reloading

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by remington7mm, Jan 25, 2011.

  1. remington7mm

    remington7mm New Member

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    im thinking about getting into reloading. sounds alittle complicated for a newbie, but is it worth it in the long run? what else do i need other that the press, dies, brass, primers and tips to get started? im starting to collect all my brass i have shot already incase i start to reload and have around 500 empty cases already, and will continue to keep them cause if i dont reload ill just scrap themonce i have enough. can someone get me a couple list of things i will need to start reloading, and a good press to start with.
     
  2. Squirrel_Slayer

    Squirrel_Slayer New Member

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    Start off with a reloading manual, and don't forget you will need powder as well. Yes, it's worth it. You can make accurate rounds tailored to your firearm and you will save money in the long run.
     

  3. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    #1 Buy at least one good manual (Lyman, Sierra, Hornaday, RCBS, etc) and read it cover to cover. The manuals are REQUIRED READING!!!! There will be a test...when you shoot your first round. If you hit the target and do not blow yourself or your gun up, you have passed the test. This is an ongoing testing regimen. Each round you put down range is a new test. The quest for a perfect score is a lifelong endeavor.
     
  4. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger Active Member

    Everything those above me said, plus it's a heckuva fun hobby.
     
  5. Squirrel_Slayer

    Squirrel_Slayer New Member

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    Just be careful, collecting brass on trips to the range can become a disease. Oh yeah, you will need a tumbler too.
     
  6. Davyboy

    Davyboy New Member

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    Reloading has to be taken very seriously
     

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  7. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    buzz buckets/tumblers/vibrators are not mandatory, especially for those reloading practice rounds.

    I loaded 10mm for a year or two before i got my bucket.

    Bullets
    brass
    primers
    powder
    calipers
    tumbler
    manual
    powderscale
    press
    dies
    notebook.
     
  8. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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  9. amoroque

    amoroque New Member

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    I agree with the posts above, get yourself a good reloading manual. I personally like the Sierra and Hornady ones. Read them and re-read them until you dont feel that reloading is complicated and then you are ready to buy the equipment, materials and give it a go.

    Good luck.

    remember........alcohol and/or drugs and reloading do NOT mix. Its really easy to be hanging in your basement or garage reloading and have the urge to crack a cold one........reloading is something you need your 100% concentration on. All it takes is one double charge to injure or kill yourself or others.
     
  10. Squirrel_Slayer

    Squirrel_Slayer New Member

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    A friend of mine once loaded 200 rounds of .223 about 5 grains of powder hot. The only five rounds of that ammo he put through his rifle were producing 3 foot flames out the front of the flash hider. He now has 195 rounds of junk ammo sitting in his reloading room waiting to have all of those bullets pulled.
     
  11. remington7mm

    remington7mm New Member

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    Seems like I should get the Manuel like a lot of you suggested, I also have all the time in the world during the day when no one is home to bother me, turn the radio on and go to town.were would I get this book from sporting goods store. Im just thinking about it cause I might shoot once a week in the summer or 1 time a month. I also have a couple pistols so it would really benefit. Plus if I get good o can resale some rounds and make a couple bucks.
     
  12. stick_man

    stick_man New Member

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    Careful there. Don't go putting the cart before the horse. When you start talking about selling your rounds, you are opening up a whole nuther bucket of worms... FFL, insurance, insurance, FFL... (did I mention you would need an FFL and a lot of liability insurance?)

    Work on learning all you can about reloading FIRST, before you even attempt to load your first round. Learn it inside and out. Do not allow any distractions while you load. Your life may depend on it. As said in other posts, a double charge (really easy to do with fast burning pistol powders) can be extremely dangerous to your gun and your face and your hands and to anybody in the close proximity.

    My recommendation would be to find somebody near you that reloads that can act as a mentor and teach you about reloading practices and getting your equipment set up properly. Then, after many sessions with him, have him observe you while you load your first rounds.

    Remember to go by what the books say, not what you read on the 'net. Use the same brand and style of components used in the reloading manual. Follow the instructions to the T.

    In a very short time, you will be producing very good ammunition. If you pay attention to what you are doing, you will be producing very safe ammo as well and will often times be able to match or beat the performance of factory ammo.

    One last bit of caution. YOU WILL BECOME ADDICTED! Reloading is a very rewarding hobby. You will not save money by reloading. Your costs per shot will go down, but you will simply end up shooting a lot more.

    Have fun, be safe, and may your shots ring true.
     
  13. rifleman55

    rifleman55 New Member

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    It's not hard, the main thing is to take your time, double check everything and stay away from max loads, if you look at the reloading manuels, usually very little FPS is gained from mid loads to full loads and full loads are usually not as accurite.

    Two must get books, "The ABC's Of Reloading" and the Lee reloading manuel, just don't buy lee equipment.
    Dillon, RCBS, Hornady, Redding, but don't buy cheap loading equipment. Good equipment will not only turn out better loads, but will last a lifetime if taken care of. The only thing to get from lee is if you need to crimp your rifle loads, get the "Factory Crimp Die" for whatever caliber you are loading, they are great. Start out with a single stage.

    John K
     
  14. remington7mm

    remington7mm New Member

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    thanks aton guys, its still an idea thats up in the air that my dad mentioned to me. i have still been ammo shopping and it seems that i can get the same amount of factory rounds from a company that i can get reloads from the run show. im going to prolly pick up a manuel soon to start reading but for the most part finding and getting everything is a whole nother world it sounds like.

    does anyone know were i can get discounted brass and primers ate, such as a whole sale dealer online or along though's lines or is the brass pretty much one price?
     
  15. remington7mm

    remington7mm New Member

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    just did some quick shopping online and it seems that i can reload 1000rnds for 300 bucks. buying 1000rnds at the store 404 dallors. seems like if i can save alot if i do alot of shooting in a year. it wont seem like it cause i only bought 200 rnds but i could only imagine buying 1000. hmmmm this has me thinking really harn now on what to do.
     
  16. Troy Michalik

    Troy Michalik Is it Friday yet? Supporter

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    Don't look at it strictly from a money saving standpoint. The ammunition that you make custom for YOUR firearms is worth at least double whatever you're going to save. The satisfaction and fulfillment of doing it yourself is priceless. It is a completely worthwhile hobby and one I wish I would have started when I was much younger.

    I can't add anything else that hasn't already been said by someone else here. Read, read, read (don't forget to look at the pictures) and read it again. Double double check your work. Make them one at a time to start out with. Sequester yourself from ALL distractions. Keep your work area CLEAN.

    Like Robo said, this is a test where bad grades are unacceptable!

    Keep in touch and let us know how it goes.
     
  17. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    You can get a copy of ABCs of Reloading over on Amazon for about $16 plus shipping.

    Amazon.com: Used and New: The ABCs Of Reloading: The Definitive Guide for Novice to Expert (ABC's of Reloading)

    AFTER you read the book, as much as I detest them, check on ebay for used loading dies- the thngs never wear out.

    As far as money savings- not really. But you do get to make your own the way YOU like it. I shoot a .357 that nobody loads except MAYBE Buffalo Bore. I do have one rifle that by itself justifies reloading- Winchester 71, in .348 Winchester. Factory ammo is $75/20 rounds.

    By the way, we DID mention that if you are reloading for sale, you need a FFL as a Mfgr of ammo? I do not shoot other peoples reloads or share a toothbrush with them unless we have DNA in common.
     
  18. Silvertip 44

    Silvertip 44 New Member

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    Get the manuals first. Read and then re-read them. There will be lists of those items you will need in the manuals especially Lyman's. Above all, be careful and don't deviate from the manuals listings.
    Don't reload ammo for anyone else, and don't shoot anyone else's reloads.
     
  19. Boyerracing343

    Boyerracing343 New Member Supporter

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    :eek: Holy S**T