Reloading:Wife says I need a hobby

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Randyman59, Jun 17, 2013.

  1. Randyman59

    Randyman59 New Member

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    Ok, Guys.

    I bought a G19 several months ago and love it. Ammo is sometimes difficult to find, but I got to thinking, when it's too nasty outside to go fishing, I could sit and reload. I started looking at getting a sub 2k carbine in 9mm just so I could keep everything one caliber.
    Ok, I can't afford the Dillon presses, so I've looked at the Lee presses.
    I've watched Youtube videos on single stage presses, and I'm not sure I want to spend that much time changing out the dies. I'm sure it would teach me patience, but then I saw video on Lee press that rotates the die to the next stage. Also, some of these presses have what looks like a ball chain from the bathtub stopper attached to the powder cask.

    Also, I keep seeing I would need books. If I only load 9mm, do I really need a book? If I buy 115gr. bullets, I only need to know how much powder to add.

    Which brings me to another question. I saw a review on the Keltec Sub 2k that says 115gr. might not have enough blow back to run the gun, but 124gr. would. Since I know nothing about reloading, I'm guessing that adding just a pinch more powder to regular 115gr shells is a no-no.

    I've read cons on the Lee Cast Aluminum Pro 1000 Reloading Kit For 9MM Luger, so y'all help me out. Set me straight, will ya?

    Thanks
     
  2. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    books you say? if you wanted to only make one sort of bomb.. or one sort of dessert.. would you not need a book or recipe? yes.. you need books... you need the ABC's of reloading... under 20 bucks on amazon.. and then at leas 1 reloading manual. most kits will come with one.

    for doing pistol ammo a lee turret press would probly be just fine. personally i use a single stage but often wish i had a turret for pistol calibers. rifles are a different story. as far as the keltec. it will shoot 115gr just fine. ive done it... ive hear you cant shoot hollow points only full metal jackets.. but that i have not tried yet.. but full metal jacket 115 gr 9mm shoots just fine.

    reloading is not something to play with. you either get series, and follow directions, or you dont and just buy ammo at ths store. up to you.. in time it will save money, and in times of need you will have ammo. but cost effective as a goal is not always the case... you have to figure in your time at the bench, and your components.

    but you came to the right place. if you need help we are here for ya.

    as far as lee goes its good quality for the price, and it will work to get you started for sure.
     

  3. Rocky7

    Rocky7 New Member

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    Reloading for me is a fascinating, absorbing fixation on finding the load that will put a string of bullets into one raggedly hole, preferably at Warp Factor 8. I hunt and have found that 1/2" accuracy or better ramps up my confidence to levels never experienced with store bought ammo. Reloading was supposed to save me money but, many years ago, when I found out it was not saving me money I stopped paying any mind to the numerous big and small widgets I have bought to feed my hobby, which now completely occupies a small room and all the walls therein.

    Get an intervention......before it's too late.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2013
  4. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    Thats where the locking ring is used. Lock it in place with the allen wrench, and it takes up the time to reconfigure it the next time. Only a minor adjustment and measurement is all that is needed. Duh! ;)
     
  5. domino300

    domino300 New Member

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    The Lee Classic Cast turret press, and a manual, Lyman 49th or get one from whatever bullet maker you prefer, Hornady, Speer etc.
     
  6. Crazycastor

    Crazycastor New Member

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    If you don't read up on reloading and how to do it and what to watch for. You could blow up your gun, your hand or injure someone near you. There's alot to understand about reloading such as the right powders, excessive pressures from too much powder. The right kind of primers. Plus you might have to trim your brass and how much to trim it. It's a whole process you have to know about. Check out utube on reloading. That'll give you some ideas. Good luck, hope it works out for you.
     
  7. fa35jsf

    fa35jsf New Member

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    I got a single stage Hornady reloading press for Christmas and have reloaded about 500 rounds of .45acp.

    I still do not have the ABC reloading book but my kit came with a great manual with all the directions and tips and tricks. I follow the powder recommendations in the manual.
     
  8. Randyman59

    Randyman59 New Member

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    Thanks,fellas. I see some videos where they actually measure the shells on a scale. Others just assume the powder is the same for each casing. I see the "book" part. The ABC's of reloading would be one to get. But, I had planned on just the 9mm round, till my dad gave me his Taurus 357 magnum. Now, I'm sure for the time being, I'll stick with loading the 9's and buy the 38's or 357 as I won't shoot it as much. I wouldn't mind the press with the dies attached and after decapping and resizing, turn the turret and do the next stage, then the next stage. Removing and replacing dies each time looks tedious. But, as you say, safety. Tumble, inspect, decap/resize, powder,seat bullet,crimp, etc....
    Again, I can use all the help I can get.Looks like the press might sit a while till I find 3 of 4 components. Appreciate you folks....
     
  9. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I would start with a single stage press if I was you. I have a Lee Pro 1000. That is the progressive you are talking about. As a new reloader I would not buy one. It is very finicky. I am always having to make adjustments to it. It is not for the inexperienced.

    When you use a single stage press you do not change dies back and forth for each round. You size and decap a bunch of rounds all at once. Then you expand all the mouths, then prime them all. I can reload a box of 50 on my RCBS single stage in about 30 minutes. One thing you can do is to spend an evening one night sizing say 500 cases. Then the next day you expand. And so on. Before you know it you have a ammo can full of 9mm. That is how I started.

    And yes...you need a book.
     
  10. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Well if reloading doesn't work out there is always Whiskey and Pole dancers.
     

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  11. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    Fellas? :confused:

    The bad thing about measuring your shells on the scale, is that you already made them, and 'sealed' them. if by now you measure them and find a problem, you have to remove the bullet, and check it out, and start out all over. By measuring carefully, and visually inspecting them as they sit in the tray after they have added powder, you wont have a problem.

    I prefer to make my own powder dippers using spent casings, a band saw and grinder, and powder scale to get the desired powder setting.

    But that takes patience, and you don't have much of that! ;) :p :)

    A+++ to what Rick just said :)
     
  12. kjdeut

    kjdeut New Member

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    I started with the Lee Classic Turret kit and have been very happy with.
    Couple of lessons learned from someone who is still new to reloading with only a thousand rounds (9mm, 38 spc, 45ACP) or so of experience.

    With the Lee turret be aware that the accuracy of the powder feeder varies with the type of powder you use.

    You want to read as much as you can to understand the mechanics and how different powder, bullet weight, overall length, etc., can make the difference between damaging your gun, yourself and or someone else. Loading is a lot more then just putting powder, casing, and bullet together and shooting it.

    I found that the estimates Lee posted on how many rounds you can make in an hour on the high side. You could maybe hit their numbers if you just flew through everything and never double checked, but I wouldn't recommend it.

    Overall I find reloading a fun hobby and a challenge to get just the right recipe that i like to shoot and is accurate. Just take your time, and learn as much as you can, it is not something you want to rush.

    Ken
     
  13. bigjim

    bigjim New Member

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    You can say that again. If you don't want to get a book to learn what should be done and WHY! Then Don't get into reloading. You will just hurt yourself.

    Jim
     
  14. Randyman59

    Randyman59 New Member

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    I will get the book. If there is anything in life that I want to get right ( besides the right woman) its reloading.
    I guess I just get confused about when I see posts about right recipes. Same caliber, same primer, same 115 gr.projectile, same powder , what recipe?
     
  15. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    when people speak of a good recipe it means they have a round that works well in a certain firearm. the lenghts of shells, and of where the bullet is seated in the shel can be vary and thus allower for ore less accuracy. you can change something as little as .010 to .014 and have a slightly different result. but this matters more once you gain a good handle on how its done. for most purupose just staying in the middle ground of load data will produce plinking ammo.

    ive been around reloading since i was a kid but still learned things from the ABC's of reloading book. i loved it. and its a really good place to start.
     
  16. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    I have used several presses and the turret press is the one that I don't use at all. I gave it away (it was a Lyman). I also have some Lee dies for my .45/70 that I am going to toss in a drawer as soon as I get some better dies from Dillon. My sons and I reload many different calibers, so we make good use of our two Dillons. Also have an RCBS Ammomaster auto progressive that is set up for .40S&W but rarely use it (probably going to sell it someday).

    What I would recommend is to get set up with a single-stage O-frame and get used to reloading that way. Eventually you can pick up some more O-frame presses and set one up for each stage if you have the room. That way you can have each die set into its own press and leave them there. It takes a bit of an investment unless you do it the way I do and scrounge all of your equipment. I have only purchased one press outright (the Dillon 550B). The rest have been given to me one way or another.

    You will find that your gun will have a preference for a certain powder, a certain weight bullet, a certain primer by a certain manufacturer. They can be very picky this way. With some of my guns the groups will open up as much as 3 or 4 inches using identical components but varying the powder charge by less than a grain of powder. Same can be said for different weight bullets (though you cannot safely use the same powder charge for different weight bullets- something you will learn from reading the books) or different powders. All of these are variables that you can figure out over time, but only with a manual and through keeping notes. Once you have determined what combination of components and what powder charges your guns "like", then you can continue to reload all day long using those components. But if one day you can't find your preferred powder then what will you do?
     
  17. Randyman59

    Randyman59 New Member

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    Thanks for the info. I want to be safe and enjoy my hobby.