S&W 32 Railroad Gun???

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by trickey, Jul 30, 2008.

  1. trickey

    trickey New Member

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    My dad & I just picked up a .32 S&W revolver, serial # 8527. I can't seem to find anything on the guns age/production #'s. Under a grip is etched "1929 GNRY". The ole fella we got it from (retired railroad) said it belonged to a railroad inspector way back when. The handle is etched with the inspectors initials "J.R. Roundy". The grips are stamped "U.S." and the top of the barrel is stamped "SD GNRY CO".
    Can anyone enlighten me as to what I have here??? Thank you
    Warren
     

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  2. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    US Revolver Company was a bargin line under the umbrella of Iver Johnson. They lacked the transfer bar safety of the IJ's and are unsafe to carry with the hammer down on a loaded chamber. With the proper documentation, the revolver MIGHT have some value to the right collector. Reality is, it is probably worth about $75-100.
     

  3. trickey

    trickey New Member

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    32 Railroad revolver S&W ??

    So...what exactly is it then..it's not a S&W I assume (just caliber), it's a U.S. Revolver?? Can you tell me anything more about it??
     
  4. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Google US revolver company. From what I understand they were the Chevrolet to Iver Johnson's Buick. Bare bones, no transfer bar safety. Common idea for the time to not put your premium logo on a basic product so the base model does not tarnish the reputation of the higher end product. Not many folks remember that GM had their lines graduated from basic to high end Chevy, Pontiac, Buick, Oldsmobile, Cadillac. Each line had more frills than the "lesser" line. Chevy had more hosepower and less amenities (more thrills and less frills) than the others. Now GM lines compete with each other. I thinks the old business model had alot going for it.
     
  5. mrwatch

    mrwatch New Member

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    rail

    Sounds like Great Northern Rail Road.