Revolver for my sister....

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by DoyleTheDog, Mar 23, 2011.

  1. DoyleTheDog

    DoyleTheDog New Member

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    Hello all. For the past few years my sister and I have shared a house, but in the near future she will finally be getting a place of her own. I've asked her in the past if she would feel comfortable having a pistol in her new place for protection, and she said she would. Knowing my sister, I feel that a revolver would be her best bet. Easy to clean and easy to shoot. I want to get her something chambered in 357mag that way she could practice with 38s and load up 357s at home. Also am looking into heavier, stainless revolvers because I think the heft will help with felt recoil and that would allow her to practice. She'll be buying the gun herself (although I may help out since she's my sis) so I was looking into the Taurus line of revolvers. However, I am not familiar with Taurus and would like some feedback from those who are. Also I'm open to any other suggestions you may have.
     
  2. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

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    For revolvers, stay with S&W and Ruger as that other brand is a crap shoot. A 3 inch SP101 is just about the perfect revolver in my book. Not to large, built very well, and easy to shoot. I have a pair of them and I love them...

    [​IMG]
     

  3. Alchemist

    Alchemist New Member

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  4. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    This is strictly my opinion, and has worked in many years of firearms training, and for men and ladies alike. Buy a handgun just like you would buy a pair of shoes. If Ol' Joe over here says he likes Charlie China tennis shoes, and you're looking for a new pair of shoes, do you run out and buy Joe's pick, just because HE likes 'em? Probably not. If a new shooter is asking what to buy for a carry gun, it doesn't matter what works for you, me, or anyone else. I suggest telling that new shooter to go to many gun shops, and/or gun shows, and handle all the guns they can get hold of. Just like they would try on shoes. Before long they'll be able to make a list of guns that feel ok, pretty good, real good, and "that really feels great in my hands". The last two are the ones to pursue, and here's why I say that....
    If a given handgun doesn't feel "right" in your hands, you'll not shoot it enough to become proficient with it, because it's not comfortable, and you won't like shooting it. Just like you rarely wear shoes that are UNcomfortable. If you're not gonna become proficient with it, save your money, and buy a ball bat to carry. With proper fundamentals, he/she can learn to shoot almost any handgun, or any caliber. Very few folks can re-train their hands to make just any handgun feel comfortable. The last suggestion.........proper shooting techinques, practiced slowly, but proficiently, will breed speed. Do it slowly, and do it the right way, every time.......If you practice speed first, and introduce less efficient techniques into your training, you'll have to do it all over again to get it right.

    By the way..... anyone who introduces a new shooter to our pastime by having them start with a large-caliber handgun, makes a very poor decision. Yes, some folks do ok starting out with large calibers, but the vast majority will not continue to shoot if their very 1st experience is with .50 S&W. Start with a .22 caliber something, and as your technique/accuracy improves, work up from there.

    Again, just my ramblings.... but they work for me...

    Shoot Safely....
     
  5. rjgnwdc

    rjgnwdc New Member Supporter

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    I agree with the caliber choice you are thinking of, and I agree with Jay about the comfort thing... after you get a few opinions and choices take your sister out and let her test them out at a range that rents different firearms or at least to a LGS that has a large selection that she can handle. I also agree with NGIB stick with S&W and Ruger... although I just recently went through a bunch of problems with my first revolver which is a S&W 629 44mag but S&W did respond quickly and eventually replaced it with a brand new one that so far has preformed flawlessly. I've never had any problems with any of my semi-autos... I just saying you may not want to rule out SA's they can be just as dependable and very easy to maintain IMHO
     
  6. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Doyle,

    I also like the Smiths and the Rugers. But I did buy my aunt and a good friend a Taurus 38 Snuby years ago. And they were good weapons. Unless their quality has went down in past years there is nothing wrong with the Taurus revolvers. But as far as a good weight weapon for her I would have to look at the 4" Ruger. And the caliber is a good choice for her because you can even shoot 38s and 38 wad cutters in the 357 mag pistol. Which is great for target practice and learning to use the revolver properly. Then load it with good 357 defense loads for protection. I would also think the 4" barrel would be a good choice. Shorter barrels for the novice is not usually a good confidence builder unless you have them shoot 5 yards an in. That's my two cents!
    Having her try some weapons before purchasing as one of the other guys mentioned is a great idea. And also the one that fits and she shoots the best!
    Good Luck!

    03
     
  7. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

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    Promising for doing what? The Judge is a gimmick gun and so is this one IMHO...
     
  8. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    Short barrel, light weight = much more perceived recoil.... physics... up to each individual, but don't let the obvious escape you....
     
  9. DoyleTheDog

    DoyleTheDog New Member

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    Yeah I was actually thinking of the 3" SP101 at first... I just got myself a 4" GP100 and am very pleased with it!!! I thought about the Taurus line because they're a bit cheaper, but then I realized she probably wouldn't mind a used firearm. I'll go take a look at BudsGunShop to get an idea on some prices for a semi-used SP101. Thanks for all the replies!!
     
  10. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    I was thinking "used GP100". I bought a 6" blued one last year for about $400, NIB (though there is a oily spot by the hammer). My future sister in law loves shooting my GP100 & comments that it "kicks" much less than her .38 Titan. Go for the longer barrel; if nothing else, it will make a better club.
     
  11. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    I am a female and for my first gun I have a Ruger GP100, 6" barrel, stainless. I like the gun and the recoil isn't bad at all, in my opinion. It's a 'big' gun but I think that helps with the recoil. That's is my recommendation and my experience.
     
  12. Troy Michalik

    Troy Michalik Is it Friday yet? Supporter

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    Not if you say the name with a British accent . . . . . . . . . The Gov'na :D

    But, yeah; not one I would suggest as a first firearm either. Doyle, get some in her hands. Take her to the store and let her try on a few. They may be a bit pricey-er, but try the some in the Lady Smith line.
     
  13. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    [​IMG]

    There are two perfect guns for this application, both I would trust my life with and also my sister's.

    The first is way too expensive. (But we all need a bucket list!)

    [​IMG]

    The Colt Python.

    And the second I picked up for <$400.

    [​IMG]

    The S&W M19-3.

    As you can see I prefer 6" barrels but for your sister I think a 4" would be a tad more manageable.

    You can't go wrong with a vintage S&W wheel gun!
     
  14. DoyleTheDog

    DoyleTheDog New Member

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    Dang, Cane... I think my sister would have to fight me for a Colt Python!! I am thinking that a longer barrel would be better (4 to 6) than a snubby. She says she wants a little revolver, but if I let her shoot my GP100 she may change her mind and want something more like it.
     
  15. DaveinCA

    DaveinCA New Member

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    For whatever it's worth, I really like the Ruger LCR with 38 SPL +P hollow points. And being hammerless, it would be easy to fire from pocket or purse, if necessary.
     
  16. WDB

    WDB New Member

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    The heft might make it something she puts in the sock drawer and forgets. My suggestion would be a S&W Airweight or a Ruger LCR.

    Something like this
     

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  17. DoyleTheDog

    DoyleTheDog New Member

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    Keep in mind WDB that this is only a weapon she needs for home defense. My sister has no interest in getting a ccw... A heavier gun would encourage her to practice more because of the less felt recoil.
     
  18. WDB

    WDB New Member

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    Yep I got that, just thinking the lighter weight might feel better in hand and be easier to obtain target. With some over sized rubber grips the recoil wouldn't be that much more. My daughter (5'-4" 115 pounds) shoots well with my airweight. She doen't care for my S&W 586 at all due to the weight.
     
  19. DoyleTheDog

    DoyleTheDog New Member

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    Yeah, I see your point. I just need to get her to shoot both and go from there. She may be surprised and end up wanting a light weight revolver.