Rem 742 conversion to pump

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by blucoondawg, Nov 28, 2014.

  1. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg New Member

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    Has anyone done the conversion to turn a malfunctioning 742 from a semi auto to a pump? There's a gunsmith in Minnesota who does it for about 230 bucks. Thinking about doing it with my late father's gun to make it trustworthy again for deer hunting.
     
  2. hiwall

    hiwall Active Member

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    You do know that when you are done you would end with a $250 (or less) gun? I understand in your case it likely has some sentimental value.
     

  3. Mercator

    Mercator New Member

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    He is right. Remington sells new pumps for not a whole lot more. Centerfire AND rimfire now.
     
  4. Apex-Predator

    Apex-Predator New Member

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    I made a 742 reliable again, but not by turning it into a pump but by working up a 180gr RN handload (56gr Ramshot Hunter). Went from jamming all the time to 100% perfect reliability, we use it all the time.
     
  5. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    The only thing reliable I have seen about any Woodsmaster is the first shot. They will go bang the first time. After that it is pot luck. I wouldn't invest more money in a 742. They are accurate rifles. I never worried if a 742 would jam. I took my time and made the first shot count. My first semi auto centerfire rifle was a 742. I learned what buy once cry once meant. I sold it at a loss and got a Browning. I haven't cried since I started shooting Brownings.
     
  6. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    I have never had a problem out of my 742. I wish I could get the bolt out to make cleaning easier but that's it. I know they have a bad reputation and I'm sure there are some bad ones out there but I have never had a single issue out of mine. And I know several people that have hunted with them for years without ever having a problem.

    As for the conversion I wouldn't do it. I would put it in the closet and go get a new pump or whatever else you wanted. If the gun isn't doing right then there is no reason to keep putting money in it. I also have to wonder why that gun smith can't get it to shoot reliably in semi auto? I know that it can be done because there are too many reliable 742's out there. :)
     
  7. Hookeye

    Hookeye Active Member

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    Bolt rail chew of the receiver is common in .30-06, esp for those shooting 180 and 200 gr stuff.
    Neglect of the chamber is also common.

    As for new pump .22's costing around $250.......evidently you fell asleep under a rock, as the 572's are ridiculously priced. Neat guns, but IMHO not worth what they're asking.

    Can't get new parts for 742, and welding up receiver rails and then machining aint exactly cheap.

    By going pump action the overtravel/rotation of the small lugs is stopped. 7400 run bigger and less number of lugs.

    I've had three 742's and two of them were minty inside. One would warp the bbl after first shot, put the next few into a nice group at 100 yards...................7 inches or so lower than the cold bore first.

    The old wives tale of see through rings, for second shots..........has a grain of truth to it. As the front sight moves with bbl heat up, line of sight follows.

    With a scope, when the bbl heats up...........it doesn't track the movement.

    So.............some rubes with see through rings might have been onto something, but I think most were simply clueless. I still see people using them, and unless of freakish build...........they're utter BS.

    So, some 742s shoot good, some don't. A beat to crap exterior one I had shot great, and didn't warp. I sold it to a large gentleman who promptly told me it jammed on him, repeatedly. He brought the remaining ammo I sold with the gun, to the range and I loaded it up and went Bang Bang Bang.

    I aint fat.

    Limp wristing a pistol? How bat fat fudging a rifle!

    So.........with a bulky coat, I suspect others have had comparable issues........incorrectly putting the blame on the gun.

    Got no prob with a 742, running 150's...........should it prove not to wander with heat up. I'd be sure to pull the trigger group and check for rail damage first. Some nice looking guns have proven to be torn up inside, and beaters on the outside like new within.

    Best bet...........get a 7600. Had one, cus still has his. He says it beats on him. I think it a p*ssycat.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2014
  8. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg New Member

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    You all seem to be missing the entire point of this thread. I am not looking for a lecture on 742 reliability, I am asking if any have done the conversion which this smith claims to have done many and not have had one come back. I know the issues of the 742 and what causes them. I also already own a 7600.

    The issue with the 742 is not chewed up rails it is the chamber has some rust which will grab the spent shell and cause the extractor to tear through the case head. This smith claims that shouldn't happen with the pump conversion as the action is worked manually after the pressure has already left the chamber completely whereas the auto loader is attempting to cycle as the brass still has a certain amount of pressure on it causing it to catch on the defect in the chamber.

    I don't care about any opinions on why or why not to spend the money on the gun, it was my dad's gun and I would rather have a gun that will cycle reliably than a wall hanger, it was always a good shooter accuracy wise and would be fun to actually be able to take out hunting. 230 bucks for a repair of a family gun is worth it as far as I am concerned as opposed to buying another gun, which I really don't need or want, no room to store the ones I have now or time to shoot them all.

    I probably won't do it anyways because from what I have found out so far they replace the forend which I understand is necessary as the auto has a longer forend than the pump model but my dad's gun is the bdl with the monte carlo stock and basket weave square forend, looks like they use the plain round forend, so I will probably just leave it as is and enjoy looking at a pretty gun.
     
  9. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    Why not just put a new barrel on it if the only problem is the chamber and you want to keep it for sentimental reasons? :)
     
  10. Hookeye

    Hookeye Active Member

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    Tluker, How dare you come onto a forum and start making sense! ;)

    As for pump conversion with square/basketweave forend............I'd shop for a replacement of that type and try to modify it. If you figure it out, then maybe mod the original.

    The round forend may be simply ergonomics, and if of one type, a general pc to work across various checkering styles.

    Do think the old BDL stuff to be cool, just for a time period's sake.

    A worthy project for sure :)

    I have also read of folks making the rifles straight pull manual rigs.....just killing the gas system.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2014
  11. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    If the chamber is pitted it makes no difference if it is a pump or semi auto. When the shell goes off the brass is going to form itself to the chamber, including the pits.

    You might be able to get away with shooting steel cased ammo in the gun as is. Steel case is not as accurate as brass case ammo but you will not have to carry a rod with you to get the case out of the chamber. I would try Wolf Polyperformance or silver bear. I would stay away from brown bear.

    We are not trying to steer you wrong. We just do not want to see you waste your money. If you are determined to fix the gun fix the problem. Get a new barrel for the gun.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2014
  12. buckhuntr

    buckhuntr Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    My wife likes my (hers now?) 742 - yesterday's deer was her second with it. I've had it since 1978, and it works just fine. As did Dad's, and half his hunting club's.
     
  13. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Any decent gunsmith can polish the chamber for $30 or less.

    and here I am referring to a for real gunsmith with a properly equipped shop, not some shade tree bubba.
     
  14. Hookeye

    Hookeye Active Member

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    I had a 700 in .300 winmag with a burr in the chamber. I polished it myself, but had access to good materials ;)
     
  15. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg New Member

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    Wish I could find one around here, my dad tried to find a guy to do that for a few years before he finally stopped using the gun and nobody would do it. We don't have much for actual smiths around these parts nowadays.
     
  16. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg New Member

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    They do work good until the rails get damaged or the chamber rusts, then they have these issues everyone speaks of.
     
  17. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg New Member

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    The gun will shoot some as it is before jamming, if I polish the hell out of my brass and give the chamber a good cleaning it will shoot maybe 5, 6, 7, 8 shots before sticking a case. The smith has done this to many guns with chamber issues and doesn't have the problem. I won't bother with steel case ammo I just won't use the gun.

    I understand you aren't trying to steer me wrong, but as seems to usually be the case on these forums, someone asks a specific question and rather than answering it people come out of the woodwork with their opinions and their advice, which not be sound like an a$$ but I was not born yesterday nor am I new to firearms in general, I already know most everything there is to know about these particular rifles I don't need an online class about the pros and cons of them, I simply wanted to know if anyone has done this specific modification and how it worked out in the end. I didn't really figure anyone would have done it because as everyone points out it is a lot of money to lay out for what the final product is. It is simply something to turn a wall hanger useful again. I am probably going to leave it a wall hanger unless I can find someone to work on the chamber.
     
  18. Hookeye

    Hookeye Active Member

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    Working around the problem seems rather silly if it can actually be fixed.

    Of course, what some people do to "polish" stuff and what others do, might be drastically different.
    And why I edited my post.

    I could do it in 15 mins if not terribly pitted. But I go slow, and also don't have a bore scope.
    A good smith could check and see what is going on and tell you if a polish would help or it needs re barreled.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2014
  19. Hookeye

    Hookeye Active Member

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    My .300 winmag had a burr in the chamber, gunsmith of some reputation said he could fix it for $35 and would use 600 grit.

    I declined.

    Did it myself with much finer stuff, crept up on it....maybe too fine......took a while (but I didn't screw it up). End result was smooth case removal after firing, 1st same as 40th.
     
  20. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg New Member

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    What do you actually use to polish a chamber? I'd assume one would have to remove the barrel to be able to work it decent.