Remington 550-1

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing Forum' started by tws3b2, Sep 16, 2020.

  1. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

    13,576
    2,309
    113
    Brake cleaner has its place.
    But not on guns.

    Should someone need to work with heat on a part cleaned with brake cleaner, some toxic fumes are released. Even years later.

    I prefer Gun Scrubber or Carb cleaner. Yeah, some elbow grease is required, but it is safer.
     
  2. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

    11,776
    3,980
    113
    Use crc non chlorinated brake cleaner in the green can, not the red. The red can works a little better with lots more fumes, but the residue left behind can emit phosphene gas when heated.
     

  3. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

    11,494
    9,553
    113
    tws

    If you are very careful you may be able to straighten out the Spring using caution not to stretch it or mash it. Use a large punch that will go down in the Spring and feed it into the coils and see if it will conform and stay? Of course if you can fine a new Spring that would be better. You may want to wait a while to see if a new Spring can be located before you attempt the Screw installation mentioned below. I have been looking for you also. And someone here maybe able to find Sprinbg for you somewhere? As far as the Screw Hole and Screw. Since it of special design for the gun I have not been able to locate one of those either.
    But with my Tung in my Cheek! if worse comes to worse is it tight enough you could very carefully us "RED Thread Locker sparingly so it does non go down into the Action and gets on any other parts. Take a Q Tip and paint it sparingly around the outside edge of the Screw and then insert it as snug as you can, being careful not to attempt to tighten it too much. Then giving the Red enough time to totally cure and dry. At that point I believe the Screw should hold. Because it take heat at 500 degrees to break the Red Thread Lockers Seal. Since that is a special Screw with a function section on the Tip. Therefore it would be impossible to find a Larger Diameter Screw so you could re-tap the Receiver. Even finding an original replacement Screw will not do much to solve the matter since the Threads in the Receiver are also striped and a messed. Be sure to assemble everything necessary before installing the Screw with the Thread Locker on it. Because as mentioned once it is sets up it is set!;) So be sure everything works properly regarding that part of the rifle function before it does. Since it will take a while for it to totally cure and set!
    IMO since the rifle is as old as it is. I could not see you ever having to remove the Screw again.
    Just some thoughts that might salvage an old abused Rifle.
    I would like to kick Jack the Hacks Arsssss!:p

    03

    03
     
  4. tws3b2

    tws3b2 Member

    40
    30
    18
    Wish I could. The screw goes all the way through. The screw is actually the sear spring case. It's hollow on one end and holds one end of the sear spring. You can see it on the right in photo.
     
  5. G66enigma

    G66enigma Well-Known Member Supporter

    2,210
    3,064
    113
    That screw holds the spring, but doesn't appear long enough to attach to any internals beyond that. If so ...

    How about a local machine shop, re-crafting a billet replacement screw out of tough steel, but with a wider end and newly-tapped threads on the receiver? Short of a new receiver, that might be the only way. Same screw size and shape, but with an overall larger thread-end.
     
  6. tws3b2

    tws3b2 Member

    40
    30
    18
    I found the sear spring and sear spring case at Popperts Gunsmithing on line. The spring was $1 and the case was $10. If they are in good shape that's a steal compared to Numrich and others.
     
    towboater and primer1 like this.
  7. tws3b2

    tws3b2 Member

    40
    30
    18
    No, it does not attach to anything. All it does is hold the spring. I found a new case and spring. When I get it I may take it to a gunsmith or machine shop and see what can be done.
    I appreciate all the help from everyone.
     
  8. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

    25,778
    16,100
    113
    Good luck- those are fun little rifles, and shoot surprisingly well. Had one, was given another, and bought a 3rd one for $40 as a trade-in. The floating chamber may require cleaning now and then. To clean the receiver, I strip out the bolt, and dunk the whole thing in a can of mineral spirits, let soak for an hour, swish it around a bit, shake it off, blow it out with compressed air. That is one of those rifles that warns you not to take that "screw" out.

    The 550-1 is about the only semi-auto I have seen that will shoot the CCI CB Long semi auto. No suppressor needed, just pap-pap-pap-pap.
     
  9. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

    11,494
    9,553
    113
    tws
    I know it would be a task. But can you take it somewhere to have some surface added to the outside of the Screw close enough to the holes tolerance to use the Thread Locker or maybe Silver Solder it in place. It might not be good looking but hate to see a gun out of commission. If it would function and shoot well that would be good. Obviously any value regarding it is gone in the first place.
    I hate to say it but even liquid steel in the right amount around the Screw might work!:eek:
    The main problem with the Rifle is we are dealing with stripped threads, on not one but both parts. And of course the Spring issue. If it were only one part with bad threads there are a lot of possibilities. Wish we could help you more!

    03
     
  10. G66enigma

    G66enigma Well-Known Member Supporter

    2,210
    3,064
    113
    Ah.

    Perhaps, then, a new screw that's shaped roughly like a "coin" battery, something deep enough to fill that hole, with a screwdriver indentation on the outside and the depression/holder area for the spring on the inside. Sized right, with a re-threaded receiver, it might be relatively inexpensive to "go simple" with that part. Doesn't look like it needs to do much on the inside.

    I'm sure a competent shop looking for a minor machining task could accomplish it.

    Good luck.
     
  11. jigs-n-fixture

    jigs-n-fixture Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

    3,394
    4,189
    113
    This is a shooter, and not a safe queen. A good machinist or smith, could just install a threaded insert into the receiver to accept the stock screw. Or just install a threaded rod with red loctite and then drill and tap the rod.

    There are good and elegant solutions but they may exceed the value of the rifle. You will have to determine whether it is worth doing for you.
     
    PeeJay1313 likes this.
  12. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

    11,161
    10,397
    113
    There are solutions and good solutions. It looks to me like a larger hole, a threaded bushing, and your favorite epoxy to make the bushing permanent and leaving the bolt free to remove later if necessary. The threads on the bolt didn't look to buggered to fix.

    To make the bushing would require a skilled machinist and they don't come cheap. If that was too expensive to do, I would part the gun out on ebay and start afresh. All the pawn/gun shops in the world are full of .22 rifles. I believe that you could sell dog turds of ebay if you take good pics and write a creative description; gun part would be a whiz.
     
  13. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

    11,776
    3,980
    113
    Or, tws can put in the $11 replacement parts.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2020
    tws3b2 and c3shooter like this.
  14. tws3b2

    tws3b2 Member

    40
    30
    18
    Got a new sear spring and sear spring case today. Numrich wanted $4.25 for the spring and $27.25 for the case. Jack First wanted $4 for the spring and $15 for the case. Popperts $1 for the spring and $10 for the case. All used and all the same. Numrich and Jack First may be bigger and carry more parts but dang $27.25 vs $10. And $4.25. vs $1. I'll stick with Popperts when I can. I did have to go to Numrich for the carrier / cartridge stop assembly. They were the only place to have it. Anyway I can start working on my gun this weekend.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2020
  15. tws3b2

    tws3b2 Member

    40
    30
    18
    Finally finished my 550-1. I got a sear spring case and spring from Popperts gun parts. I found a factory new carrier assembly at Numrich. Everything was great. Until, The first attempt to get the spring in place. The spring shot out of the gun into the air and down into the corner pocket of the pool table. Never to be seen again. Two days of looking all through the table. I don't know where it got to. Another two weeks of waiting on another.
    Watched several videos on u tube on how to disassemble/reassemble the 550-1. B S. None of those videos helped at all.
    The threads on my spring case hole were stripped out pretty bad as you can see in the photo but the threads on the spring case were in very good shape. I didn't think it would but the case tightened down really good.
    Took the gun to the range today. Worked Perfect.
     
    c3shooter likes this.
  16. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

    25,778
    16,100
    113
    Pictures! We need pitchers!!!
     
  17. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

    11,776
    3,980
    113
    Did you call it in the corner pocket?
     
  18. tws3b2

    tws3b2 Member

    40
    30
    18
    View attachment 229360
    Ok, here are a couple pictures.
    In the photo are the moving parts of the 550-1.
    On the right side is the carrier, cartridge stop and sear assembly. All held in place in the receiver with one pin.
    On the left is the trigger that is held in place with two pins. The trigger connects with the sear, center.
    In the other photo is the receiver. The hole with the stripped out threads is for the sear spring case. Right. The sear spring case is hollow on the end. It holds one end of the sear spring. The sear spring pushes up on the sear to lock firing pin in the fire position. Pull the trigger and it pushes the sear down to release the spring loaded firing pin. Release the trigger and the sear spring pushes the sear back up to lock the firing pin again.
    In the photo of the receiver you can see a "lip" cut into the end of the sear spring case. Circled. In the other photo you see where a " tip " has been cut into the sear, circled. When properly installed that " tip " will hang on that "lip" of the spring case . Keeping the sear from being pushed too far up.
    I've read many times of people stripping out the threads trying to install the spring case. There are just a few threads and you have to force the spring down while trying to start the threads. At same time you have to hold the sear all the way down against the bottom of the receiver. Easy to cross thread and strip.
    My threads were already mostly stripped. I found a sear spring case at Popperts with excellent threads. All I could do was hope.
    I found that a peace of 1/2 inch copper pipe was near the perfect size to fit inside the receiver and hold the sear down against the bottom. That left me with both hands to be able to force the spring down and get the case screwed into the receiver. And it worked. To my surprise it screwed down tight and going to hold fine. At the range it all worked great. Now a proud owner of a 1953 Remington 550-1 "Shooting again" rifle. 20200917_161026_resized~2.jpg Screenshot_20201028-095054~2.png
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Oct 28, 2020
    primer1 likes this.
  19. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

    25,778
    16,100
    113
    Very nice! Those are surprisingly accurate little .22s- and mine will run semi-auto with CCI CB Longs- pap pap pap pap! Folks like at me with a puzzled look "Where's the suppressor?"