Reloading, yea or nay?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by partdeux, Jan 24, 2012.

  1. partdeux

    partdeux Well-Known Member

    4,627
    154
    63
    Here's my problem... I have a local commercial reloader whose stuff is excellent. Paying as low as $150/1000 for 9mm JHP. i can barely buy the JHP for that little, much less primers, cases (yes I know that's essentially a one time purchase), and powder. I was looking at a Dillion 550 kit that's available for around $1,200 and thinking, this is pretty expensive with no savings.

    On a good month I'm lucky to get 1k rounds sent down range.

    What say the experts here?
     
  2. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

    4,993
    52
    48
    You will not save that much. I have a Lee 1000. It is pretty fast. But it is finicky. I have to watch it to make sure it is doing what it is supposed to.

    You can buy Berrys Plated Bullets for about .10 each. The primers will cost you about .03 each. And a powder like Titegroup will run about .01 each. So you are looking at about .14 a round.

    You are currently paying .15 a round. So you will only save about 10.00 per 1000 rounds. It would take me about 3 hours to load 1000 rounds. That is a guess. I have never loaded that many in one sitting.

    However, If you were loading something other than 9mm, or if you were making your own bullets the savings would be considerably more.

    I don't reload to save money. I reload as a hobby. It is like shooting to me.
     

  3. BlueTurf

    BlueTurf New Member

    1,038
    0
    0
    We don't all reload to save money. Many of us do it to make ammunition that will work very well in our guns. The science of reloading allows us to customize the ammunition for our particular firearm so we can enhance accuracy and performance. To many of us reloading is a hobby and like other hobbies one can spend as much time and money as they are willing and able. If shooting and saving money doing it is what you are looking for I think you found a good deal on ammo.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2012
  4. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

    2,096
    1
    0
  5. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

    4,910
    2
    38
    9 mm is actually a fairly poor cartridge to start reloading on, at least using cost savings as the sole justification. Now, if you had a specific need that couldn't be met with bulk ammo, then you have a new variable to account for. I don't shoot huge volumes and I reload for multiple calibers, so it works for me. Plus I like to tinker. I'l be the first to admit it's not always the best option for everyone.
     
  6. partdeux

    partdeux Well-Known Member

    4,627
    154
    63
    That 1,200 is Brian's complete starter kit ;)
     
  7. BlueTurf

    BlueTurf New Member

    1,038
    0
    0
    I absolutely agree with you on this. The 9mm really is not a good cartridge to start with when learning the process and science of reloading. There is not much savings to be gained from reloading this round because the target ammo is pretty cheap compared to other popular handgun calibers. I bought some 9mm dies and load this round only because I already had all of the other equipment I needed.
     
  8. tiberius10721

    tiberius10721 New Member

    499
    0
    0
    The more I reload the more I shoot so I don't really save any money but it does make shooting more affordable
     
  9. JonM

    JonM Moderator

    20,110
    19
    38
    reloading for me opens doors to cartridges there would be no way to justify shooting. things like 50AE, 458socom, 458 lott, and match grade 556, 308, 7.62x54r.

    cost savings for stuff like 9mm is minimal. what it DOES do for things like 9mm is let me use some of the same materials for other cartridges. the ammount of 45acp and 9mm my wife and i go through each month makes loading it on a progressive loader viable cost wise.

    but i just like to reload. i get more ammo for the same money. i dont save anything i just stretch my cash further and have a blast doing it.

    reloading opens doors that allows the shooter to tune a cartridge for a rifle or handgun. black hills 308 is around 25-30$ per 20. i can make better rounds for around half that which functions in my rifle better than black hills match grade.

    for hunting you get cheaper access to very very very good hunting bullets that arent mass produced. i hunt with my 458winmag. 20 rounds of 500grain hunting ammo can run 130$+. i can load it for around 15$ per 20
     
  10. mrb1982

    mrb1982 New Member

    177
    0
    0
    I actually have a buddy who has all the equipment and just lets me use it. I bought some 7mm rem mag dies, and am loading some rounds right now. I was shooting Federal Premium for approximately $52/box. I can load these for anywhere between $12-17/box(depending on if I need to buy brass or not) with better accuracy. I will pay for the dies with 20 rounds reloaded, plus, once again, a more accurate round.
     
  11. partdeux

    partdeux Well-Known Member

    4,627
    154
    63
    Strange twist today... The commercial reloader I buy most of my stuff from was complaining to my wife today that it's time for him to bring in some help, LOL Since she has the summers off from the school district... We'll see if anything comes out of this!
     
  12. DustyDawg48

    DustyDawg48 New Member

    69
    0
    0
    I probably can't add much to the discussion but I am with those that reload for a variety of reasons and the savings is a part of it. I do reload 9mm since I can then choose my own bullet weight instead of relying on somebody to carry it. I like 124 and 147 grain 9mm rounds and all I ever seem to find are 115 grain. Plus I also started loaded, and got great results from, 200 grain jacket flat nose bullets from Montana Gold Bullet in .45 ACP. Now those you can save some money on, but as others have said, it is as much about spending time learning a skill, doing something that involves your hobby and just having fun as much as it is trying to save money over factory.