Removing rust

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing Forum' started by mrasgt, Jan 24, 2010.

  1. mrasgt

    mrasgt New Member

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    Hi All,

    I got an old Remington .22 LR rifle given to me. Functions perfectly.:)

    I did a search but could'nt find anything matching what I'd like to do.

    On the barrell, I have what I hope is surface rust. I can't quite tell if it's into the blueing yet.

    So far, I've been told to use 0000 steel wool and Hopes. Slowly and carefully.I haven't started yet, I don't want to go into the blueing.:confused:

    Is there any other solvent/cleaner/implement I can try that would help me? I have in the past tried "Flitz" and it went way too far.

    The gun is'nt worth re blueing.

    Thanks for any input.

    Regards,

    Mark
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2010
  2. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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  3. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    STOP RIGHT THERE.

    Using CLR will remove any and all bluing left on the rifle. Seeing as Bluing is a form of controlled RUST.

    Step 1: Rub rifle down with a good cloth and hoppes #9

    Let it soak for 10 to 15 minutes.

    Step 2: Wipe down and see if rust is still present.

    If No: take other cloth (Silicone gun cleaning cloth or cloth soaked in Rem oil) and put a light coat of oil on ALL Metal parts.

    If yes: Go to Step three

    Step 3: get 0000 or 000 steel wool and hoppes #9 and apply hoppes to steel wool and gently (Like you are rubbing on your lady) run in a circular motion (Think Karate Kid wax on wax off) never applying too much pressure. Once you see some rust coming off stop and wipe down to see how much and how deep rust is. If some has come off and it looks light then keep going with step 3.

    If you have pitting you will know once you're done with step three. If you have pitting then you are going to need to do a lot more work that may involve draw filing and sanding along with rebluing the rife.
     
  4. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

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    Thanks for catching that. I have never tried CLR on a rifle but was given that advice before. Glad to know the FTF peer review process works to keep boneheaded suggestions from being followed.
     
  5. Gatekeeper

    Gatekeeper New Member

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    I like Tango's method, but I'd use PB Blaster instead of hoppes.
    Its a penetrating oil used for breaking free rusted bolts and parts. Ive used it for years cleaning up firearms. Doesn't hurt bluing.
    Look for it at your auto parts store.------Gate
    [​IMG]
     
  6. mrasgt

    mrasgt New Member

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    PB

    Wow...that was close.....I almost started w/ CLR figuring it had a little bit of grit to it.

    I use PB Blaster all the time on my truck, never thought of it for this use.

    Thanks everyone, I'll start by reading all the references by Cane.

    Anyone else please chime in.

    There's three feet of snow on the ground here and I'm going crazy for something to do, so I pulled this old Remington out.

    I could do some kind of tank in the basement, I'm used to my garage, but it's too damn cold right now.
     
  7. mrasgt

    mrasgt New Member

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    Western Auto

    Hey Cane!

    I just saw your re-do on the western auto.

    Excellent idea. Any updated pics of the newer finish?

    I didnt want to pay someone to re-blue mine, but if the rust is to much, you've given me some great ideas.

    What I've got is a Remington ,smooth bore .22 pump. I'd never seen one before.

    Anyone here tell me about it? Apparently, from what I can find, it was marketed at the time as a child Bird gun sort of thing.

    Anyone?
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2010
  8. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Rather than CLR, try CLP- Cleaner, Lubricate, Protector.

    PB Blaster is great stuff- so is Kroil. Both super penetrating oils. I wet surface, wrap, let marinate for hours/a day. Rub with a clean cloth, changing area in contact frequently. For HEAVY rust, after soaking, use 0000 steel wool soaked in Kroil. For REALLY heavy rust, a brass pot scrubber soaked in Kroil. Some folks used to recommend the edge of a penny for heavy rust- but that was when they were made of copper, not copper plated zinc.

    As the man said, remember bluing is black iron oxide. Any chemical that removes rust (red iron oxide) WILL remove bluing. Any mechanical polishing (Flitz, Brasso, steel wool, 80 grit sandpaper) WILL wear thru the very thin layer of bluing if you rub too much. The penetrating oil and clean, soft cloth is about the least abrasive that works. Slow, time consuming, but it works. Heck, sit there and rub the rifle down while watching TV or something.
     
  9. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Remington did a couple of smoothbore 22 pumps. These were not kids guns- but they were used for an indoor version of trap- called (IIRC) MossKeetTo. The 572 was the most common- and there was a smoothbore 121. Careful on the refinishing- these can be worth some bucks. Saw an Excellent grade 121 up for sale for $1K+ and the 572 is several hundred. Congratulations!
     
  10. mrasgt

    mrasgt New Member

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    Model #

    I just checked the model number, It's a Remington " Fieldmaster Model 121 "

    tube fed, wood has only some scratches.

    I carefully checked the bore, then put three rounds thru it, and the function was perfect.

    I have'nt touched it yet, I want to go slowly in case I got something here.

    I don't know what to do with the serial number or how/if I can track it to get an age on it.

    M
     
  11. Gatekeeper

    Gatekeeper New Member

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  12. Gatekeeper

    Gatekeeper New Member

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    Barrel code location from above link
    BarrelCodes.jpg
     
  13. mrasgt

    mrasgt New Member

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    Rust/serial number

    The serial number is on the the left side {flat} of the reciever just over a big screw. Not on the barrell.

    I'm working on pics, but I got a cheap dig camera.
     
  14. Gatekeeper

    Gatekeeper New Member

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    The serial#'s are on the receiver but there should be at least two letters stamped on the barrel, that would be the date code.
    Look on the left side of the barrel just in front of the receiver. It may be pretty faint. You have to look close to see it on my 1945 remington 141.
    All remington rifles from 1922-present should have 'em, if its not there then its older or I'm :confused:
     
  15. mrasgt

    mrasgt New Member

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    rust/serial number

    without a magnafying glass it looks like a traingle then xpp
     
  16. mrasgt

    mrasgt New Member

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    rust/ser

    Ok, if I'm doing this right, it looks like December 1945???
     
  17. Gatekeeper

    Gatekeeper New Member

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    You got it!!:D
    My G'paps old 141 Gamemaster was L PP Thats Feb 1945
     
  18. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Well-Known Member

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    0000 steel wool is fine enough that it won't hurt your bluing. If the bluing is gone underneath the rust-it's because it (rust) was already deeper than the surface anyway.
     
  19. dteed4094

    dteed4094 New Member

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    rust removal

    I thought I'd give it a try. If this works I'll be headed for the barrel of barreled actions at the little country gun shop I spend some time at. I will expound on the clamp connections so I can do multiple pieces at once. As it looks the screw between the two sissor halves is not an adaquate connection to work on the second half. I'll also find out if the water used in the process will freeze at 25 degrees, the temp in my garage when I started. DO NOT HOOK IT UP LIKE THIS, THE WIRES ARE REVERSED. NEG to the PART, POS to the ANODE. SORRY
    rust1.jpg
    rust2.jpg
    rust3.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2010