Remington 700 pencil barrel

Discussion in 'Range Report' started by Kenneth66, Jan 30, 2016.

  1. Kenneth66

    Kenneth66 New Member

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    Bought this rifle a few years ago , it is in good shape , according to the previous owner he bought new sometime in the early 80's I think is what he said . Claims less than two boxes through the barrel , and it looks it , gun is in mint condition . Only hunted with it twice , killed a deer and never shot it again .
    It had a 3-9 tasco on it when I bought it , replaced with a Nikon 3-9 long range ballistic plex recticle I had laying around .
    It shot 180 gr. SGK plenty good enough to hunt with , if I remember right it was around a 1.5" hand loads and around two or so with factory .
    So I thought WTH , I'll get it worked on and see if it shoots any better . So I had lugs lapped , action bedded , barrel floated and trigger worked down close to a pound .
    I knew there probally wasn't a lot to be gained with the pencil barrel , but just thought I would see how it reacted to a floated barrel . Some of these pencil barrels shoot better with a pressure point .
    Had eight pieces of primed Remington brass laying around so I loaded four with 165 gr SGK OVER 52 gr of IMR 4350 tight to the lands for a starting point .
    Another four of the same charge 4 thousandths off the lands .
    Fired two 180 gr corelokts I had laying around for foulers . About two minutes between shots so as not to heat the barrel up .
    Then shot four of the first loads at two minute intervals , temperatures in mid forties and 10 mph wind in my face . Got a 1 3/4" group . Second load put three into about. 3/4" group with number four opening it up too 1 1/4" . Fourth shot could have been me , light guns are tough to hold .
    Any way seems I got a good starting point , now I'll load up about fifteen and shoot five three shot groups and see what I come up with .
    If your wondering why I didn't go with the 180's , I got a lot more 165's than I do 180's.
    One of those days when you need something to do , busting a few caps with a pile of snow outside beats setting in the house .
    Kenneth
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2016
  2. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    some people assume that rifles with thinner sporter type barrels are less accurate than rifles with huge varmint type barrels and just ain't necessarily true.

    a larger varmint style barrel has the ability to withstand being able to take more shots before it heats up to the point where the shot groups open up. and if a person takes their time between shots, even a sporter barreled rifle can be just as accurate. I have seen it too many times.

    what defines the accuracy of a barrel is the quality of it's rifling, not the diameter of the barrel. and a longer barrel is not always necessarily more accurate than the same rifle with a shorter barrel. because then you start getting into barrel harmonics and barrel whip. a heavier barrel that is longer can withstand those harmonics a little better than the sporter barrel many times.

    bedding the action, or pillar bedding it can usually aid in helping accuracy. floating the barrel, well in my opinion, each and every rifle responds to that differently. some like them with a free-floated barrel and some like a pressure point to aid in accuracy.

    one of the things I have done in the past with a rifle I really liked, but just couldn't get to shoot as accurately as I wanted was to rebarrel it. barrel makers usually only do barrels and they tend to do a much better job than the factory built rifles.

    another area you can look at is trying different brands of bullets and different powders. I have some rifles that group very accurately with just about any combination of bullets and powders and some that are very finicky with what they like to be accurate.
     

  3. Kenneth66

    Kenneth66 New Member

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    Thanks for the reply . When I originally bought the gun I was going to have it rebareled , but the smith pointed out it had a really pretty stock and 1.5"-2" groups were plenty accurate for deer hunting and he is right . It's not what I would call a normal sported barrel , it's pretty skinny but I think that was pretty decent accuracy for a light weight gun . What I have now is just a starting point . If the next range session produces similar groups as the second load , I probably will finish dialing it in and leave it there .
    Another session with more groups will tell the story , plus I will be able to wait several minutes between shots for cold barrel grouping .
    Thanks , Kenneth
     
  4. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    well one place they can save a lot of weight for a lightweight hunting rifle is the barrel contour and length. and other than load development most people aren't going to be shooting string after string of shots while hunting. once a person has a couple of great loads worked up that satisfy their requirements, most of them aren't shot very much. so the shorter and lighter weight barrel aren't an issue in regards to accuracy.

    and many of those lightweight hunting rifles appeal to people who hunt mountains and such where they are carrying that rifle all day long. downside to many of them depending upon what cartridge they are chambered in is the recoil issue. not usually fun for long range sessions firing lots of rounds. weight is your friend in regards to recoil in a rifle. one of my 308 bolt action's weighs in at over 16 lbs. and has recoil like a 22lr!
     
  5. Dobbie

    Dobbie New Member

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    A good friend of mine has a 700 BDL with the sporter weight barrel he bought in the 1980s in 270 Winchester-claimed it would not group 130 grain bullets worth a darn, and was buying some custom 140 grain loads which did. Sorta scratched my head as the 130 is considered a bread and butter load for that caliber. Got it over to my house and ran my Stony Point OAL gauge on a 130 grain Hornady soft point. Sure enough, the free bore was pretty far out there, and I ended up seating the bullet .050 inch off the lands. The other problem was the stock was touching the barrel in a few places. Since he wanted to go synthetic, he bought a Bell&Carlson Medalist stock and we torqued the action in. The difference is night and day. Now that the barrel is freefloated and the bullet is closer to the lands, he is sub MOA out to at least 200 yards which is all the distance we had to work with at the time. We figured out that seating the bullets out to magazine length really did more for it than anything. The loaded rounds look sorta strange with the cannelure way out in front of the case mouth, but it works very well.