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RIP - In Memoriam
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This revolver is designed for use with moon clips. The clips provide not only a means of extracting the rimless .45 ACP cases, but also headspacing. The shoulder in the cylinder is not meant to provide a headspacing means for the auto pistol cartridge. If it does, the ammo is probably made a little long or it has soft primers. The Fiocchi ammo may have hard primers that were not set off from the light hammer strikes.

Shooting this gun w/o the moon clips is a very bad idea. Even if the primer sets off the round, the case will be forced to the rear (recoil shield) with abnormal force. This can be very hazardous to the alloy frame. I would not do it regularly in a steel framed revolver.
 

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RIP - In Memoriam
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Are you saying .45 Auto Rim would severly batter this gun? Seems to be great oversight on the part of Smith & Wesson. One of the advantages of the earliest Smiths over the Colts was the fact the Smith could fire .45 ACP without clips while the contemporary Colts could not. Colt corrected this fault in later guns, the New Service and M1917s.

Bob Wright
The .45 Auto Rim cartridge was designed for these guns not the other way around. The Auto Rim rim is thicker than a "normal' rimmed cartridge to mimic the dimensions of the ACP + moon clip.
 

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RIP - In Memoriam
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Incidentally, the primer is still going to impact the recoil shield, with or without clips, and set-back is required to re-seat the primer.

Bob Wright
True, but there is more impact if the case is allowed to build momentum by travelling farther before impacting the recoil shield. Not a huge deal in a steel frame gun, but the alloy frame revolver in question is not as strong.
 
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