Removing shellac and Tung Oil

Discussion in 'Engraving & Refinishing' started by ARnoob, Jul 28, 2010.

  1. ARnoob

    ARnoob New Member

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    I redid some of the Bulgy handguards that I bought. I bleached the wood and applied 4 coats of Tung Oil on the lower HG. I then put about 4 coats of shellac on top. The color of the HG is lighter than the top HG and the stock.

    I was thinking of removing the shellac with denatured alcohol and also removing the tung oil. I was also thinking of putting some Tru Oil on the lower HG to darken it a bit and better match the upper HG.

    What's the best way to remove the tung oil and shellac? Thanks.
     
  2. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    One question: Why did you apply shellac over tung oil? To answer your question though, any wood stripper should work for you in removing the finish's that you applied.

    Maybe your post was a bit confusing to me. Did you mean that you put T.O. on the lower HG and then Shellac on the upper HG ?
     

  3. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    As was said, any stripper will remove the finish. I suggest that when you're down to the bare wood that you pick up a small can of stain that closely matches the darker of the woods. If you buy an oil based stain, use an oil finish for your final coats. Tru Oil is a good finish and you can make it as dull or as glossy as you want.
     
  4. ARnoob

    ARnoob New Member

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    Yeah, sorry about the confusion. I put Tung Oil on all the furniture, and then used shellac as a sealer. I'm not sure of that was good or bad, but it looks nice. I just don't care for the color of the lower HG. I have some Bix stripper that I'll use tonight.

    My plan was to strip the furniture, and then add the Tru Oil. I think that the Tru Oil will give it the darker hue that's needed to match the upper HG.

    When I get home I'll post some pics so you can what I'm working with.
     
  5. ARnoob

    ARnoob New Member

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    Will shellac be ok as a sealer over Tru Oil?
     
  6. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    I'm not sure. Sorry.

    If you want to stay with a fairly stock look, just stain the parts with a water based stain to match and then use shellac and be done with it. Oil and then shellac is redundant and really not necessary.
     
  7. ARnoob

    ARnoob New Member

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    Here are some pics of the wood furniture finished in Tung Oil and shellac. After looking at them again, I'm not sure that I should start over. What do you guys think?
     

    Attached Files:

  8. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    There isn't that much difference in the color if the pics are good. If that's the case, call it done and put it back together. It's a rifle, not a piano. :cool:
     
  9. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    Agreed... They look fine to me also.

    To answer your question about using shellac as a sealer? It's not necessary. The Tru oil or BLO or Tung Oil would seal the wood just fine. No need to be redundant.
     
  10. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Here's the bottom line, you have three pieces of furniture with three different grain run directions.

    YOU WILL NEVER GET THEM TO MATCH! (Unless you paint them solid.)

    Do one of the following two options:

    1. Put the damn thing back together and be extremely proud of your work, and justifiably so!

    2. If you have a piece that is lighter than the other two, and you MUST try to correct it, strip it completely to bare wood. Take a Bernz-Torch with a flame spreader and LIGHTLY go over the wood to enhance the grain. What happens is the softer pulp wood burns and darkens and the harder grain remains in contrast. GO EASY, don't charcoal the part! After a few passes do a light sanding or steel wool and if more contrast is desired go back after it with the torch.​

    Remember Occam's razor, or the law of parsimony. In science, the simplest theory that fits the facts of a problem is the one that should be selected. (SEE # 1 above)
     
  11. ARnoob

    ARnoob New Member

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    You know, I have to agree.
     
  12. ARnoob

    ARnoob New Member

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    Thanks. You're right. I'm going to just leave it as it, and be happy with it. :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2010
  13. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Good deal. Please post some pics of the finished project.
     
  14. ARnoob

    ARnoob New Member

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    You bet! :)
     
  15. ARnoob

    ARnoob New Member

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    Here you go....
     

    Attached Files:

  16. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    It came out great! Nice job. :cool:
     
  17. ARnoob

    ARnoob New Member

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    Thanks, and thanks for the tips.
     
  18. MajorCordite

    MajorCordite New Member

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    Not to take away from the above fellow's project. Why do most people put
    a "piano" finish on a military firearm? If we collect military firearms then
    we need to finish them accordingly. I see guys all the time trying to duplicate a Weatherby Over and Under LTD edition finish on an M1 Garand. It's like putting patten leather shoes on with your coveralls. Shellac? Good for an undercoat or as a sealer, but as a topcoat it will turn white if it gets wet. There are dozens of finishes that can be used on firearms that will give you superior
    results. You don't want candy apple red metal flake on your duck boat and you don't want a polished mirror finish on your military rifle. Unless, of course you are marching in a parade! Then chrome the bayonet. ;)
     
  19. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    Ditto ARnoob very nice work!

    Major, welcome to the FTF..This being your first posting, I'd advise that you go to the intro thread and tell us a little about yourself.. that being said, to some extent I agree with your comments concerning putting too much spit and polish into our firearms "HOWEVER", as you may already know, some battle rifles come with shelac finishes already on them for example the Mosin Nagant.

    I'm a proponent of restoring old milsurps and have been doing so for several years. Most of the stock work I do ends up with probably more sheen to it than came from the factory but then again I'm taking steps to preserve the finish and want the wood and the firearm to last for many more years to come. I don't intend to ever take the rifle into battle as was the case when they were first built so feel somewhat justified in applying a better finish to my projects. I would go far enough to argue that in some cases the finish I've applied may be just the same finish that the firearm had when it was first fielded.

    In either case, you've got purists and you've got restorers.. Purists love the dents and dings and restorers don't.
     
  20. csapow

    csapow New Member

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    They all look good. What did you do to get the red AK color?