Ruger MKIII 22/45 first impressions

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by Defiant_one, Jul 21, 2014.

  1. Defiant_one

    Defiant_one New Member

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    I picked up my new toy Saturday Ruger MKIII 22/45 and after taking it home and giving it an initial cleaning, took it to the range Sunday.

    Let me preface this by sayin, I purchased this after shooting my brother-in-laws Ruger MKII several weeks prior and had a blast. Easy to shoot, just plink away and regardless of current .22lr prices, much cheaper than my other calibers.

    Fit, finish and features - The gun is amazingly well made. Fit and finish is very clean, seamless. Everything operates as it should albeit a bit tight as most new guns tend to be. The metal bluing is perfect and mine came with (why I ordered this model) some pretty nice handgrips that are changeable.

    The kit comes with a nice case (plastic form inside, not padded) that includes
    • The gun
    • 2 Ten round magazines
    • An accessory rail kit in case you want to mount a red dot or some such
    • A padlock
    • Instructions
    My one gripe on construction which really came to bear at the range was the magazines. They have a knob on the side that allows you to move the spring down so you can load the cartridges easier. In fact, its seems to be the only way to load as it is really not designed to pop them in 1 at a time by pressing them in like other mags. Perhaps you can but I couldn't.

    The issue is if you pull it down and load the 10 rounds, the spring doesn't seem to want to pop back up. Take them out, move the knob up and down, its fine. Load it up, try the same, it sticks. So I lubed them thoroughly and off to the range.

    The range
    I was so looking forward to a good range shoot. Little did I know it was an effort in angst and frustration. The problem, again being how the magazines fed. If I could get it to pop back up and provide tension, the gun would work fine. Otherwise, I could not chamber a round. Drop the mag, play with it a bit, etc. The resolution would not come until later when I decided to dismantle and glean the entire gun. Suffice it to say, at the range, I am lucky if I sent 40 rounds down range. Felt good but was set to do about 150.

    Striping, Cleaning and magazine issue resolution
    The Ruger 22's have a reputation as being a pain to dismantle and re-assemble. Just check out the net and Youtube videos. It lived up to its reputation but only if you don't follow directions. The process is rather draconian but I give Ruger credit for providing step by agonizing step in the manual - and it really works.

    You will be frustrated the first time and after that, you will always know how to take it apart. Follow the GUIDE, not the Youtube videos. Models vary too much.

    Cleaning was very easy and I cleaned and lubed with my favorite, FrogLube. I also Froglubed the hell out of the magazines hoping that was the issue. Inside and out.

    Loaded the mags, released the spring knob, stuck. Ugg. remove the rounds, did it again, same issues, over and over. Until I read the manual and discovered something. It said make sure the rounds are aligned. "Hmm...why wouldn't they be".

    To make a long story short, when loading the rounds, you should hold the magazine top back pointed at 2 o'clock. Why? Because now all the rounds are resting against the back portion and releasing the spring knob allows them all to flow UP evenly. It appears that before, the fronts where causing the rounds to be misaligned and jamming. Not really a smart design and a really big pet peeve.

    They designed a beautiful gun and the mags are metal - not plastic -but how do you miss the boat on loading and applying tension ?

    In summary
    Definitely worth getting one and having some fun. It is dead on accurate, no recoil to speak of and just nice to have in the gun back. It is also a good, cost effective 1911 .45 trainer as that is what it is designed for.

    It gets a 8.5 out of 10 from me losing a lot of ground due to the mags.

    Stock picture (haven't photo'd mine yet)

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    kNOB IS ON OTHER SIDE
    [​IMG]

    note the magazines

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    very well written review.

    i bought one just like it a couple of years ago and absolutely love mine. very well made and much more accurate than i'm capable of. very fun pistol to shoot. i have now exceeded several thousands of trouble-free rounds through mine.

    my only regret was not having bought one of these Ruger pistols many years ago and all the fun i missed out on.
     

  3. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    Get yourself a magazine ‘loader’ or use a bottle cap or something to save your thumb. I still need to whack the barrel to get it off and on. I have the Speed Strip installed and it makes basic cleaning SO much easier. It IS dead on accurate.
     
  4. endobro

    endobro New Member

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    I shot my dads MK II a few months ago and completely agree that it is a ton of fun. And my only issue was loading the mags
     
  5. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

    Nice review. A couple of comments. This model takes me 10 seconds to take apart and 30 seconds to reassemble. I own two currently. This is no bravado. My very first Ruger 22 I took to a dealer and sold disassembled. I could not take it anymore. Then got better.

    The magazine was designed back in the 40's. The metal follower button rubs against a metal cutout with sharp edges. A modern polymer would do much nicer, but it is what it is.

    Greasing the mag will help only briefly. Those mags have to be absolutely straight and even. One little burr or bend, and here we go, it's a PITA. They also like to rust. So grease them for storage, not for shooting. For shooting, instead, give your box of 22 LR a puff of remoil. Just one. They will feed easier.
     
  6. LikeABoss

    LikeABoss Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Love my plinker....
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    As Mercator mentioned above, one thing you can do to improve the magazines is to disassemble them and de-burr the slot in the side of the mag bodies that the "button" rides up and down in. Out of the box they usually have some burrs, and the extremely sharp edges catch on the button and stop the movement of the magazine follower. You may need to smooth up the groove in the button as well.

    Then do yourself a huge favor and buy yourself an "Ultimate Clip Loader". http://www.amazon.com/McFadden-Machine-Ultimate-Clip-Loader/dp/B004YF931Y

    When properly lubed and adjusted it takes me all of 2 SECONDS to fully load a 10 round magazine. And that's not an exaggeration. [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wFM9YFbKak[/ame]

    I prefer to spend more time pulling the trigger than loading magazines. :)

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2014
  8. hmh

    hmh New Member

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    Get a tandom cross magazine disconnect. After you take it apart a few times the takedown becomes a lot easier.
     
  9. DrFootball

    DrFootball disappointed & disgusted, But DETERMINED... Lifetime Supporter

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    Just about every 22 Semi Auto pistol mags have feeding issues, our Buckmark's mags do the same thing,..and they. "warp " easy


    Sent from my iPhone using CC Firearms Talk
     
  10. Defiant_one

    Defiant_one New Member

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    Thanks

    So glad to hear the mags are not ME...lol..Like I was missing some trick...I do notice that as I said, if I tip it back, the rounds align better...

    IT IS a fun gun though...and I think it would make a great teaching gun when introducing someone to shooting the first time. Easy on them rather than "Here's my .45..." :D
     
  11. Defiant_one

    Defiant_one New Member

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    Very good !!!

    I'll start with the disassembly of the mags !!

    On another note, agree the first time taking the gun down is hard...the steps draconian...I feel like I should light a candle as part of the steps...

    But after going through it..everything in the gun (and in my head) clicked and its not that bad...
     
  12. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    Something else that hmh mentioned above, is modifying the gun to eliminate the magazine disconnect safety. It's a personal decision as to do this to your gun or not. Some people are not comfortable with eliminating that function, and that is fine.

    What it does is that it removes the need to have to pull your empty magazines from the gun. It allows the empty mags to drop freely from the gun when you push on the magazine release button. But it also removes the magazine disconnect function from the pistol, meaning that the gun will still fire a cartridge in the chamber even though the magazine is removed from the gun. Also too, it eliminates the dance of having to insert the magazine / pull the trigger / remove the magazine, etc., etc., when disassembling/reassembling the gun. :)

    Many semi-auto pistols do not have this feature at all (1911's for example) and it is an unnecessary burden in most people's opinion. Follow the standard rules of gun safety and it's never a problem.

    Anyone with a reasonable amount of mechanical aptitude can swap out the parts needed on their own. But again, it's just an option available to owners of these pistols.

    Glad to hear you are putting your Ruger to good use! :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2014
  13. Defiant_one

    Defiant_one New Member

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    Thanks for that

    I would gladly do that (I hate mag safeties) ..My only concern is what it does to the steps for dismantling the gun...Put the mag in, click the trigger, take the mag out, do the sign of the cross, put the mag back in, hop on one foot while holding the bolt stop pin....LOL
     
  14. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

    At a certain point of reassembly you will no longer have to insert the mag to disable the disconnect.

    I am neutral toward the mag disconnect safety. I think it is reasonable, considering that the small 22 cartridge can be left in the chamber unnoticed. The Ruger is not a combat pistol. Only IMO.
     
  15. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

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    I've never thought loading the magazines was a particularly hard task. That said, they do end to ease up a bit with use. The deburring idea sounds like something I want to try, some of those edges are sharp.
    Take down/assembly was a bit a PITA initially. I sat down and did it a bunch of times in one sitting until I had it down. I'm sometimes wonder if some people's problem with the process is that they don't do it often enough to get it committed to memory. Do it 8 or 10 times in a sitting, I bet retention improves.
    Am I the only one who's MK3 came with enough preservative goop for a crate of AK-47s? I ended up detail stipping mine and tossing everything in the parts washer to get it all out. Since it was apart, a quick polish and deburr of all the internals made a HUGE difference in the trigger. Particularly in the reset, which occasionally got squirrely.
     
  16. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    LOL! I forgot to include that in my post originally, and was probably typing it out as you were posting..... :eek:
     
  17. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    Absolutely nothing wrong with that opinion. You are not alone. As far as having an unnoticed round in the chamber, the guns are equipped from the factory with a loaded chamber indicator on the left side of the receiver.

    .... Although I have eliminated that on my own gun as well as the mag disconnect for a couple of reasons. Again it comes down to personal choice.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2014
  18. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    I pretty much do that with every gun I buy, but IIRC I found mostly powder residue throughout my MKIII from the factory test firing. Either that or the boys at the gun shop had themselves a good time before I picked it up. :rolleyes:

    I agree about deburring the internals too. I installed a custom trigger and sear and spent quite a bit of time working on giving the transfer bar a clean smooth path to work with a very short reset. It paid off in spades.
     
  19. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

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    The deburring and straightening the transfer bar were such an improvement, I didn't feel the need to buy upgrade parts for the trigger. The transfer bar on mine wasn't straight when I got it, which was most of the reason I occasionally had reset issues. Well that and the big ol' burr from the stamping process. It's amazing what a simple polishing will do.
    I've been meaning to do the washer mod to delete the magazine disconnect. One of these days I'll get around to it. As it sits, its pretty good.
     
  20. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    Same here.... in a way. It was "roomy" enough with the factory tolerances that it functioned just fine most of the time. It was only after I installed the upgraded parts with tighter tolerences that I discovered I needed to tweak the transfer bar just a bit to straighten it and keep it in alignment.

    They are still a great value and good guns right out of the box though IMHO.