Reloading Issue - 7mm SAUM Ammo

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Wxstorm, Jan 26, 2010.

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  1. Wxstorm

    Wxstorm New Member

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    I am new to reloading, and am still working on perfecting the process. Well, I prepared my first 20-round lot of reloaded 7mm Remington Short-Action Ultra Magnum (7mm SAUM) ammo and went out to the range a couple of weekends ago with my Remington Model Seven rifle and a box of factory ammo.

    I fired the Model Seven with the factory ammo with no problems, and a nice, tight shot group at 50 yards. When I went to fire a couple of reloads, I noticed they ended up several inches below the target. When I fired the third reloaded round I noticed a very slight delay between the firing pin striking the primer and the round firing. This phenomenon did not occur when I fired another factory round, so I concluded it was a problem with my reloads.

    Here's the data for the reloads I was using:
    Primer: CCI-200 Large Rifle Primer
    Powder: Hodgdon H414, 54 Grains
    Bullet: Hornady 150 Grain SST

    Greatly appreciate any help! Thanks.
     
  2. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    When your primer is seated all the way it will be slightly recessed in the case head. Not a lot but just enough to catch your finger nail on.

    The reason for the low shot is that your factory load is loaded hotter than your reloads which are on the very bottom of the reloading scale. I show 54 to 56 gr of H414 I would start at 54.6gr and work up from there by .2gr incraments to 55.6 gr. Remington 150gr factory load is running 3110 FPS your load is clocking 2885 fps that is almost 300 fps difference that is a lot.

    If your primer is not seated all the way it can cause many problems.

    What manual are you using for load data?
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2010

  3. Wxstorm

    Wxstorm New Member

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    Thanks for the information. I was using the Speer Reloading Manual #14, which doesn't contain exact information for the components I'm using, so I had to estimate. I found some more information on the Web that helped me narrow down my estimate on the powder amount to 54 grains for the 150 grain SST bullets I used.

    Will double-check to see if I'm seating the primers far enough into the casing when I prepare my next lot of reloads.
     
  4. The_Kid

    The_Kid New Member

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    I use H414 for my Hornady 190gr SPBTs. When I was working up a load, a few of my cartridges that were on the low end of the spectrum, "hang fired". That is what you're describing, a "hang fire." But I'm willing to go out on a limb here and say your primer fired without a hitch, it was your powder that "hung," as it were.

    I remember reading where someone was having a hang fire problem, their solution was to use more powder; as in your case, they were using too little powder. I went with more powder and haven't had a reoccurrence.

    It seems that both of your problems can be fixed with one solution.

    Also... H414 is spherical powder, which I was told is harder to ignite. Seeing you are loading for an ultra magnum cartridge, you really should be using a magnum primer. My Hornady handbook specifies a "Remington 9 1/2 Magnum" primer.

    I hope you get it sorted out.

    Stay safe!
     
  5. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    Good advice Kid thank you. I haven't loaded for mags or short mags and I was wondering if he should have been using a mag primer. I didn't have a load book handy either...
     
  6. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Spherical or ball powders are harder to ignite than stick powders. Cold temps make the powder harder to ignite. If you are shooting outdoors in the winter or the ammo was stored in the cold car, it will hangfire.

    A magnum primer can cure both issues. A cartridge with the kind of capacity the SAUM has pretty much "requires" a Magnum primer.

    You will generally not get the best accuracy with a magnum primer. There is such a thing as a Magnum Match primer, but they are very hard to find right now.