Ruger 10/22 Owners/Shooters

Discussion in 'Wisconsin Gun Forum' started by SGWGunsmith, Mar 20, 2017.

  1. SGWGunsmith

    SGWGunsmith Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've been a huge fan of .22 rimfire guns since I was a kid. Over the years, at least since 1964 when they first appeared, I've been working with and on Ruger 10/22 rifles. Why Ruger decided to make those dang stocks so short that only kids and short stature women can shoot 'em.
    These days, there are so many aftermarket barrels, stocks and pretty much every internal component available that it'll make your head spin. For those who like to "tinker" with these rifles, it makes things that much more fun.

    One of the components involved with the Ruger 10/22 that I like to tune up and make a bit better is the bolt.

    [​IMG]

    Bringing headspace into a better condition that eliminates "light rim hits" from the factory 0.0550 inch dimension down to 0.0430-0.0420 dimension, gives the bolt a little bit more closeness to the breach face for more positive ignition. Pinning the firing pin to keep it down and going straight forward will keep the front end from rearing up and presenting flyers on target. A better extractor for much more positive extraction will have spent brass flying out of the chamber and landing 12 to 15 feet to the right. Fun stuff to make a GOOD rifle, even BETTER.
     
  2. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Well-Known Member

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    There's also a couple little tricks I do to enhance accuracy & reliability in addition. Radiusing or rounding the bottom rear of the bolt will allow it to cycle smoother with less force. That's important when using match ammo which is subsonic, and may be on the edge of cycling pressure. I prefer to make my own firing pin with a slightly wider or fatter face for more positive ignition from tool steel, hardened of course after final fitting/dimensions. Facing the bolt face to .043 rim thickness, and there's even several things you can do with a factory barrel to make it much more accurate, and a dandy "sleeper"! You get a bit more involved when setting the barrel back however.
     

  3. SGWGunsmith

    SGWGunsmith Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I pretty much agree with all you've written. Although I left it out of the mix, I also radius the bottom rear of the factory bolt. When maintaining the use of the Ruger factory receiver, it also helps to smooth the inside top face of the receiver, which is often found to be a bit rough. That is normally done in my shop using #220 grit emery paper to smooth out the roughness from the investment casting process and then I go to #320 grit and the #400 grit for a smooth finish. And again, I agree, it makes for a smooth sliding bolt. Most of this stuff can be done by the DIY owner.
    Making your own firing pin is a skill many owners do not have and then, heat-treatment of a part, as thin as the Ruger firing pin is, also requires much care so that the shape doesn't warp out of flat during quenching. Then the metal needs to be "drawn" back to a workable hardness, properly, so as not to be too brittle.

    There is a lot of stuff an individual owner can do to make his Ruger 10/22 a much better performing firearm, if they want to.
     
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  4. SGWGunsmith

    SGWGunsmith Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have this 10/22 set-up to specifically shoot CCI Quiet ammunition ( 710 FPS ). Factory barrel has been replaced with a Feddersen threaded barrel for suppressor use. Scary quiet.

    The trick here lies with the Volquartsen "Firefly" aircraft aluminum bolt. The CCI Quiet ammunition functions just fine, and the only sound heard is the bolt going backward and then coming forward. No ear protection needed.

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Well-Known Member

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    It's always good to know when others think along the same basic lines! If you have a polymer bolt stop pin in receiver, replacing the factory part, it stops that little smack when the bolt collides with it. I'm sure you already knew that, but it helps to let others benefit if they didn't.
     
  6. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That metal bolt stop pin caused elongated holes in the receiver on my 1st 10-22 from 1964. Tried several fixes before the plastic pins became available. Electrical wire insulation over the pin was one fix.
     
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