Rifling machine

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing Forum' started by JayCody, Sep 23, 2013.

  1. JayCody

    JayCody New Member

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    I was looking into how rifle barrels were rifled and was wondering if y'all know where I could find plans for a rifling machine. if they did it way back in 1800 it can't be that hard right?
     
  2. Cheever

    Cheever New Member

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  3. JayCody

    JayCody New Member

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    I have seen some wooden ones and that's what I'm aiming to build, it's just a project and I'm not looking to mass produce barrels. something about being able to say that I built it.
     
  4. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    http://www.firearmsid.com/A_bulletIDrifling.htm

    quick explanation of different methods.

    you win the lottery?? the older ways to do it are just as expensive in relation to the cost of setup today as it was way back when.

    the price of machine tools has not changed and frankly i doubt it ever will. the only thing thats changed is the massive inflation.

    back in the 1800's you needed the equivelant of a couple million in today's money to setup a rifling operation. you will need that same equivelant in money to etup whether your doing it the way it was done in the 1800's or the way its done today.
     
  5. JayCody

    JayCody New Member

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    Maybe but there is more then one one to build an ak. The old machines look very simple but there aren't plans anywhere so building one would be difficult.
     
  6. JayCody

    JayCody New Member

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    [ame]http://youtu.be/ou8nNBn5Cbs[/ame]

    This machine can't cost that much to build, even if it was cheap. seems like too much work for a primitive barrel.
     
  7. Cheever

    Cheever New Member

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  8. JayCody

    JayCody New Member

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    Perhaps but the force needed to push the button through the rifle is from what I have read 10000lbs. broach rifling seems more within reach.
     
  9. Cheever

    Cheever New Member

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    I would think you could pull the broach through with some sort of hydraulic press
     
  10. JayCody

    JayCody New Member

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    Maybe a 20 ton press. Main issue here is where i would get a broach.
     
  11. JayCody

    JayCody New Member

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    I'm thinking it could be done On a lathe using a large thread cutter.
     
  12. JayCody

    JayCody New Member

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    Ok I found blueprints for a manual rifling machine. I might actually build it as a weekend project
     
  13. BillM

    BillM Active Member Supporter

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    Find a copy of a book titled Foxfire 5. Has a pretty good section on old time gun building, including
    a rifling machine and how to use it.
     
  14. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    FWIW, back in the day when a maker of rifles would be rifling his own barrels-

    Start with a slender, straight wooden rod longer than the barrel. Wrap a cord or string around the rod. If you want one turn in 48", then the cord wil make one 360 turn in 48 " of length. Mark the path of the cord with a pencil, then use a chisel to remove wood along that spiral, keeping depth uniform.

    When finished, and you place the rod thru a collar, with a fixed tooth from the collar to the groove, when you pull the rod in or out, it will rotate- once every 48". On the end of the rod that will go into the barrel, (or a thinner steel extension that will fit into the barrell) attach a hardened steel cutting tooth. Tooth is attached with a hinge on the side of the rod.

    Slip paper between the hinge and the rod until tooth contacts the barrel. Lube the tooth with lard. Run in an out about 20 times, leaving a spiral scratch on the inside of the barrel. Add another strip if paper, which will push the cutter out further. Another 20 stokes, in and out. Repeat until that single tooth has cut the groove as deep as you want.

    Remove rod, remove paper, clean tooth, rotate barrel, begin cutting the SECOND groove. Which explains why rifling was so shallow, and two groove rifling was popular (instead of 6 grooves).

    Gun makers had a device to run that rod in and out of the barrel with very little effort on their part. It was called an apprentice. A bit of regular paper is ABOUT .004 inches thick. 20 stokes to cut that deep, multiplied by the number of cuts you need to reach desired depth. NOT a fast process.
     
  15. Josh1158

    Josh1158 New Member

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    I was thinking of doin this for alittle cannon but never got around to it. Something like a 3 or 4 lead acme thread cut with a grv tool. The only problem I could see would be chatter and taper if you went much over 2 or 3 inches.
     
  16. outlaw206

    outlaw206 New Member

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    Sweet info I never knew thats how it use to be done kinda kool but sounds like a MF to do
     
  17. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Not unless you are the apprentice. :D


    gunsmith3.jpg
     
  18. outlaw206

    outlaw206 New Member

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  19. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    The soft iron barrels were forged from laps. The laps or strips of iron were wrapped around a mandrel. The mandrel created the raw bore. By 1820 Hammer Forging plants were making barrels. Gun builders started buying completed barrels rather then make them. Remington started as barrel maker. :)
     
  20. outlaw206

    outlaw206 New Member

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    Sweet deal