Revolver help...

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by Seth_A7X, Nov 3, 2013.

  1. Seth_A7X

    Seth_A7X New Member

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    Hey guys! I recently went out with my grandpa and fired his .38/.357
    The first handful of times, I was shooting groups under 4 inches. (Best one was 1.8 inches)
    But anyways, the last few times, I was hitting bad groups. Can any of you help me stop shaking and help with technique?
     
  2. aandabooks

    aandabooks New Member

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    Probably fatigue setting in. Work on your forearm, shoulder and hand strength. That will help you shoot more consistently for longer periods of time.
     

  3. gr8oldguy

    gr8oldguy New Member

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    You started anticipating recoil and reacting to it. Very common to shoot well with a "new" gun for a few shots, then the flinching takes over. After my first full cylinder of shots I only load one, leave the other chambers with the spent brass, I close my eyes and give the cylinder a spin. Then I start shooting. It's very frustrating, but an excellent way to control flinching. good luck
     
  4. Seth_A7X

    Seth_A7X New Member

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    Thanks for that tip. Too bad you can't do that with rifles and shotguns..
     
  5. Seth_A7X

    Seth_A7X New Member

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    Alright thanks. And what do you mean by that? Lifting weights?
     
  6. gr8oldguy

    gr8oldguy New Member

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    I'm not much of a long gun fellow. All I have is a lever action 22. I would think you could do the same thing with rifles and shotguns. Get some dummy rounds and have someone else load up your long guns for you, mixing the duds with the live rounds. Just be very careful when you do this to remember to clear your firearms when you're through shooting. While it's good practice, it's also easy to forget and carry a loaded gun home. good luck
     
  7. Seth_A7X

    Seth_A7X New Member

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    Good point. Thanks mister
     
  8. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

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    An excellent point. Anticipating recoil not only ruins the accuracy, it can jam a semiauto (which is mistakenly attributed to limp wristing) A few practical suggestions:

    1. Slow down. Watch your breathing. Get some air in and out, then hold it before you acquire the target and engage. In a string of shots, running out of breath will give you an impulse to shoot faster and "get it over with". It never works.

    2. Don't hold the revolver in a death grip. It will cause muscle tremor. This is not a Glock. Controlling muzzle flip will work better than trying to totally defeat it.

    3. Focus on the front sight. It is better for aiming, but it also reduces the perceived shaking. Our peripheral vision is better at seeing motion. If you focus on the target, you will see the front sight peripherally, and it will seem to shake more, thus unnerving you and compounding the error.

    4. Unless you are handicapped, your arms are strong enough to steady a 2-pound handgun in a two hand grip. Work on it. Where to place each finger is best learned hands on, no pun intended.

    5. For best results, shoot when you feel well and rested. It's all mental. If you are anxious about some stuff, you may not be able to focus 100% on your shooting technique.
     
  9. eatmydust

    eatmydust New Member

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    One more thing to try is - shoot only .38 spl. until you have gotten your groups back down to where you want them, and SQUEEZE the trigger easy, don't jerk it.
     
  10. Mouser

    Mouser Active Member

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    I know my shooting varies as I shoot...often my first salvo is a bit sloppy and my groups really tighten up after that. Depending on what I am shooting, often heavy recoiling guns like 45 auto, 357 magnum and 44 magnum, my shooting accuracy will tend to decline. I think not only physical strength is an opportunity, but also mental strength. Concentration and ultimately lots of practice are the keys. If I sense that I am fatiguing then I will just stop shooting for some period of time, maybe for the day, so as not to develop bad habits.
     
  11. Seth_A7X

    Seth_A7X New Member

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    Alright, thank you all. I will try this when I get back out
     
  12. phildenton

    phildenton New Member

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    I do alot of dry-fire practice, i check, recheck, and check again to make sure the gun is clear, and keep pointed in the safest possible direction. I pit a coin on the top and then practice the dry-fire, both sa and da, the idea is to keep the coin from jumping/falling without having to hold it in place. It has greatly helped me and ive noticed dramatic improvement when i live-fire practice at the local range.
     
  13. Chief-Long-Iron

    Chief-Long-Iron New Member

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    Control your breathing, slow deep steady breaths.
     
  14. dwmiller

    dwmiller Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hearing protectors also play a large part in flinching and "shooting fatigue". A good set of earmuffs, or a cheap set and some foam ear plugs under them often work wonders! I use this trick when teaching women and children who are more sensitive to recoil and blast. Really tightens groups up!

    Makes the gun seem to recoil much less than it actually does, and lets you concentrate on your technique..;)
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2013
  15. dahermit

    dahermit New Member

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    You did not say how and for what purpose you were shooting. If you were shooting clasical off-hand, then advice specific to that sport/method would be appropriate. However, if it was formal or informal combat or hunting practice then you would likely benifit from investigating combat shooting techniques ala, two-handed Weaver or Turret stance. So, the first question should be: What were you trying to do?
     
  16. ninjatoth

    ninjatoth New Member

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    The problems could be something as simple as grip technique or trigger pull position. I have tried so many grip techniques when I started out and none have done me much good except the old combat/police revolver grip I show below. Get a a really strong grip on your support hand, more so than your shooting hand, and that releases any fatigue on your trigger hand/finger. If shooting double action, I pull the trigger right on the pointer finger first joint, single action more towards the tip of my finger. Works for me well, might not for you but give it a try.
     

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  17. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Hold up guys- check date of original question.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2014