Reloading Techniques, Tips & Tricks......

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Dallas53, Dec 16, 2018.

  1. Imurhuckleberry

    Imurhuckleberry Well-Known Member

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    I have a tip on cleaning 20 to 30 pieces of brasses at a time. For me when I reload 45/70 brass I like to use a sonic cleaner. what I do is put the 20 to 30 pieces inside a pickle or mason jar. I fill the jar with the cleaning solution just enough to cover the brass all the way. I than place the jar inside the sonic cleaner and than fill the sonic cleaner with water to the amount prescribed on the reservoir. By doing this I only use a small amount of the cleaner and save money by not having to fill the reservoir with the cleaning solution.
     
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  2. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    now that's a very clever tip! :D
     
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  3. Mouser

    Mouser Well-Known Member

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    A few minor things...I load in batches of 50 and check powder weight 2x per 50...I have a progressive Lee press. Check OAL in beginning, always and depending on how many rounds, maybe later.

    I don't listen to any music and when (not if) I'm interrupted, I retrace my steps before I pull on the handle...make the sub conscious, conscious.

    Sweep the floor and lay down 2x4'a under my bench...I will spill primers, cases and bullets and they always seem to roll under my work bench!

    My biggest error is not seating the primer...doesn't happen often or really anymore but I inspect finished cartridges for that and specifically make sure my pull bottoms out...again, make the sub-conscious as conscious as possible.

    Never leave powder in loader over night

    I separate brass by how many times I've loaded it...where possible. I load mainly pistol rounds for plinking so I accumulate brass of all types...don't hesitate to let other people you know that don't reload to save brass for you..many will if they know.
     
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  4. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    some very good tips Mr. Mouser.

    I think in my first post, I mentioned the inexpensive containers which would be a good way to sort brass by number of times the cases have been reloaded would be applicable here.
     
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  5. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Dallas,
    It was a little expensive but some of the best money I ever spent was on a Lyman 1200 Digital Powder Dispenser. Use to load a whole lot and the time I spent using those Normal little Balance Scales on the eyes and eating up all that time measuring out powder charges was terrible. But then I saw a Lyman 1200 Digital Dispenser. And decided to spend the money. Great Decision! It will drop any powder load in seconds and within 1/10th of a grain. And saved me literally HOURS! Every time I used it.
    Here is the specifications on the unit.
    The Lyman 1200 DPS 3 is an electronic powder scale and automatic powder dispenser combined into one convenient unit. It has the ability to store up to 100 pet loads with easy recall by cartridge, specific powder and weight. No powder calibration is required. Dispenses powder quickly with accuracy to +/- 1/10 grain. This system can be used as a scale, complete dispensing system or a scale and powder trickler. The 1200 DPS 3 is powered by an AC adapter that is included and also has the ability to interface with PC interface Software (sold separately) allowing reloaders to transfer memory directly from a personal computer to the DPS system. The interface also has an electronic reloader's log for storing valuable reloading information. Now featuring an upgraded keypad! These new keypads were added late Summer 2011.

    Technical Information:

    Capacity: 7000 Grains (1 lb)
    Voltage: 110 Volts
    Accuracy: 1/10 grain Units: Grains
    Lyman 1200 Powder Scale.jpg
     
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  6. oO_Rogue_Oo

    oO_Rogue_Oo Well-Known Member

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    Hunting ammo I load in batches of 50 to 100.
    Rifle ammo in batches of 500 to 1000.
    Pistol ammo in batches of 1000 to 2000.

    I prep my brass in stages; decapping (with universal decapping die) then tumbling (always clean brass before getting it near my dies), lubing and sizing then tumbling again to remove lube. I will then prime with a hand primer (I can do this sitting in front of the TV). I weigh every charge, no mater what I'm loading. I do charging and bullet seating as a single step. Then move on to crimping. Then I will check with case gauge (slot gauge if one is available). My press and scales are RCBS; I've modified my press with a Hornady LNL collar so that dies stay set and changing dies takes a few seconds at most.
     
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  7. hairbear1

    hairbear1 Well-Known Member

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    Reloading wise I use containers that are take away containers from the Chinese take away shops. These make good containers for fired cases before they're put into the tumbler. I always have 2 of them ready to go after tumbling so that when they're finished in the tumbler they get inspected for cracks and then thrown into the 2nd container for measurement and trimming if need be.

    After being trimmed,chamfered it's then primer pockets cleaned, cases lubed up on a case pad and then reprimed and any cases that are a loose fit primer wise get tossed.
    After this all cases are sat in a reloading block and then I charge 5 cases at a time and seat a projectile this way I don't bugger up loading a case with no powder. I also double check before I put a projectile in that there's powder in the case.......................been there done that and buggered it up before.:rolleyes:
    I've had a RCBS "O" frame Starter's kit press for the past 35+ years and it's been a real solid bit of gear.
    Another thing I do is before reloading the prepped cases I chamber the prepped cases in the rifle to make sure they chamber with no problems as I've had a few that every now and again won't let the bolt close even though the cases before them fed in and chambered no worries at all.
    Better finding out now instead of in the paddock and facing a pig that wants to ream you a new one.
     
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  8. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My friend, you need a Dillon 650! You're doing ten times as much work as you would with a Dillon.
     
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  9. Jack Ryan

    Jack Ryan Well-Known Member

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    This reminds me of a realtor showing us houses I wanted to look at one time, "But what would you do when you weren't mowing grass?"
     
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  10. Jack Ryan

    Jack Ryan Well-Known Member

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    My wife's recipe cards gave me this idea. Shower clips 50 pcs / $1 at the Dollar store. If it is a load from a manual I usually include the Book name and page number. Later as you use it a few times I make notes on performance. I'll put different marker identification on shells for different loads or batches. I can always look at a shell and go back to see if "all these the same, all those the same, loaded like this or that..."

    [​IMG]
     
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  11. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Duuuuuuude!!!!!

    Ever heard of computer spreadsheets??:eek::eek:
     
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  12. Jack Ryan

    Jack Ryan Well-Known Member

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    Yep.

    Even created them back in the day.

    Just because you are holding a hammer don't mean every thing needs hit.

    Just make your self ONE CARD with one load and stick it in the box with the dies for that load. That's all I'm suggesting. If you don't have a shower hook full of loads hanging on a deer antler 5 years from now, then bring up this thread up again and tell me, "Jack, that was the dumbest old fashion crazy idea I ever heard. I never felt like such a fool as I have since you talked me in to making this first card."

    I'll record a video response, "ALL HAIL LOCUTUST! THE PROPHET AND SEER OF ALL KNOWLEDGE!" in response if the day ever comes.
     
  13. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    LOL! ROFLMAO Funny! :p:D:p:D:p:D

    you two could be the new Abbott and Costello! :):D
     
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  14. Mouser

    Mouser Well-Known Member

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    I'm a low-tech sort of guy myself...something I learned, an invaluable lesson really...from lean manufacturing the toyota way I think..."computers move information, people do the work".
    Can't count the times people have tried to "automate" some sort of process/record keeping in the name of "making it easier" only to find it took me 2-3 times longer than just writing the stuff down in a notebook...now to send a spreadsheet to many people, computers are the real deal...but for my attendance records...just give me a three ring binder and a pen with the calendar sheets and call it good!
    Anyways, I don't use 3x5 cards, but I do keep a binder of notes and my loads are pretty generic for what I do as I'm not working up hot loads or trying to squeeze out accuracy at 600+ yards.
     
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  15. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I use both methods. when working up loads, I use the composition books I buy at the Dollar General for $1 each, and I also use the 3x5 index cards in card file box.

    when working up the loads, I write down pertinent information in the composition book, along with test firing notes. once I settle on a specific load that I really am liking that gave very good results and have fine-tuned it, I then transfer that data to 3x5 index card, into the section for a specific firearm.

    I am constantly trying new components, so the composition books are like workbooks where things are constantly being perfected to gain a specific goal for that load. I will also make notes, and target results in the books to read later and to study on, as to where to make my next changes if needed.
     
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  16. partdeux

    partdeux Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Why not?
     
  17. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I don't because I live in very humid climate, and it could absorb moisture and cause problems with it burning.
     
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  18. Jack Ryan

    Jack Ryan Well-Known Member

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    I found I like the cards even if I use something out of the Hornady manual on the shelf right next to it because like my wife working in the kitchen I can take the card for exactly just the one thing I'm working on right here, right now and have everything about it laying right on the table the whole time. If I get up, when I come back I know exactly what I'm doing and exactly what the point or goal is for what I've got out here. No flipping through the book that got closed or which one of those recipes from three pages of 30-06 was it. Did I do anything a little different? Which one of those worked well with this or that. Exactly how long OAL set that right off the lands. What was the REAL fps on that load. What was the setting / clicks that put that in the bull? It will at least put them on the paper even if it is a little different.

    If I'm shopping for components, I've got the recipe card right in front of me to see if I've got what I need on the shelves instead of when I've got a hundred cases full of powder and that wasn't the bullet I planned on using.

    It's like a computer screen, only I can put it in my pocket and take it to the gun shop. And I can change it with out getting white out all over the screen.
     
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  19. partdeux

    partdeux Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My equipment is in the basement, and even in the summer, the humidity is kept relatively low. Temperature is very consistent.
     
  20. oO_Rogue_Oo

    oO_Rogue_Oo Well-Known Member

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    Single stage keeps me home and out of trouble :)

    I've thought about a Hornady ammo plant. Since I use the Hornady LNL collars on my RockChucker, with a little tweaking I can set them up to be able to move them from press to press without adjustment. But honestly a Co-ax is higher on my list.
     
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