be yes or no. It could be the rifle or the ammo. If you set the shoulder back when re-sizing, it creates excessive headspace (ammo problem). If you are using virgin brass or using factory ammo and getting case head separations, I would surely have the headspace checked. If you just once in a blue moon get a separation with your re-loads, I would say no. That area of the case is the weakest point in the brass and is streached everytime it is fired and worked again everytime it is sized. Even with only .003" headspace, it will weaken the brass at that point in time.

    Jim...................