Reloading Newbie

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by mpittm2, Oct 27, 2012.

  1. mpittm2

    mpittm2 New Member

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    Hello all and thanks for any advice in advance.

    I am interested in getting into reloading my own ammunition and have a few questions. I am looking to reload 9mm, 5.56/223, and 7.62x39r.

    First off I assume this is a cheaper option for shooting and stocking up on ammo but i have not been able to find any cheap options for bullets. Most cases of 100 in 7.62 and 556 have been around $26 a pop, which doesn't seem cost effective being that i just purchased 1000 rounds of 7.62 for $240 w/shipping. $260 for just bullets not counting rounds, primers, powder, or cost of equipment over time doesn't add up to me. So what am i missing? Is there a website i haven't found? or maybe a bullet type?

    secondly the whole process seems pretty straightforward if not down right easy as long as its done carefully. is this the general consensus?

    Lastly, I found a cheap kit on amazon that seems to have most of everything needed to get started for $298 its a RCBS Rock Chuckler Supreme Master Reloading Kit. It has good reviews on amazon. Is this a good kit or crap?

    Thanks Again and sorry for all of the questions.....
     
  2. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    welcome to the forum. all the calibers listed are some of the cheapest to buy factory loaded. many people don't even reload them because of that. many do though. and many who do reload these cartridges, use a progressive press to do it much more rapidly. a quality progressive press is going to be somewhat more expensive than a quality single stage press.

    now what is your experiance at reloading? if very little or none, do yourself a favor and buy the book, The ABC's Of Reloading. very informative book that will answer lots of your questions about reloading. read it, then reread it several times. reloading isn't rocket science, but needs to be followed in certain steps to be done correctly and safely. reloading if done properly is very safe and rewarding, but if not done so, can have bad or even fatal results.

    many people who do reload these cartridges, buy most of their components in bulk, because of the amount of cartridges they tend to shoot.

    the RCBS equipment is some of the best there is. that's a good price for that kit. it would make a fine starting point for you to begin reloading.
     

  3. AsSeenOnTV

    AsSeenOnTV New Member

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    Last edited: Nov 19, 2012
  4. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    There is no comparison between the spam can ammo and the stuff I load for my Mosin. When I use the surplus stuff it will often lock up the bolt. That is a common problem with the Mosin Nagant. But my handloads cycle as good as any new rifle with top notch ammo. My handloads are much more accurate too. My AR loads are able to shoot groups with all the holes touching each other at 100 yards. From what I understand that is not the case with bargain factory ammo. My AR has never had a factory load in it.
     
  5. AsSeenOnTV

    AsSeenOnTV New Member

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    Last edited: Nov 19, 2012
  6. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    you forgot the other disease of reloading. buying dies you don't even have a firearm for, then having to buy that firearm to justify buying the dies. vicious circle if you ask me!:eek::D
     
  7. TheAlmightyBob

    TheAlmightyBob New Member

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    And then you start picking up brass in calibers you dont own because some day you "may" own that caliber and you'll be way ahead for having it.
     
  8. fupuk

    fupuk New Member

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    Ive started doing that also. Just got my press a few weeks ago but havent opened the box other than to get the reloading manual out and read it. And read the ABC's of reloading a couple times. But im starting out with .38/357 but ive found myself picking up .45 casings when im at the range because i know sooner than later i will have a .45, its wierd how i look at brass now. Looks a lot like money. Ive been keeping my casings to my revolvers for about a year and have a bunch. But my 9mm i never picked them up but now i wished i would have..
     
  9. mpittm2

    mpittm2 New Member

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    thanks for all of the advice! i think i'm going to jump in. I'm going to get the ABCs of reloading and get to reading that asap and start working on getting my equipment together.

    to AsSeenOnTV i have no idea about the difference of the two primers u mentioned please enlighten me.

    also i found some great prices on brass and bullets athttp://www.evergladesammo.com/brass.html

    Would any care to put together a list of general things I'll need to get started that might not be obvious to a beginer?

    thanks again
     
  10. TheAlmightyBob

    TheAlmightyBob New Member

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    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hth3Xwoqe9M[/ame]

    Google/ youtube are your friends.
     
  11. sdiver35

    sdiver35 New Member

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    I've been reloading for about 5 months and don't reload 9mm, yet. I have probably 3,000 pcs of 9mm brass though since I don't discriminate when picking up brass at the range. It is all cleaned, but not sized or de-primed. I am on the fence about buying dies for it though.

    To the OP, good luck and be safe!!
     
  12. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    buy the book first. read it, then reread it several times. they go into much detail about what is absolutely needed to start reloading. read the book and it will put a lot into perspective and answer many of your questions.

    Sdiver, even if you never reload that 9mm brass, hang onto to it because someone else might. could always be used for trading with another guy who reloads.
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2012
  13. AsSeenOnTV

    AsSeenOnTV New Member

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    Last edited: Nov 19, 2012
  14. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    i agree withis 100%! check and double check powder charges. much more critical on pistol cases than rifle cases due to the amount of powder used. i charge mine on a loading block and visually inspect before seating the bullets.
     
  15. AsSeenOnTV

    AsSeenOnTV New Member

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    Last edited: Nov 19, 2012
  16. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    One word of caution. Range pick up 9mm is often Glock fired. The Glock's unsupported chamber allows the brass to bulge near the base. A traditional sizing die will not correct this. You need to run it through a special die. I have a Magma Case Master that resizes from the rim to the mouth. I run all 9, .357 Sig, .40, 10mm, and .45 cases through this machine before loading to insure they are completely w/in specs.
     
  17. Gabby

    Gabby New Member

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    There are 2 basic types of primers: boxer and berdan. Boxer primers have an anvil built into the primer and cases for boxer primers have a single flash hole located in the center of the primer pocket. These are much easier to reload than berdan primed cases.

    Berdan primed cases have the anvil as an integral part of the case and can be identified by the double flash holes in the primer pocket. While these cases CAN be reloaded, I don't know anyone who does so. It just isn't practical.

    Look down the mouth of a fired cartridge. You may need to shine a light in for bottle necked rifle cases. If there is a single hole located in the center at the bottom it is a boxer case and is probably reloadable. An exception would be a steel case for which reloading is generally not recommended. If there are two smaller holes about half way between the center of the case's bottom and the outer edge, it is a berdan case and reloading is not practical.
     
  18. mpittm2

    mpittm2 New Member

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    Alright well I got the abc's of reloading and have been reading it for the last couple of days. I have to admit I've been having periods of holy **** my brain hurts shortly followed by ok this seams pretty doable. Lol
    That said I think I/we (my father and I) are going to jump in. A friend of his suggested the Dillon XL650 ,and after reading the thread about which press is for me, I think that will be the one we'll go with. Any objections? Comments? Concerns?
     
  19. Shade

    Shade New Member

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    SHHHHHHH!!!!! Don't Scare 'em!!!

    Dillon makes a great press, You will still want a single stage press, I also
    suggest working up your first few hundred rounds on a single stage press;
    take a look at Lee's Classic Cast Press.

    www.fsreloading.com

    I have a mix of RCBS, Lee and MEC equipement with others sprinkled in
    here and there. Saving my pennies for a Dillon or two.

    Bulk 5.56 can often be found for under $0.10 a bullet. That is how I buy 'em.
     
  20. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    i have to agree with Shade that starting with a single stage press is much better for a beginner. allows you to concentrate on the steps and learn procedures.