Rex's its not mine, but it sure is strange.

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by Rex in OTZ, Jul 29, 2014.

  1. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    I didnt see a thread that fills the bill for something different, something you may never have seen or heard of before.

    Here is that something different. :D

    This is one mean looking little Italian.
    Italian Giovanni Merolla is known for a curious weapon with eight barrels. The barrels were assembled in two groups of four, All eight could fire'd at one time or four at a time. This very attractive gun has several uncommon devices.​

    http://www.littlegun.info/arme italienne/ancien artisan/a merolla giovanni gb.htm
     

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    Last edited: Jul 29, 2014
  2. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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  3. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    first self-loading rifle formally adopted by a military

    And who was that nation to first equip its military with a selfloading rifle?
    It is often said that the*1907 Mondragonwas the first self-loading rifle formally adopted by a military, but it turns out this is not quite accurate. In fact, the 1896 Madsen-Rasmussen rifle was produced and adopted more than 10 years earlier (although only in small numbers)
    Denmark with issue of the M1896 Flaadens Reculgevaer.


    http://www.forgottenweapons.com/early-semiauto-rifles/madsen-rasmussen-18881896/


    http://world.guns.ru/rifle/autoloading-rifles/dk/self-loading-rifle-madsen-rasmussen-m196-e.html
     

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    Last edited: Jul 29, 2014
  4. MisterMcCool

    MisterMcCool Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That is one heck of a pepper box. :eek:
     
  5. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    MEIGS .50 calibre, 50 round magazine rifle

    This was just so cool looking i couldnt pass by on this unique prototype 50-shot breech-loading rifle, only three in existence, was invented by Joe vincent Meigs(1840-1907) under U.S. patent N° 54934, issued may 22, 1866.

    http://www.littlegun.info/arme americaine/artisan m/a meigs gb.htm
     

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  6. jakebrake

    jakebrake New Member

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    that's a pepper grinder.
     
  7. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    The brother of another mother the 8x57 & 30-06 Norwegian Krag

    At the very end of Krag development the Norwegians had produced small numbers of updated krags (Not to be confused with low strength US mfg Krags) before they dropped the Krag production for good, according to wikipedia the Norwegians toyed with a concept or a 7.62x51 Nato chamberd Krag.


    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krag-Jørgensen
    German occupation 8x57mm Produced Krags
    During the*occupation of Norway by Nazi Germany, the German forces demanded that Kongsberg Våpenfabrikk build weapons for the German armed forces.
    During the war the model was altered to be externally more like the German*Kar98K. This was achieved by shortening the barrel by 15*cm (6*inches) down to 61.3*cm (24*inches) and shortening the stock by 18*cm (7*inches), and adding a front sight hood similar to that of the Kar98K. These shortened Krag-Jøgensen's were known in Norway as theStomperud-Krag
    Out of the total of 13,450 rifles ordered by the Germans, only between 3,350 and 3,800 were actually delivered.
    http://georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov.tumblr.com/post/32367733252/stomperud-krag

    Post war production Norwegian Krags

    A few Krag-Jørgensen rifles were put together after 1945, for sale to civilian hunters and sharpshooters, among them 1600 of the so-called*Stomperud Krag. While there were at no point any plans for re-equipping the Norwegian Army with the Krag-Jørgensen, attempts were made to adapt it to firing more modern, high-powered ammunition like the*.30-06*and7.62 mm NATO*rounds. While this was found to be possible, it required a new barrel (or relined barrels) and modification to the bolt and receiver. The resulting cost of the conversion was about the same as that of a new gun of a more modern design.The last Krag-Jørgensen rifles in production were the M/1948 Elgrifle (moose rifle), of which 500 were made in 1948–49 and the M/1951 Elgrifle (moose rifle), of which 1000 were made in 1950–51.
     

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  8. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    The mind of Ole Herman Johannes Krag hand gun prototypes.

    Oh what a mind that ol boy had.
    Ole H J Krag constructed his first*repeating rifle*in 1868, which evolved into the Krag-Petersson (aided by*Axel Petersson) by 1872

    He designed a wide range offirearms*during his lifetime, but only two – the*Krag-Peterssonand the*Krag-Jørgensen*– were adopted by any*armed forces. Less than 1,000 Krag-Peterssonrifles*were made for the*Royal Norwegian Navy, while several hundreds of thousands Krag-Jørgensen rifles were made for the*Danish,*Norwegian*and*USarmies.

    http://www.forgottenweapons.com/
    Ole Krag’s Experimental Pistol: Made By Norinco

    In 1908, Ole Krag (the same man associated with the Krag-Jorgensen rifle) applied for a US patent on an automatic pistol design. This design, along with many others, would be submitted to the Norwegian military pistol trials taking place around that time, and would fail to in them (the winner was the Norwegian copy of the Browning 1911, which was adopted as the M1914). Krag’s pistols never did go into serial production at the time, although he made*quite a variety of prototypes. Here are a few of them:
     

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    Last edited: Jul 29, 2014
  9. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Boy, you could aerate someone in a hurry with that one.
     
  10. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    I wish I had a Mondragon... :(
    I would think living this close to the border I could find one... Or at least a Mexican Arisaka... :p


    Those Krags are pretty sweet too!!
     
  11. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Krag prototype the belt fed Krag.

    Thats right way in the past during one those loooong Norwegian nights maybe drinking somebody came up with a belt fed Krag Jørgensen?!

    Krag-Jørgensen rifle modified for belt feed:

    The single prototype of a M1894 modified for belt feed. In the factory museum at Kongsberg Weapon Factory, there is preserved an interesting prototype of a M1894 modified for belt feed. Allthough no documentation has been uncovered, it`s clear that the rifle has been modified at an early stage in the maufacturing process to use the same feed belts as was used on the Hotchkiss heavy machine gun that was in use in the Norwegian Army at the time.

    Then a new idea.
    Lieutenant Tobiensen`s `Speed Loader`:

    The `Speed Loader` mounted on a M1894In 1923 Lieutenant Tobiesen, working at Kongsberg Weapon Factory, designed what he called a `Speed Loader for repeating rifles`. It can be seen as a new attempt to increase the firepower of the Krag-Jørgensen, just as the attempt to convert it to belt feed. Basically, the design consisted of a modified cover that let the user of the rifle attach a magazine from the Madsen light machine gun. The cover had a selectorswitch, allowing the user to select if he wanted to use the Krag-Jørgensen`s internal magazine with its 5 rounds of ammunition, or if he wanted to use the external magazine with 25 rounds.
     

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    Last edited: Jul 30, 2014
  12. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Sylvester Howard Roper,* American Inventor of a slamfire repeating shotgun

    Mr Roper had some pertty inventive ideas for his line of arms. He is also the inventor of the*removable shotgun*choke*and a revolver repeating shotgun.
    initally the shotguns used preloaded steel cartridge primed with a percussion cap and loaded in its 4 round rotary magazine, the hammer is pulled to the rear, indexing a live round at mouth of chamber, pulling the trigger allows the bolt to slam round in chamber and fire the shotgun.
    All known examples of the*Roper revolving*magazine*shotgun*have their barrels threaded for a detachable choke.
    http://milpas.cc/rifles/ZFiles/Sporting Rifles/Roper/Roper.html

    [ame]http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Dev0cQNvceI[/ame]

    http://www.littlegun.info/arme americaine/artisan r/a roper repeating rifle co gb.htm

    http://www.roperld.com/ropersylvester.htm

    http://daimlermotorcycle.com/RoperHistory.htm
     

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  13. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    You want weird?

    dardick.jpg


    You got weird.
     
  14. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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  15. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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  16. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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  17. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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  18. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Landstad 1900 Automatic Revolver- another wild Norwigan firearm

    This handgun is rather odd, 7.5mm magazine fed automatic revolver that ejects spent rounds.


    The*Landstad*revolver*was an*automaticrevolver*of Norwegian origin. The weapon had an unusual feeding device that used both a 2 round cylinder and a grip inserted magazine.
     

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    Last edited: Jul 31, 2014
  19. donthav1

    donthav1 Active Member

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  20. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Stevens 124 shotgun

    I remember seeing my first at a farm sale, lots of folks thought it was a semi auto that was broken, its just a straight pull boltaction though by pulling the bolt handle straight out to the side this releases the locking pin from the side the receiver allowing bolt to cycle, if the locking pin is not fully engaged it blocks the firing pin so you cant fire it till its fully locked closed.
    i had once found a youtube of its function and dissembly. I was not able to find it this week so if i do I'll post its link.