Ruger Gunsite Scout Rifle

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by TrueNorth, Jul 28, 2011.

  1. TrueNorth

    TrueNorth New Member

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    I have just seen the Ruger Gunsite Scout Rifle, it's an interesting concept, but I can't say that I fully understand the advantage of it.

    It is shorter than other rifles in .308. It's box mag fed, and bolt action. It's also more expensive than other hunting rifles. So why get a scout rifle? It's slightly lighter than other rifles, but the short barrel makes me think that it won't use the .308 round effectively, and the kick will be harder on it. And why have the box fed bolt gun?

    Overall, since it costs a premium, why would I want this over a "normal" bolt gun. I could understand if it was semi-auto maybe.

    It is marketed as a gun that does everything, but what is that? Hunting, SD, ruggedness, does it offer HBO? I just don't see what it does. Unless its for people who do not intend to use the gun, but want a lightweight / powerful gun with 10 rds around as an emergency thing.

    Anyone have any experience, or would recommend it?
     
  2. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    my opinion:

    its a stupid concept. its a type of gun that doesnt do anything well but succeed at failure. better off with a quality semi-auto for defense or survival. in a life or death situation a lightweight semi-auto in 556 or 762x39 will take any game in north america to keep you alive. it might not be a clean kill but it will keep you fed.

    for a bolt gun iron sighted mosin 91/30 is hard to beat. there are short carbine versions if thats your thing.

    personaly i dont understand the need for a "scout" rifle
     

  3. TCH2FLY

    TCH2FLY New Member

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    The term "scout rifle" was coined by Col. Jeff Cooper when he described his ideal general purpose rifle. It was intended to be compact light weight and able to takeout a human target at a distance that would only be limited by the shooters ability to hit the target.

    It was designed by a pretty sharp dude when it comes to weapons ... a "stupid" idea?? I guess opinions will vary;)
     
  4. KahrCarryingInfidel

    KahrCarryingInfidel New Member

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    I don't have a problem with it. In fact, I kinda dig it. At under $1,000, it's a steal. It's on my short list.

    And they look to be pretty popular too. Bud's is out of them at $749 a pop.:D
     
  5. Jake15

    Jake15 New Member

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    Personally, I think its a great idea. Its marketed as "the one rifle to have if you could only have one" so it was designed to be a shtf/hunting/sd/plinking fun as hell rifle that anyone can pick up and use quickly and easily. Its got a strong, simple, reliable action and its stupid accurate even with iron sights. Its in .308 so its got the stones to drop any animal you'll come across, and as for the rate of fire, first of all, no wasted shots, second, I've seen plenty of guys who can throw a bolt and fire in alot less than a second. It was made with the input of the top Gunsite instructors, and if anyone knows what would be best, it's them. Again, I think it a great idea and I REALLY, really want one, two would be better!
     
  6. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    cooper was the master of great one liners and zingers but he was hardly a good gun designer. i remember the bren ten fiasco of the mid 80's heh. ruger makes decent rifles but the features just dont meld.
     
  7. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    I saw one on one of the outdoor channel shows last week. And not knowing what it was, I must admit I though what is that atrocity. A bolt action rifle with a box magazine which certainly can not be as accurate as the typical bolt action. We experienced this fact in LE Sniper Schools when Remington came out with the 700s with the box magazines. Accuracy definitely was not what it had been. I guess the point being the Ruger Scout Rifle is not intended to be a precision rifle. I just think it was a stupid idea in more ways than one. That's all I would want is a 30 Round 308 Box Magazine hanging out of the bottom of the bolt gun. At least with the M-14 rifles you did not have to take your hands out of position to operate a bolt. I guess if your in to gimmicks it's OK. Of course at a show I saw 511 selling 511 Tactical Boot Laces if you get the drift.:)


    03
     
  8. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    IMO, they think you haven't seen a Mosin M-44 yet. I'd try a lot of stuff before you buy. To what type of "guide" are they referring?
    Most decent guides I've heard of wouldn't want a box mag getting in the way.

    Generally, if the "guide" does his job right, and his customers can shoot
    passably, the guide, under optimum conditions, never even fires his gun,
    barring extreme situations, or for fun. That's why they're looking for
    a small, light, all-purpose rifle.
     
  9. AusLach

    AusLach New Member

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    Huh? :confused:

    A DBM bolt action rifle will be just as accurate as any internal mag rifle. An edge would go to a single shot bolt action for sure, as they have more metal to counteract the torsional stresses that firing places upon the action, however a DBM and internal mag rifle have the same action cutout.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2011
  10. Jake15

    Jake15 New Member

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    I don't see what everybody's deal is, its just a short barreled bolt gun with a detachable box mag, yall are all acting like its the work of satan himself. Maybe its a stereotype that bolt guns are only for long range shots and therefore useless for closer range? Or is it that a bolt gun shouldn't have a box mag? I think everyone should just lighten up and have an open mind towards this
     
  11. TrueNorth

    TrueNorth New Member

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    Hah! Good to see the blood flowing in the crowds today! Thanks to all posters.

    So, I'm getting the feeling that its not an ideal hunting weapon, probably inferior to other bolt guns, and not as accurate at long range, but easier to carry since it's lighter and possibly allowing for moderate rate of fire.

    Overall a great gun if its not intended to be used. As in the guide example, where if they do their job right they shouldn't have to shoot, but good to have around if you have nothing else.

    I'm thinking that I want to try it, but I'd get a less gimmicky gun before I pick this up.

    Is there anything that this does better than other guns? Or is there a reason to have it over other guns?
     
  12. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    I see it as a compromise, which panders to the "box mag" crowd.

    If you want interchangeable mags, they generally lend themselves

    to semi-autos. IMO, a box mag on a bolt-action is as useless as

    hen-crap on a pump-handle, due to the fact that your rate of fire is

    so slowed down by the inherent design, (of any bolt action) that

    the difference in reload time would be minimally helpful in the field.

    IMO, something like an SKS, semi with a built-in mag, is preferable.

    If I were out in the weeds as a guide or scout, I wouldn't want a box-mag

    tangling on every vine or branch within 20 feet.

    Bear in mind, that generally, it's not the job of a scout to fight, and

    IF he does his job properly, he never fires a shot, generally, either.

    Ruger makes a great rifle, generally, though. I can't say there isn't

    someone out there, somewhere, who might find it useful for

    something, somehow.
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2011
  13. Jake15

    Jake15 New Member

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    I think what everybody's getting hung up on is the concept of a "scout rifle",that's just what they named it, but it's not much different than a normal bolt gun, it's just shorter with a box mag, and it has good reasons for both, shorter to make it easier to handle but still really accurate, and the box mag isn't for quick reloads, its so you can carry one or two mags and not have to carry any loose rounds, not to mention that it helps a lot when loading and unloading, and as for the mag getting hung up on everything, have you ever heard stories of a GI shooting a vietnamese or vise versa because his mag got hung up on something? Me neither, and I ain't planning on hiking through vietnam anytime soon! Remember its not for large volumes of suppresive fire, its for single well placed shots at a distance, which it does well. And I don't think there's any "gimmick" to it, its a well designed rifle that does its job very well, and I think there should be a lot more guns like it, so please, don't knock it till ya tried it. That is all
     
  14. TCH2FLY

    TCH2FLY New Member

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    ^ x2
    I'm not sure why everybody wants to take the name so literally.

    I respect that other people have various opinions on the rifle but weapons are hardly a "one size fits all" situation, why get so worked up? Why blast the concept just because it doesn't fit your own style/need?
    That is a bit like somebody saying a *insert name* sports car is crap simply because they can't fit their 5 kids and a dog inside or a mini van sucks because it can't do 185 mph :rolleyes:
    buy what works for you ... if you need a short, lightweight, bolt action in .308, this might be a really good choice.

    I'm not sure about this "box mag crowd" to which you refer ... perhaps guys like me who shoot competitively with a bolt action and find most internal mags will not hold enough rounds to complete a particular stage without a reload and/or prefer to have multiple loaded mags?? Perhaps your "opinion" is based on a perception with no real experience.
     
  15. dan983

    dan983 New Member

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    Answer to a nonexistent problem

    Scout rifle was a 30-30 Winchester or Marlin for the past 100+ years. I'm older so I placed a new Redfield 2 x 7 scope on my Marlin. Need past 200 yards? Then carry a 270 Winchester.
     
  16. TrueNorth

    TrueNorth New Member

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    Alright, well once again thanks for the opinions.

    It seems like it may not have a specific purpose for the average joe, but it may just be another option for somebody to try for their personal preference.

    I was wondering if there was something particularly special or different that made it an attractive choice, but as far as guns go this seems to be "just another option". It seems to not really solve any problem but just gives shooters another option for a high calibre lightweight gun.

    I guess I'll just have to try one and decide for myself!
     
  17. Myke2209

    Myke2209 New Member

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    I'm with you buddy I'm not a very big guy and I have been looking at the gunsite and the one thing I love about it is the size and that it has a threaded barrel
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2012
  18. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Coopers original concept was a rifle that featured the following characteristics:

    -An unloaded weight, with accessories, of 3 kg (6.6 lbs); with 3.5 kilograms (7.7 lbs) the maximum acceptable.
    -An overall length of 1 meter (39.4 in.) or less. These two characteristics place scout rifles into the general class of carbines.
    -A forward-mounted telescopic sight of low magnification, typically 2-3" main lens diameter. This preserves the shooter's peripheral vision, keeps the ejection port open to allow the use of stripper clips to reload the rifle, and eliminates any chance of the scope striking one's brow during recoil. Cooper has stated that a telescopic sight is not mandatory.
    -Ghost ring auxiliary iron sights: a rear sight consisting of a receiver-mounted large-aperture thin ring, and typically a square post front sight. This allows the rifle to be accurately aimed at short to medium ranges even if the scope becomes damaged.
    -A "Ching" or "CW" sling. Against common practice, Cooper advocated the use of a sling as a shooting aid. The Ching sling offers the convenience of a carrying strap and the steadiness of a target shooter's sling with the speed of a biathlete's sling. (The CW sling is a simpler version of a Ching sling, consisting of a single strap.)
    -A standard chambering of .308 Winchester/7.62x51mm NATO or 7mm-08 Remington for locales that forbid civilian ownership of cartridges in chamberings adopted by military forces or for its "slightly better ballistics."[2] As Cooper wrote, "A true Scout comes in .308 or 7mm-08."[3] The .243 Winchester is an alternative for young, small-framed, or recoil-shy people, but needs a 22" barrel. Cooper also commissioned "Lion Scout," chambered for the .350 Remington Magnum cartridge.
    -Accuracy: Should be capable of shooting into 2 minutes of angle or less (4") at 200 yards/meters (3 shot groups).

    The idea was to have a rifle handy enough that you could have it anywhere you may trek, with enough accuracy and power to handle most things you might encounter. It should have an ability to carry extra ammo and be fast to reload.

    Also remember at the time he was really pushing the concept, a lot of semi-wuto weapons were banned or restricted, so he chose a design that is fairly politically correct, and less likely to be targeted by legislative restrictions.

    When you do put all of the features on a single rifle, it is quite handy, and if you were a person who didn't want a collection of guns but one good multi-tasker then the concept is sound. I've got a few friends with them, and they are a very accurate and easy to shoot rifle. 3-5" groups at 300yds off a bench is nothing to sneeze at. The long eye releif scope is a fast sighting system. A box mag does make for a faster reload, and unload for storage or getting in and out of a vehicle when hunting.

    I think they are pretty cool.

    Lots of folks make other rifles into scout formats. If you want to play with the concept on the cheap, buy a surplus rifle that feeds from stripper clips, a scout mount and a long eye relief scope and see how you like it.

    The Ruger has a nice trigger and mounting points to mount a long eye relief scope or a standard scope.
     
  19. HockaLouis

    HockaLouis New Member

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    FINALLY, thank you SSGN. Christ. The gun is great as far as it was designed to be with the features and benefits that it is supposed to have. Damn. And it's not the only one... BTW, I believe Ruger went with a single stack mag as much to have the profile of the gun they got vs. reliability -- sorry, it's sexier and that sells.
     

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    Last edited: Jun 9, 2012
  20. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A Mini 30 scout. The local FNRA is raffling off a Ruger Scout. $10 a ticket. I did not know if I would like the concept but it seems to be working. It is interesting but takes some getting used to. I can now field strip the rifle without removing the scope.
     

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    Last edited: Jun 9, 2012