Remington model 1902 rolling block

Discussion in 'Curio & Relic Discussion' started by string1946, Apr 27, 2014.

  1. string1946

    string1946 New Member

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    I just bought a Remington 1902 rolling block rifle chambered in 7mm Mauser on Gunbroker. My collection didn't include RB and by golly it needed one. I have been doing some reading and of course opinions on the net vary widely. Some say the the chambers were cut a little longer than modern ammo specs causing a headspace issue. Some say its not the chamber but flex in the action that can cause stretched cases and possible failure. And of course some say buy factory ammo, go forth and be happy. I'm leaning toward handloading my ammo on the light side. Then you get into using 7mm Mauser brass and neck sizing just enough so the action will close making a false shoulder and fire forming to fit the chamber then after the first time, just neck size. Then there is the school that say about the same but use 270 Win. Brass or even using surplus 30-06 brass. I have plenty of both. I would be interested opinions?
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2014
  2. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    I had one of those for many years. Yes mine would shoot factory loads but did have the normal chamber issues. I reloaded all my ammo for it and only neck sized them. Mine liked 160 grain bullets the best but about 1-1/4" groups were as good as I could get out of it. Took some mule deer deer with it. When I got it the trigger pull was 13 lbs.
     

  3. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    String,

    Fantastic find! Also where is the pics!

    03
     
  4. string1946

    string1946 New Member

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    I just bought it today and won't have it in my grubby little hands till probably early next week. Pics to follow as soon as possible.
     
  5. string1946

    string1946 New Member

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    Thanks hiwall. Did you do any thing to your trigger? I have read of grinding the trigger and or hammer spring narrower but as long as it doesn't take two hands to pull the trigger I'll probably leave it alone. I just have personal issues modifying any old soldiers. If they come to me original I usually leave them that way unless they are so bad I can't avoid giving them a little help. I like to get the feel of what the original users experenced.
     
  6. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    I redid (customized) the one I had. I shortened the barrel, drilled and tapped for a scope, put on fancy wood, did a trigger job the whole 9 yards. To each their own.
     
  7. Fun old smokepole

    I had a Mexican rolling block several winters ago. As it was primarily issued to 'Rurales' - the 'rural' and therefore non-regular troops in some senses of the word - the rifles were intended to be shot with issued ammo and reloading wasn't an issue. Also, the Mexican government of the time left the triggers heavy for safety purposes. The one I had was pretty safe.

    My intent was to use it for 'Cowboy' shooting in the single shot rifle category.

    I loaded it with jacketed bullets of 175 grain weight, as that was the 'standard' loading, but kept pressures and velocities on the low end. Between the coarse sights and the trigger pull, accuracy was more or less 'minute of fat guy'. It would shoot - sights, trigger pull and all - in the 6 MOA range. I don't recall the exact powder charge I used, but it was the slowest powder I could get that would still operate correctly and give reasonable velocities. Slower powder tends to generate a gentler pressure curve and therefore less strain on older guns. (Newer ones as well, for that matter.) If I recall correctly it was IMR 4831 or H4831 and the lowest safe charge in the manual.

    I never fooled with the trigger. It was just on the edge between 'heavy' and 'absurd'.
     
  8. string1946

    string1946 New Member

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    Ok here are some pictures. Its really in better shape than it looked like in the pictures on Gunbroker. I have no idea of its history as there are no markings on it other than the ones in the pictures and a U on the barrel bands. It has a bayonet lug so it is military from somewhere I just don't know where. I know some were used in Mexico
     

    Attached Files:

  9. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Looks good String. If you are worried about what it will handle, take it to a smith and have the headspace checked. i don't have a rolling block yet, but I am familiar with the 7X57 MM rounds. I run mostly commercial 160 to 175 grain 7 mm in my 1916 Spanish short rifle with no issues, and it is a pattern 1 (built from an existing 1893 rifle), so factory loads should be no issue if all check s out.

    Enjoy your new rifle, and looking forward to a range report when you get time.
     
  10. string1946

    string1946 New Member

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    Thanks. The trigger is heavy but managable. Maybe I should have a contest to see if anyone can guess how many spent primers are in the half gallon jar in the background but then I'm not counting those suckers but it does weigh 12 pounds.
     
  11. KS95B40

    KS95B40 New Member

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    I have the same model Rolling Block. The chamber is different enough from 7x57 that some call it the 7mm Spanish instead of 7mm Mauser. I fired factory loaded ammo in mine when I first got it in the '80s but now fireform all of my brass and only neck size. Mine is a very accurate shooter and took one whitetail deer (on it's only hunt) at about 120 yards. I have thought about mounting a long tube Malcolm scope on it but I'm hesitant to drill and tap the barrel for the mounts.

    I have a very good article on the "7mm Spanish" cartridge that I can e-mail to you, PM me if you have any interest and I will send it to you.
     
  12. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Mixed lot on the primers or all the same type and brand? :D

    might be worth doing the math if the prize is right. ;)