remington 700 replacement safety info and install

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by Pjj342, Aug 15, 2011.

  1. Pjj342

    Pjj342 New Member

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    I was talking to a friend. He has an old remington 700, one that may have the so called 'faulty safety' the news ranted on for a few days. He said he wanted it replaced and asked me if I could do it. I could make a few dollars on the deal so I wanted to see what this involved.

    I could only find a 'rifle basix' replacement safety, for models before 2006. And thats about it, except a three position safety, from midway usa, that involves drilling and taking steel off in a couple spots. Other than that I can find nothing on the subject. My googles didnt turn up much.

    If someone could tell me, would the rifle basix safety do away with the problem or is it the exact same as factory? Id think the three position would, but I dont want to risk messing it up, without a ton of research.

    Id really think there would be a lot more info on this topic than Im finding, being as it was on the news and caused a stir for a week or so.

    If theres any other info you guys have Id greatly appreciate it.
     
  2. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    The reason you dont see much is because it was basically a giant lie put out by msnbc.
     

  3. Pjj342

    Pjj342 New Member

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    Ok that actually sounds probable, I dont really trust the news company to give anything accurate.

    but Im wondering, is there a different safety to put on the rem 700, other than the factory, that would make him happy. Or is the three stage safety my only option?
     
  4. ninjatoth

    ninjatoth New Member

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    My uncle almost shot my other uncle's head off with one and they for d@mn sure weren't being careless or unexperienced,the gun fired while they were sitting while hunting with nothing near the trigger,it was an emotional experience to say the least for them.
     
  5. Wambli

    Wambli Member

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    Unless you are going for a different type (like the 3 position) you normally do not just replace the factory safety. As a matter of fact with some aftermarket triggers you swap the trigger out and keep the factory safety. If he's really afraid of the gun I would just replace the whole trigger with a Timney or similar.

    The issue of the "faulty safeties" has been discussed to death. Some folks (I being one of them) are convinced that the incidents cited by the media were all because of kitchen gunsmithing with the factory triggers. If you do research on the subject you'll find out that just about none of the handful of suits have stuck and they are still making the gun with a newer design trigger that is tougher for the owner to jack with...
     
  6. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Tell him the safety is just fine. Remember the exploding gas tanks on Chevy trucks? All a lie and done by the same people. If he is not happy with that answer, tell him to trade it in on a nice Savage or Winchester. He will not ever be happy with it.
     
  7. Pjj342

    Pjj342 New Member

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    I dont think it has much to do with fear of accidental firing. Its a gun hes had for a long time, and from , I think, seeing that stuff on the news, has put this thought in his head.
    He also said about getting a lighter trigger in it, so ill check that out also.
     
  8. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    did he buy it second hand?? a previous owner or a backroom gunsmith somewhere in the weapon's history "lightening" the trigger causes issue like that. its not just a remington problem. bubba'ing a sear is the cause of guns going off with no finger on the trigger.

    most nd are caused by people who swear on a stack of bibles they didnt have a finger on the trigger. not saying he is lying. its just how the mind works.

    a buddy of mine almost shot himself holstering his 1911 bullet left a red mark on his leg he swore up and down he didnt pull the trigger but i watched him do it. finger in the guard gun went in the holster finger hit the trigger. he still swears to this day he didnt pull the trigger. i still give him hell for it.

    if he is that scared of it best to sell it and get a different gun.
     
  9. moneymaker17

    moneymaker17 New Member

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    i have a rem 700 in 7mm mag,, i was fooling around with it,, (unloaded:eek:)
    and if you have the finger on the trigger, just barley touching it, and take saftey off, it will fire, very scary, but i only put one shell in at a time, and only do it if im pointing down range
     
  10. Wambli

    Wambli Member

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    Why would you ever do that? :confused:
     
  11. natman

    natman Member

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    So this has raised its head again.
    Let’s take a look at some of the objections:

    "It’s an anti-gun conspiracy / CNBC is biased."

    Yes, CNBC is biased, and their story contains slanted perspectives and misleading information. What did you expect? However, just because the presentation is biased doesn’t necessarily mean that the core issue isn’t true.

    "It must be caused by people fiddling with their trigger adjustments."

    No doubt some of the problems are indeed due to improper adjustments. However there are lots of rifles that have adjustable triggers that don’t have anywhere near as many complaints. Something else is going on.

    So let's take a look at what it is:

    Here's the Remington 700 trigger cocked:

    [​IMG]

    The Remington 700 trigger is a bit unusual in that it uses an extra piece, the trigger connector, to refine the trigger pull. The tiny red area is the engagement between the connector and the sear.

    When the trigger is pulled, the connector goes forward and returns to this position:

    [​IMG]
    For this trigger to operate safely it is essential that when the rifle is cocked the trigger connector return 100% to the proper position, pushed there by only the light weight trigger spring.

    See the red area between the trigger shoe and the trigger connector when the rifle is uncocked? That's the problem area. Any tiny speck of dirt, rust, ice or other material that gets in there will prevent the connector from engaging the sear properly. This can result in the safety keeping the sear from falling instead of the trigger connector. When the safety is released, the gun fires.

    With all this in mind, let's take a look at a couple more objections:

    “I’ve owned a Remington 700 for forty years and fired thousands of rounds and never had a problem.”

    Good for you. This problem doesn’t happen very often, simply because it’s fairly difficult for stuff to work its way into the proper area of the trigger. But this is not a question of a few defective guns; it’s a design weakness that could affect any of the millions of guns with this trigger. If you haven’t had a problem, it’s because nothing has worked its way into your trigger.

    Yet.

    "This only happens on dirty or neglected guns."

    This is more likely to happen on a dirty or neglected gun. However, a grass seed or a bit of pine needle could make this happen on an otherwise pristine gun.

    "There wouldn't be any problem if they followed The Rules of Gun Safety."

    True enough. You should always treat your gun as though it could go off at any moment. That doesn't excuse making a rifle that actually does it.

    ----------------------------------------

    So if you want to eliminate the problem from your friend's rifle, replace the entire Walker trigger with a Rifle Basix / Timney / Dayton Traister trigger.