reloading?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by kymike, Nov 8, 2012.

  1. kymike

    kymike New Member

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    Can I reload factory ammo? I have been keeping the spent casings from my rifle.
     
  2. AsSeenOnTV

    AsSeenOnTV New Member

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    Yes, as long as its not eastwern block Berdan primered 7.62 x 39 casings, etc (steel case)
     

  3. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    you bought, and shot ammo.
    saved the casings.
    you are on the right track!

    nickel plated, steel, and berdan primed are not reloadable.

    brass is. any centerfire caliber.

    if you dont have the equipment. the start up cost can be a bit scary. but afer a year or two of shooting it evens out with what you save, and also can improve accuracy.

    also a good way to be able to keep shooting when stores run out of ammo.
     
  4. AsSeenOnTV

    AsSeenOnTV New Member

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    The silver nickel (zinc) plated brass is reload-able, but will crack around the neck faster and wont give you as much reloadings as a regular brass casing will. But they are reload-able. They just dont 'stretch' as good as regular brass.
     
  5. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    99% of cases domestically marked are reloadable. If the head stamp is Federal (FC), Remington (RP), Winchester (WC or WCC), Speer (SP), Hornaday are good to go. Look down the mouth at the flash hole. One flash hole = Boxer primed (Reloadable). Two flash holes = Berdan primed (Not Reloadable).
     
  6. KG7IL

    KG7IL Active Member

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    Nickel Plate is fine for reloading. Make sure they are clean and lightly lubed, and you will have no problems.


    Keep saving those empties ! Even if you don't have a caliber, pick up the brass.
     
  7. kymike

    kymike New Member

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    Thanks so much for all the info. Ill just keep saving till I can start to reload
     
  8. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    FYI, we have a brass trader thread.. if you think you have too much you can post to "trade" some brass for something useful...


    http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f30/brass-trader-49001/
     
  9. steve4102

    steve4102 New Member

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    NO! You cannot reload factory ammo. Only the factory can load factory ammo.
     
  10. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    handloads are typically much higher quality consistancy wise than factory ammo.
     
  11. AsSeenOnTV

    AsSeenOnTV New Member

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    .......if you keep them in the same lot numbers. If you reload and then mix all your brass together, the consistency in accuracy kinda falls off.
     
  12. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Huh? Have you actually reloaded ammo? With a little case prep like uniforming the primer pockets and deburring the flash holes you can exceed the accuracy of factory ammo quite easily. "Lot" numbers have little or nothing to do with it. If you use one brand of brass you will have excellent accuracy potential.
     
  13. tri70

    tri70 New Member

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    Bench rest shooters will weigh the brass, trim the necks inside and out, check volume capacity, ect. I hunt with low end rifles, bolts and mini 14, I trim to size, load by book loads, test bullet performance redneck style, look for stuff on sale.
     
  14. Shade

    Shade New Member

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    Boxer primed brass casing can be reloaded.
     
  15. Shade

    Shade New Member

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    JJ,

    Nickle plated brass can be reloaded.
     
  16. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Go over to Amazon or Alibris website- look for a copy of The ABCs of Reloading. Fairly cheap book. Should be the first thing you buy for reloading. Once you have read the book, THEN you can shop for equipment. Suggest a single stage press for starters. You can also shop on line auctions for used reloading dies. Will cut the price sharply.
     
  17. cottontop

    cottontop Guest

    I agree with C3, but will add: find an RCBS Rockchucker press on the bay. I got mine for less than half of what they cost new. Nothing wrong with buying a used quality press. They never wear out and will last forever. You will not be disappointed with the Rockchucker. You can perform any reloading task you can dream up on it. I form brass from other brass with it. Some single stage presses just don't have the camming action to do it.
    cotton top
     
  18. gunnut07

    gunnut07 New Member

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    For my bench guns I group all my cases by .1 gr incraments (Buying Laupa brass helps me in this). I also will buy primers by the 10k and call my order in to make sure I can get that many in the same lot. Never had a problem. I have my dies cut by the rifle's smith from barrel stock with the exact same tools used to cut my chamber. I use a $370 Harrell Culver powder measure and Load one at a time on my arbor press. I also buy custom bullets by small time makers I also weigh each powder charge 2 times on 2 different scales. My reloading bench has a granite top because it is less prone to environmental conditions, my reloading bench is supported by 8x8 legs and the framing is all 2x10 construction and it is bolted to my 12" concrete floor and I check level of the bench every time I load on it. I have one press I use to load plinking and varmint hunting ammo and it is mounted with 3/4" hardened steel plate custom designed and built press stand. I don't use digital scales and I lock the door when I load for my bench guns. I trim meplats and spend hours on case prep trimming, turning case necks, measuring, and annealing with my Ballistic edge case annealing machine. I also spend plenty of time checking case run out bullet run out OAL and I take notes on everything when shooting. I record wind speed direction, humidity, temp, cloud cover sun position, time of day, time of year, and in many cases the tide as well. I try to remove all variables from my bench loads except for me the shooter. I don't drink any caffeine with in 3 days of a shoot I only eat specific food the day of a match I make sure and only drink water and make sure I am well hydrated. That is nothing, I know some crazy cookie bunch rest shooters. We tend to be an odd bunch. .01" increase in group size warrants a new barrel. I have many times only loaded brass 1 time then tossed it because I didn't like the way it performed.

    Shoot I tried turning my own cases out of brass bar stock and forming them myself once. Took too long and didn't yield the results I was looking for.
     
  19. AsSeenOnTV

    AsSeenOnTV New Member

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    .................
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2012
  20. gunnut07

    gunnut07 New Member

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    Been reloading a LONG dang time. Does it make a difference in some of my guns sure when you are talking about a $5k custom built bench rifle that has a tight chamber and a tight neck that requires turning. Sure it does.

    For a factory deer rifle that is cranked out by the millions from Remington, Savage, Hoaw, Ect.... no not really. They have more tolerance built into them.

    I'm with robo on this one. Plus if you are talking about pistol ammo. Please I get great accuracy out of my 45acp reloads I crank out by the thousand with a Dillon 1050. I reload 2k 45acps at a time by just yanking the lever on that sucker for a little over an hour. I use what ever brass I can pick up from the range. I have shoot everything from federal to starline to stuff I don't even know the name of in my 1911 and it feeds shoots and acts fine.