Rifles for dummies

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by alonso562, Sep 11, 2012.

  1. alonso562

    alonso562 New Member

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    What are some good rifles I can use to practice in California? My wallet is hurting so I need something inexpensive. Oh and I've never shot a rifle in my life
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2012

  2. elfmdl

    elfmdl New Member

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    Definitely get a .22 and I strongly recommend a Ruger 10/22. You can't beat there accuracy. Unfortunately I guess you won't get to use any banana clip since you live in California.
     
  3. hareebrownbeest

    hareebrownbeest New Member

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    I just got one yesterday. Came with a bushnell scope 3x9x40. I got mine in 30.06 caliber and it was on sale for $299. Now it's $459:(
     
  4. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    A good used .22 bolt action rifle. Ammo is cheap, the guns are usually fairly inexpensive and you can practice, practice and do more practice until you really get the fundamentals down.

    See if there are any Appleseed shoots in your area any time soon and get to one. They will provide excellent coaching to get you where you want to be as a rifleman, before you go dropping a lot of money on a heavier caliber rifle using more expensive ammo.

    Besides everyone needs a good .22.

    Here's a link to the Appleseed project web site:

    http://appleseedinfo.org/
     
  5. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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  6. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    First, welcome to the forum. When you get a minute, stop by the intro thread, say hello, and tell us a bit about yourself.

    For a first rifle, would suggest a .22. They are inexpensive, as is the ammo. Fairly easy to find a place to shoot a .22, recoil is about zero. You can go for the basics (a bolt action Marlin) or for a fancier auto loading rifle (Ruger 10-22 is very popular) You can use iron sights, or a modestly priced scope.

    Now, a .22 DOES have it's limits. It's accurate range for targets is about 50 yards- some can stretch that to 100 or so. It has limited power- so you are not going to be hunting elephants, rhinos, or deer with it. But they are accurate, a good learning tool, and ammo is cheap enough that you will go shoot it without weeping when you pull the trigger.

    And another nod to an Appleseed shoot. Check the net for contacts with your STATE rifle association for locations, and where you can get some instruction.
     
  7. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    a bolt action .22lr as mentioned above.

    I have NEVER met a shooter, that started with a single shot .22lr, who couldn't flat out shoot. Usually because they get one shot and then had to pass it to their brother/sister or friend for their shot, so you learn to make the shots count.
     
  8. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    As has been said, start with a bolt action or single shot .22 rifle. Start with iron sights and learn to shoot accurately. Don't move on to a scope until you have mastered the iron sights.

    Start with a firearms safety class. Then you can try Appleseed or a couple of lessons from an NRA certified instructor.

    I've been shooting for years and I plan on going to an Appleseed shoot at some time to improve my skills. You're never too old or too good not to learn more. In fact, Appleseed is worth attending just for the history lesson.

    Best of luck to you.
     
  9. bigjim

    bigjim New Member

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    Why do people keep saying this? You can eat with your fingers or you could eat with a fork. Me I'm a fork guy, most of my rifles don't even have iron sights on them. Why in the world would I want to use iron sigths, I wouldn't. Use whatever will make you happy and don't listen to old wives tales.

    Good luck.
    Jim
     
  10. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Spend a couple hours driving to a hunting spot. Hike in a half an hour or so. Drop your rifle and bust your scope. Are you SOL for your hunt today or can you shoot well enough with the iron sights that are on the rifle as a back up. Or spend big money on an out of state hunt or an international hunt and have your scope damaged.

    Iron sights and the ability to use them is a kind if insurance.

    Scopes are great tools. Shooting well without one will usually help you make the most of shooting with one.
     
  11. NM-LEO

    NM-LEO New Member

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    Marlin Model 60!

    FUN FUN FUN TO SHOOT AND CHEEEEEEEAAAAAP ;)
     
  12. Jasson

    Jasson New Member

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    I have recently started in the hunting/rifle game. I was given a 303 Parker Hale by my uncle. I love it but soon after bought a Brno CZ model 2 .22lr to learn and improve on the fundamentals. I have had so much fun that i cant wait for the weekends to shoot some more (weather permitting) there is next to no recoil, highly accurate and not so noisy. It has helped me greatly in my hunting. Not only in accuracy but to make each shot count. .22 is the best calibre EVER! ; )
     
  13. Yunus

    Yunus New Member

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    I know people who don't know how to drive a manual transmission car because they learned on automatics. i prefer knowing how to use both and in the case of shooting, iron sights are less accurate so you need to focus on the other aspects of shooting to be accurate like breathing and heartbeat and smooth trigger pull.
     
  14. Old_Crow

    Old_Crow New Member

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    For practical purposes you might never need to use a scope. My wife has no intention of hunting but she enjoys shooting. She has no problems hitting a spent shotgun shell at 20 yards with a Model 60 equipped with open sights. For her uses I don't see how a scope can be anything but an PITA. I can't recommend that anyone should become totally dependent on optics to hit anything.
     
  15. bigjim

    bigjim New Member

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    This is a personal opinion. But shooting with a scope will help someone shoot without one. In over 50 years of shooting, I have found that seeing your target without the front post covering it up is essential to hitting the target in the correct place. (or do you use a 6 o'clock hold?)

    The OP has never fired a rifle before and unless someone is willing to sit down with him and teach him how to drift his front sight and walk in the elevation on his rear sight a scope will have him learning trigger control and proper breathing much faster and make shooting much more fun for him. A scope requires the rifle to be locked down, take one shot and then adjust your cross hairs to the bullet hole and you are ready to go.

    This is not a hunting post, but if it was I would tell you:

    A) After any amount of travel, check your scopes zero in camp, BEFORE going in the field.
    B) Always take 2 rifles with incase one fails (jams) or is dropped down a hill or into a stream.
    C) Don't, let me repeat this, DON'T drop your rifle or put it on a slop where it will roll down hill.
    D) When all else fails, take a second scope (or optic) with just incase or get a compond bow. (it might be safer for you, LOL)

    Jim
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2012
  16. superc

    superc Member

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    Start with a Chipmunk or something similar, but equally simple and low powered.
     
  17. ChicagoJoe

    ChicagoJoe New Member

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    SInce you are new to rifles, start with a bolt action .22. I recommend you try Marlin, Savage and CZ before buying. Look at both new and used. Do not put a scope on it until you have mastered iron sights (though you may want to install a good aperture sight).