S&W 629 vs S&W 629-1

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by Medic2002, Dec 9, 2010.

  1. Medic2002

    Medic2002 New Member

    3
    0
    0
    I'm looking into getting a 44 mag. I've found a 629 with no dash for $675 and a 629-1 for $500. The person selling the 629 is telling me that it is a better gun than the -1, so I was trying to decide which to buy. Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thx!
     
  2. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

    9,663
    4
    0
    There really isn't much difference unless you are collecting. If you just want a shooter buy the cheaper one.
     

  3. Medic2002

    Medic2002 New Member

    3
    0
    0
    Thx! Will do ;-)
     
  4. Missileman

    Missileman New Member

    491
    0
    0
    The major differences are that to save costs with the 629-1 S&W dropped the pinned barrel and no longer recessed the cylinders, items that were standard on the 629. Many shooters believed this is a weakened design, and it was somewhat proven to be in silhouette competition. I don't believe there were a lot of this model made before S&W made improvements with the 629-2.
    Short answer, yes, I believe the 629 is a better revolver to have than the 629-1 IMHO.
     
  5. Medic2002

    Medic2002 New Member

    3
    0
    0
    So would you spend the extra 175 for it?
     
  6. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

    9,663
    4
    0
    Was the 629 ever pinned a recessed? I thought the 29 had it but the 629 didn't. My 629-1 is pinned but not recessed.
     
  7. Missileman

    Missileman New Member

    491
    0
    0
    According to what I've seen and read from S&W the original 629 was both pinned and recessed, but the 629-1 was neither pinned nor recessed. Maybe you have an interim between the two?

    As far as whether it's worth $175 more I guess that depends on how hard you will use it--probably the normal shooter (not a silhouette competitor) wouldn't see a difference. I've always liked recessed chambers, but that's just a personal prefernce and not grounded in anything otherwise--I do think the pinned barrel is an advantage though...
     
  8. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

    9,663
    4
    0
    I'm going to check into this some more when I get home. I also like the recessed cylinder like on my S&W 19 and Blackhawk but I've never had a single issue with my 629 which is not recessed. I personally can't see spending $175 more for that.
     
  9. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

    9,663
    4
    0
    I was mistaken....my 629-1 is neither pinnned, nor recessed. Sorry!
     
  10. jackg

    jackg New Member

    221
    0
    0
    Does S&W use the old "Bait & Switch" plan? They introduce a Model 29 ( for example) and it's reputation is established over a period of time because it has all the bells and whistles available, cutting edge technology as they say. Then, after a while, they start to cut costs of the very popular model by not recessing the cylinder or pinning the barrel and re-issue the model as a 29-1, then -2 and so on?
    Is that how they work? It seems that way to me because most dash models don't carry the value of the no dash models.
     
  11. zombie

    zombie New Member

    7
    0
    0
    I have an odd 629-1

    Some pics:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    It's a 2.5" magna ported 629-1 that I picked up not too long ago. It's pinned but doesn't have recessed cylinders. It might've been a regular +4" 629-1 that someone had chopped and worked on, even the trigger is amazingly smooth.
     
  12. freefall

    freefall New Member

    2,325
    3
    0
    It's not just S&W, nearly every manufacturer makes a good first model then starts to take shortcuts and cut costs after it becomes popular. At least Smith has the decency to put a -1 etc so you realize somethings changed even if you're not an "expert".
     
  13. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,380
    1
    0
    Well, I detect a significant amount of Smith bashing here. If the 29 is better than the 29-1, is the "pre-29" not then even better. Therefore the numbered models are all junk by comparison?

    "Pinned and recessed" is better than the later versions.
    Barrels were pinned to the frame because tht was the only way they could get them to stay in place and not unscrew. Manufacturing techniques, machines and tools and general engineering know how have evolved and there are now other ways to tackle the problem that happen to cost less and take less time to do. A "crush fit" barrel is not any more likely to fail than a pinned barrel.
    Cylinders were recessed on the original S&W revolvers, so they continued to do it until they figured out is was not necessary any more partially because solid head case design does not need to be recessed. Is it more expensive to recess the cylinder? Of course. Is it "better"? That depends on your definition of better. The recesses will cause chambering problems if the case rim is dinged. The recess is also an area that will gather dirt and powder fouling.

    Other "revisions" over the years include;
    changing the ejector rod threads from right to left handed.
    eliminating the "5th screw" on the side plate.
    eliminating the "4th screw" in front of the trigger guard.
    changing the crane retention screw.
    adding the key lock to the left side of the frame.

    IMHO the above revisions are all "improvements" except for the lock.
     
  14. jackg

    jackg New Member

    221
    0
    0
    If my question has been seen as "bashing" let me say that was not the intent. I was just asking a question, period, and I got the answer.
    I don't see anything wrong with what they do, it's their strategy. Just look at the auto business, cars in the first year of a new model have many issues and as the next model year approaches engineers have fixed many of them for the second year models. Everyone knows that this is their strategy but unlike S&W every iteration gets more expensive because they add more options as standard features, air bags are a good example.
    Anyway, thanks for the answer and it wasn't at all my intent to ruffle any feathers.:D

    BTW: How would you know if you had a pre-29 model, how is it id'ed?
     
  15. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,380
    1
    0
    It was not you doing the bashing. The guns get more expensive because of inflation. The value of the dollar gets lower so the price goes up. If they had not instituted the updates the guns would be astronomical in price. The early Magnums (.357, .44) were essentially handmade works of art, built by very skilled craftsmen. To make one of these today would give a price tag of $5000 or so.

    The "Pre-29's" are basically 29's with no model number under the crane.