Revolver cleaning

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by nixfix, Jun 12, 2013.

  1. nixfix

    nixfix New Member

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    I am looking for some tips. I recently purchased a Smith 629, which is my first wheel gun. Had a great time shooting it, then went home to clean and the powder (lead?) at the front of the cylinder will not come off no matter what I try. First I tried CLP, then Gunscrubber but neither one does a thing to those marks no matter how much elbow grease I put into it.

    The gun is stainless finish.

    Tips?
     
  2. CPO15

    CPO15 New Member

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    Lead-removing cloth, cut into patch-sized squares, rub manually on cylinder face or Mother's Mag polish. Some folks say to leave the fouling on until it interferes with function, but I'm a little OC about my shiny guns.
     

  3. nixfix

    nixfix New Member

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    I'll try that. Like you, I am a cleaning freak and this bothers me to no end.
     
  4. 25-5

    25-5 New Member

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    There is a thread running titled 629. Many options discussed. I use the Birchwood Casey lead cloth too, but the 629 thread is interesting.
     
  5. CPO15

    CPO15 New Member

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    Just to give you the full story; some folks will argue ( w/ documentation) that the lead removal will also remove the cylinder material. It may do so, but not enough to matter in my lifetime.
     
  6. zebramochaman

    zebramochaman New Member

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    I use Lead Free cloths from Kleenbore on my stainless revolvers. You are not supposed to use it on blued finishes.
     
  7. ninjatoth

    ninjatoth New Member

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    I use chrome cleaner, it will all come off in about 10 seconds, I imagine any automotive cleaner designed to remove brake dust or clean wheels will have the same effect, but after I use it I clean the cylinder face with my normal methods to make sure there is no chrome cleaner residue.
     
  8. danolator

    danolator New Member

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    I cut a scotch pad into squares, dip a square into Hoppes, and scrub it off. Doesn't come off in 10 seconds, but it works. It helps to wet it down with Hoppes and soak for a couple hours. I cut the Scotch pads into about six squares (one square per cleaning). There is a YouTube vid on this somewhere.
     
  9. Fisherking

    Fisherking New Member

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    I dont know if u have acsess to a ultra sonic cleaner . But I would remove the crane screw just above the trigger slide the yoke out and place the cylinder in th ultrasonic cleaner. I did this for two cycles of 30 min and it took carbon off that scrubbing with a brass brush didnt take off ...
    F.k.
     
  10. levelcross

    levelcross New Member

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    Kano Kroil works wonders on my SP 101, she was loaned out to a good friend and he tried and tried to get her clean again with no success. Another friend recommended Kroil and it took a little soaking time but she was spotless the next day. :D
     
  11. phildenton

    phildenton New Member

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    My favorite lubricant for my shootin irons is (dont laugh) auto trans fluid. Great for a 22 pocket semi in cold weather, long term storage, etc. Its the main ingredient in "eds red" which is good cleaner/lube, cheap too.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2013
  12. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    I made a wheel out of cardboard, put it on a dremel, and used an extremely light and fast touch.

    Probably one of the more abusive methods, but it didn't even deface the brushed finish, so I'd have to say it probably didn't damage anything.
     
  13. nixfix

    nixfix New Member

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    Ok, lead-away cloth worked great. I also switched to Fireclean and after the last range session, everything came off without using lead-away :eek: Might be time to retire to ole' CLP.
     
  14. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Be careful cleaning too much with lead removers. They are all abrasive to some extent. Too much cleaning opens the gap between the cylinder and forcing cone which leads to more flame cutting and leading issues.

    I only clean the cylinder face of lead if the cylinder starts to bind and not spin freely.

    Clp isnt a lead remover as it has no abrasive properties. It is however a reallly good remover of powder fouling.

    Burnt carbon in the form of carbon rings can be removed throiugh prolonged soaking but i wouldnt advise frequent removal by abrasives or scraping.
     
  15. Fisherking

    Fisherking New Member

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    Outers has an electric bore cleaner . It works on the princaple of reverse electrolice sp lol.
    F.k.
     
  16. weaselfire

    weaselfire Member

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    These are pretty easy to DIY as well.

    Jeff
     
  17. johnbrowning

    johnbrowning New Member

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    I have only 1 stainless it's a 625. I didn't realize the front of the cylinder was suppose to be shiny, after all the rest of my revolvers are blue. After reading forums I found out the burnt crap was suppose to come off. So I used some elbow grease a copper brush and some Hoppes, scrubbed and scrubbed. Shiny, how 'bout that.
     
  18. Firenailer

    Firenailer New Member

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    I try to keep it nice and clean with that same Hoppes and brass brush technique, but a few shots at the range and its right back to black. It really is the hardest part to keep clean.
     
  19. Mark F

    Mark F New Member Supporter

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    Just a little dab of FLITZ on a rag, and the powder stains are GONE! That's all I use on my S&W Magnums.
     
  20. johnbrowning

    johnbrowning New Member

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    meant to say brass. I guess copper would turn everything green