S&W Model 2

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by Alwayscarrying, Nov 13, 2012.

  1. Alwayscarrying

    Alwayscarrying New Member

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    Any info available on them from you guys? I purchased one thats a little rough and was wondering if it would be worth it to restore this gun.
     
  2. gunsmoke11

    gunsmoke11 New Member

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    A photo would be nice, but leave it alone. Many people buy old guns and want them to look like new, so they refinish them and kill much of it's collector value. If a new looking gun is desired then pay the price for a minty specimen, or buy something new. The word character is used a lot when describing antiques, but that word is most correct. When something is old it will show a certain amount of wear due to use and how well it was cared for. Just enjoy looking at it and wonder who had it and where it's been. That should be all the enjoyment you need. The #2 Smith .32RF was used by many during the civil war and was a well made revolver. Good luck with it.
     

  3. Alwayscarrying

    Alwayscarrying New Member

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    Thanks for the advice smoke, but since you said .32RF I honestly believe I may have the wrong model number. Its a .38 S&W. I'll post pictures in the morning, but if it helps I could describe it.
     
  4. gunsmoke11

    gunsmoke11 New Member

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    Uh oh, OK check again on the model. The S&W model 1 was a .22 and the model 2 was a 32RF made from the beginning of the Civil War till the early 1870's. It's easy to get the model wrong and that's why a photo is sometimes needed. Not a big deal.
     
  5. Alwayscarrying

    Alwayscarrying New Member

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    Thats the problem. As i stated the gun is in rough shape and most of the markings aren't legible. I've determined the caliber and first two digits of what I believe to be a five digit serial number. I took it to a couple people today and was told it was a model 2, first change if that means anything.
     
  6. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    "was wondering if it would be worth it to restore this gun"

    Restore it if you want it for yourself. You would never get your restoration investment back if you sold it.
     
  7. Bob Wright

    Bob Wright Member

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    Old guns are a paradox when it comes to restoration. If the gun is in such shape as to be recognizable and have the "patina" collectors favor, then it is best to leave it alone.

    If the gun is worthless in it present shape, then restoration won't hurt it, you can do whatever you want with it. If maybe so you want a nice looking wall hanger, then have at it.

    Again, as has been said, photos, please.

    Bob Wright
     
  8. Alwayscarrying

    Alwayscarrying New Member

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    Here we go. Some pictures.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    Yours is called ".38 DOUBLE ACTION SECOND MODEL".
    Made in the 1880's
     
  10. Alwayscarrying

    Alwayscarrying New Member

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    Hiwall, thanks for the info. Me and my grandfather narrowed it down to being made between 1880 and 1884. All the book said was second model, so i took that as model 2.
     
  11. gunsmoke11

    gunsmoke11 New Member

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    The nickel finish wear and flaking on these old guns tend to make them look worse than what they actually are. Blue always looks better when worn. From the photos it appears to have 30%+ original finish, which includes the blued trigger guard and rear sight. Usually these guns when refinished have those parts nickeled as well. Also, the barrels are usually shorter than the 6" on yours. Value should be if working properly around $150, or more depending on how bad someone might want it.
     
  12. Alwayscarrying

    Alwayscarrying New Member

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    Gunsmoke, the gun is mostly in working order. The trigger is smooth, the cylinder lock up is tight, however the frame has far too much play to it for me to feel safe attempting to shoot it. I'd really like to get it cleaned up and working, and give it back to its original owner as it was his father's then his brother's. I saw him today and he felt kind of bad about letting it go.
     
  13. gunsmoke11

    gunsmoke11 New Member

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    Giving it back would probably be the right thing to do if he regrets letting it go in the first place. It'll cost a lot more than it's worth fixing it up to your liking and I do mean lots more. It's even hard to find anyone that'll even touch it due to it's age. Some things are just best left alone. Good luck with whatever you decide to do.