Remy 700 Trigger

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by mrm14, Jan 21, 2009.

  1. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    I'm putting togeather a new Rem 700 longrange target rifle and have pretty much decided to put a Jewll trigger in it. However, today I found on the internet The Huber Concepts trigger. Anyone out there have any experience with this trigger group?
     
  2. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Well-Known Member

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    I don't see why you don't rework the factory trigger-they can be made pretty slick. Jewell and Shilen triggers are hard to beat. If you want a single set trigger, Canjar (Denver Co) triggers RULE the roost.
     

  3. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    For a long range shooter or any kind of compatition rifle built on a 700 action then you are going to want a Jewell trigger. I don't care what you do to a factory remington trigger they will never be as good as a Jewell trigger.

    I have a timney only because I could not afford a jewell at the time I bought my trigger. I would also buy a new firing pin group as well. the factory Remington units leave a lot to be desired they round over the edges at the sear engagement so you get a piss poor feel on the trigger. I installed a Callahan Remington 700 Traditional Non-ISS Firing Pin Assembly and man it made such a difference in my trigger pull and feel. What used to break like a rusty hammer not breaks like glass with lard and butter on it.

    If this is only going to be a target rifle you are going to want to look at the 2 to 8oz trigger if it is going to be a multi-use rifle look at the 8oz to 4 # trigger.
     
  4. hillbilly68

    hillbilly68 New Member

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    I was about to submit a similar question; which one to get or just get the factory adjusted (it has one of the new "adjustable" triggers). From everything I have read you gents are right on the mark, ditch the factory altogether.
     
  5. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    Ah, it depends on who is doing the trigger job and how they do it. We frequently do trigger jobs on factory rifle triggers and we even tune the grap GI Issue AR triggers if the customer is on a budget.

    It's all about how you do it, and you have to be able to do it well to avoid any slam-fire situations.

    If you are NOT on a budget, then Jewell is a great choice. Having said that, I don't think of the Jewell triggers as "field" or tactical triggers, but more of a competition trigger as mentioned above.

    I put a Timney in my .308 Tactical Rig and that thing hasn't missed a beat since we installed it. Tuned it to just under 2#'s and it's crisp, clean and breaks like a glass rod. For my first long gun in probably 15 years, it was perfect for the application.

    On my new 7mm project I believe I went with Rifle Basix and it's tuned to just under 1.5# - though it needs a wee bit of work now that it's been out and back to Lone Wolf and is now sitting in her final resting space. Might be able to fine tune it a little more.

    It all depends on what you final goal is. A competent gunsmith should be able to tune a factory trigger down to a good 2# pull with no problem. A good one can tune it down to anything you want and do it safely.

    If you have the money, and you want one of the best, Jewell is definitely up there on that list. But, you have to factor in what type of "work" the rifle will be asked to do....

    JD
     
  6. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    Today I puchased the the Jewell Trigger and the Pierce fireing pin assembly. I've torn down the rifle and am in the process on deciding on the barrel and muzzle break I want to use. Also, finished stripping the blueing on the parts I'll be keeping as I intend to have the whole gun parkerized. Gunsmith will be getting the reciever tomorrow to lap and tune the action. This is a long action .300 Win Mag.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2009
  7. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    there is only two places I would even think of purchasing a barrel from right now.

    The best rifling type is single point cut rifling. This is where they take a barrel blank and cut one grove at a time with a small hook type cutter. This process does not add any stress to the barrel thus relieving the stress does not have to be done. Krieger barrels and Bartlein barrels are the top two companies for cut rifling. Bartlin was started by 3 or 4 guys that left Kreiger. So you know they are top notch. Button rifling is worthless in my mind as it add's stress to the barrel and can leave a less uniform land and grove diameter.

    Are you going to stick to 300win mag? Or are you going to go for a different round. Seen a guy shooting 12" groups at 1000 yard with a 300 ackley mag. which is a 300 weatherby with the double radius blown out to a 35* shoulder and a slightly longer neck. That rifle was also a 30# beast with a 30" tube and a free floated action. The barrel was epoxied to the stock with a 12" long alum block this was all in a McMillan stock. That thing was bad azz for 1000 yard bench rest.
     
  8. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    I would add one maker to that impressive list Tango - Mike Rock 5R barrels are in the same beighborhood as Krieger and are made the same way, single point cut rifling. Very good barrels that perform as advertised...

    JD
     
  9. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    I have spoken to Krieger Barrles and am looking at a 30" long, #9, fluted barrel with a 1 in 12 twist and their muzzel break. I am planning on sticking with the .300 win mag. May call Bartlin because Krieger is 6 to 7 months out on orders. Have Nozler brass and CCI BR2 primers. Looking at Berger 210 grain Match target boat tails as well as their 175 grain Match target boat tails. Probably will use IMR 4350 powder but am not quite decided on this yet. Also still haven't totally decided on the stock yet. Have been looking at the McMillan A5 as this long range shooting club I've been talking to shoots mostly in the prone position. They say that the A5 is good for this and it lends itself well to bench rests due to the taper in the forestock over the A4. McMillan is also 3 to 4 months out on filling orders.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2009
  10. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    If it were me and I had to choose I would go with the 210gr and have the barrel set up by my gunsmith specific to the 210gr bullets. but that is me.

    That McMillan A-5 is a sweet stock and is worth every dime you would spend on it. Shot a few rifles with one and man oh man. If I could afford on I would get one.

    I have found that IMR powders while good provide a lot more fouling than other Hodgdon powders. Might give a loooksee at the Allient RL 19, 22, or 25 for your app as well. I had good luck with RL15 in my 308 and I got some RL10X for my 223.

    Here go check out some of these rifles. They are mostly bench guns but they can offer some different ideas.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2009
  11. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    Krieger talked up the 210 grain bullet quite favorably. They claimed that their employees that shoot long range have been playing with the 210 grain and have been seeing remarkable results at 1000 yards. Right now I'm pulling my hair nearly out trying to decide what detachable magazine bottom metal I should use. Have any suggestions? I think I'll also start a new thread on this bottom metal query.