Reloading Techniques, Tips & Tricks......

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Dallas53, Dec 16, 2018.

  1. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member Supporter

    16,170
    17,390
    113
    how about a thread that is about reloading tips and tricks that make the process easier, or more accurate ammo, or more enjoyable because we are not spending as much time on the more tedious tasks during the reloading procedure.

    any ways of helping make things easier, faster, safer would be welcomed. and I think this would be of benefit to the noobs as well as the veteran reloader.

    some of my tips?

    keep your work area clean and organized. safer and makes things more productive while reloading.

    I shop for plastic storage bins at the Dollar stores with hinged lids. they usually can be had in various sizes and colors. so you could color code for brass needing to be cleaned, resized and de-primed, and brass ready to primed and reload. I use some 2" masking tape on the front with name of the cartridge done in permanent marker. personally, I like the ones that are stackable.

    if you buy your bullets in larger bulk quantities, you could also sort them to plastic storage bins with the information written on the container.

    when doing my media tumbling of brass, I add some generic chrome polish to the corn cob media, and the brass comes out looking almost like brand new. just a few drops is all that is needed for most of my brass. the corn cob media on it's own will clean the brass, but the chrome polish will remove any tarnish that might be present.

    so that should be a good place to start for now! lets hear your tips and tricks!
     
    Rifling82 likes this.
  2. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member Supporter

    16,170
    17,390
    113
    Rifling82 likes this.

  3. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

    21,588
    12,412
    113
    I made my reloading 100X faster and easier.

    I bought a Dillon 650!:D
     
    Jack Ryan, Rifling82 and Dallas53 like this.
  4. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member Supporter

    16,170
    17,390
    113
    good point Mr. Locutus. as that is always a good option if a person can afford the Dillon. I have heard nothing but good reviews on their products over the years. they seem to be a bit pricey, but the quality far outweighs the cost in the long run.
     
    Rifling82 and locutus like this.
  5. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

    21,588
    12,412
    113
    Ya know, my dad always told me that the most expensive item on the shelf usually ends up being the cheapest in the long run. In my 74 years, I've never had any experiences to contradict that.
     
    Jack Ryan, Shopfox and Dallas53 like this.
  6. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member Supporter

    16,170
    17,390
    113
    in most cases, yes, I would agree. my father taught us to buy quality items and to take care of them, and they would serve our needs for many years. and the thing is, many times something that is of high quality, sometimes has steeper price tag.

    one of the presses that my father gave to me years ago, because he stopped reloading, is an old RCBS Rockchucker that he bought in about 1968. fifty years old and still making ammo! I think we have gotten our money's worth from that press over the years.
     
    Oldoutlaw likes this.
  7. Greg_r

    Greg_r Well-Known Member

    980
    1,300
    93
    Buy once, cry once. Not a bad policy. You just have to make sure you are buying quality, not a gimmick.

    I have RCBS and Lyman products that are 40 to 60 years old, still going strong. The new Lyman Brass Smith line looks like it may show promise. Redding is top of the line, and I have heard that Dillon is, but I have no personal experience with then. I have a newer RCBS press and it's not near the quality of my older ones in my opinion.

    And a reloading tip. Do you like the floating shell holders and dies as found in the Forster Co-Ax and new MEC Marksman? You can make almost any press have the floating feature. Simply replace the spring clip that holds the shell holder to the ram with a rubber O ring, you can place a second one under your die lock ring. Viola, you now have a floating shell holder and die!
     
    Jack Ryan and Dallas53 like this.
  8. jigs-n-fixture

    jigs-n-fixture Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

    3,096
    3,760
    113
    Make your own trays with 60-holes. This lets you work from one end to the other, moving the cases, as you process them and leaving a gap in between those which have been done, and those that need to be.

    When you work up loads, try to use bulkier powders. They minimize the tendency of the powder to spread out in the case, when it is in the horizontal (firing position), resulting in more consistent ignition, and less spread in the muzzle velocity.
     
    Dallas53 likes this.
  9. 303tom

    303tom Well-Known Member

    7,460
    4,234
    113
    I don't make suggestion or give tips on reloading, to dangerous !.............
     
    Oldoutlaw and Dallas53 like this.
  10. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member Supporter

    16,170
    17,390
    113
    I understand, but this isn't necessarily an instructional on how to reload, or for load recipes. just tips and tricks that make reloading easier and safer, and more organized.
     
    303tom likes this.
  11. 303tom

    303tom Well-Known Member

    7,460
    4,234
    113
    But if I DON'T post anything, tips or other wise, no one can say, well Tom said we could do it like this !........
     
    Dallas53 likes this.
  12. Oldoutlaw

    Oldoutlaw Well-Known Member Supporter

    2,925
    6,134
    103
    I bought my Rockchucker in 1967 or 1968. It is still going strong and never any problem with it.
     
    Rifling82, Jack Ryan and Dallas53 like this.
  13. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member Supporter

    16,170
    17,390
    113
    I understand. that is purely your choice and I have no ill feelings about your choice Tom. as I do respect your opinions and suggestions on many other things.
     
    303tom likes this.
  14. Oldoutlaw

    Oldoutlaw Well-Known Member Supporter

    2,925
    6,134
    103
    I think it best load recommendations are not allowed. There are liabilities involved with doing so. Too many variables there to suit me. I see to many formulas that are not in agreement with the manufacturers Loading Data Manuals.

    I recommend that our Admins review what can or cannot be allowed.
     
    303tom and Dallas53 like this.
  15. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member Supporter

    16,170
    17,390
    113
    I agree with that 110%. like Tom303, I won't list load recipes for others. I may suggest particular powders, or bullets, or primers and cases, and I have always highly recommended consulting SEVERAL load data books that are up to date or current as a means to gather a recipe for a particular load.
     
    303tom and Oldoutlaw like this.
  16. Oldoutlaw

    Oldoutlaw Well-Known Member Supporter

    2,925
    6,134
    103
    Dallas, the problem here is that load receipts are going to appear. It happens on forums all the time even if they are not supposed to give them. Who is going to Moderate those posts? Is it OK with CMG and their Admins to permit load receipts. If not, well, someone has to remove them fast. If approved by CMG, then fine. No action required.
     
    Dallas53 likes this.
  17. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member Supporter

    16,170
    17,390
    113
    whether a forum approves of them or not, from a personal stance and position, I won't give them mine. I will point them to a load data book and let them do their research.

    what I handload, is for my firearms and have been tested in mine, and mine alone and assume all consequences for the results of when I'm shooting mine, with my loads, whether good or bad.
     
    Rifling82 likes this.
  18. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Well-Known Member

    5,102
    1,575
    113
    I look at it this way,If someone uses another persons personal load recipe without doing research as to whether it is safe or not,they are rather stupid and fall into the idiot category to me.

    I've been loading my own ammo for almost 40 years. I've built several wildcat calibers that have no published load data,but I've learned over the years what types of powders and load charges every type of case can shoot and hold.

    Reloading in general is a very safe hobby,but you have to learn and gain knowledge by reading the books that are available about reloading.
    The problem today is that everyone wants instant gratification,and they want someone else to do all the testing for them.

    If someone gets hurt and blows up their firearms by trying to take shortcuts reloading instead of taking the time to learn about what they are doing,they deserve what they get!
     
    Dallas53 likes this.
  19. partdeux

    partdeux Well-Known Member Supporter

    5,921
    2,296
    113
    buy once cry once... LOVE my Dillon 650.

    HOWEVER, it does give you the ability to quickly mfg 100 rounds, where one incident has you questioning the whole group and just makes sense to pull 100 bullets and recover the projectiles and powder.

    Tips
    • even with carbide dies, I still lube 9mm. Found OAL to be more consistent, and then tumble the completed rounds to delube.
    • tumble brass and completed rounds in 1/2 walnut 1/2 corn cob with a touch of polish.
    • Have 12v LED auto light that fits into the center hole on the die plate to really light up the loading stations.
    • deprime and ream primer pockets on all 223 brass picked up. I need to find a way to mark and keep separate my previously reamed brass.
    • Take wire coat hangers and make clips to hold both brass and primer feeders for other cycling purposes.
     
    Rifling82 and Dallas53 like this.
  20. partdeux

    partdeux Well-Known Member Supporter

    5,921
    2,296
    113
    I have one recipe that I absolutely believe the published data to be wrong. Contacted powder mfg and the tech agreed with me, but stood behind their published values. Wildcat, maybe, but my recipe is bounded on both sides by norms, and velocity is exactly as I expected it to be.