S&W Mdl 642

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by danf_fl, Feb 24, 2014.

  1. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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  2. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    the non magnum calibers require at least 3 1/2# of tension at the hammer. The magnums require at least 3 3/4#. This is meassured not in spring tension but actual strength at the hammer. Reducing spring tension is NOT recommended. Nomally the factory springs are very close to the minimum required for reliable functioning.

    The enclosed hammer of the centnennial series makes testing tension very problematic.

    Reducing rebound spring tension is definately NOT recommended. The rebound to hammer lock up is the primary safety in a S&W revolver. With a light spring it is posssible to cycle the action fast enough to disable the functionality of this feature. An old trick was to cut a coil or two off the rebound spring. This made for a nice slick action, but was potentially dangerous.

    My recommendation for the Centennials is to dry fire the crap out of it. Thousands of cycles. Clean and lube afterward. The action will get better and your trigger finger will get stronger.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2014

  3. coonbait

    coonbait Member

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    put a #14 spring(I think factory are #15) in mine years ago and never had any problems, it did lighten up the trigger pull nicely. I can see that going to light will cause problems, it is also true that over time and usage that the pull will get better but you are looking at an ALFULL lot of rounds or dry firing before they get worked in to the point you like. just my own opinion.
     
  4. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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  5. coonbait

    coonbait Member

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    not only will the spring kit help but once you have the gun open, a little work on the rebound slide and a good cleaning and oiling also does wonders. I used the Wilson combat set.
     
  6. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Hmm. Lemme see. Think of the Hell Fire trigger system, Jennings pistols, Remington ammo and several POS automobiles. Less than perfect is the American product mantra lately.

    For range work, target ammo, Federal or Remington primers, it will probably work fine. Defensive use with hard primed Speer ammo? Stay factory.
     
  7. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I have a 642 that I carry almost every day. I do not think of it as a target gun. The trigger weight is the only safety the gun has. I will not alter the only safety that exists on a carry gun. Just my 2 cents.
     
  8. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    An individual purchased one for the wife (I think it is a bad idea as the 642 is more of a "professional" gun than beginner).
    He wants me to lighten the trigger pull (which I am against). It is a brand new pistol and is not broke.

    I believe personally that he should let the wife pick her gun that she can function. But the money has been spent.
     
  9. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Amen! If it is not broke (and it is not broken), don't fix it.;)
     
  10. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I would have to disagree. If this is a great 'carry' gun, especially for a novice, it is as close as ideal as you can get (without ANY modification). Simple, safe, and accurate!:)
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2014
  11. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I agree. It doesn't get any simpler than a double action revolver. I feel the 642 is a top notch defense gun. It is good for the pro or the beginner.