reloading equipment

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by DavidB, Jul 27, 2013.

  1. DavidB

    DavidB New Member

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    About 18 months ago i started buying reloading equipment. Started with a Dillon 550b, then some caliber conversion kits, redding competition dies, scale, calipers, primers, powder, and of corse reloading books. Today is the first i've looked at it since I bought it all and its still all unopened. I thought I really wanted to get into reloading but apparently I have no time for it. Do any of you think I should hang onto this stuff or try to sell it and get some of my money back? The wife is pushing for it to go, I kinda want to keep it since I have it and we're not hurting for money...but it just sits in a pile and I don't know if or when I'll ever get around to setting it up or using it. Will I loose money by selling it? Thanks for the advice.
     
  2. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    David- we do not often have as generous a giveaway offer as this............


    Just kidding!


    Give this some thought before you do anything- like- what are the other things that eat up your time? At one time you wanted to get into this- does that still apply?


    Will you lose money? Unless you got a real steal when you bought it, yes, you will. Since folks WILL be looking at new prices, even tho yours is still "NIB". And the panic period for the ammo shortage is starting to subside.
     

  3. shadecorp

    shadecorp Active Member Supporter

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    Keep it.
    Or send it to me.
    Store it someplace.
    Never know when you will want put it to work.
    Keep it.
     
  4. kaido

    kaido New Member

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    Pending on the type caliber of dyes you've got, I'll buy them off of you at a reasonable price.....being serious here. Haha
     
  5. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    It is a great hobby. To me it is second only to shooting itself. There is also a very satisfying feeling when you shoot a great group with ammo that you made yourself. If it was me I would open it up and get started. What is your favorite gun? Do you have brass for it? Even if you are just getting started and taking your time. You can make a box of just about anything in an hour or so. It is just the set up that is time consuming.

    With a progressive you can load hundreds of rounds an hour once you know what you are doing.
     
  6. 25-5

    25-5 New Member

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    I started reloading forty years ago. Did a lot of IPSC competition. Life intervened. All job, no play. My Dillon 450 just gathered dust. Time passed then I was at it again. Got upgrades from Dillon. More firearms. My wife wants me to be happy and I am. Just miss getting primers! :mad:
    Don't make a rash decision.
     
  7. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    I'll just say Dillon Precision makes really good stuff.

    Maybe if you started a couple first steps, like

    cleaning, depriming/sizing, and re-organizing

    brass. When it is all in a big pile, getting started

    looks intimidating.
     
  8. DavidB

    DavidB New Member

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    I admit I'm a little intimidated with the setup, and I know I don't have everything I need to get started like a tumbler and media. Between my job and my family, I don't feel like I have enough time.
     
  9. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    I agree that you should put some thought into it before selling. You will almost definitely lose money.

    Is your wife into shooting? If so, get your press setup, make a box of ammo, and show her how accurate it is, or how much of a value it is once the ammo you've made has paid for the cost of the press. Might take some time, but it would be very easy to show her some math about how many rounds you need to make to pay for the cost of the press. Once that's happened, its pure profit (in the form of ammo), in a sense.

    The key is getting your wife on board in some way.

    I bet there will come a day where if you sell it, you'll regret it.

    I have a wife and a small daughter. My wife is pregnant with a son. We have four dogs, also. My family and my job also take up a lot of time. I still find time to reload, and I love it. I put a used recliner out in the garage, so when I reload after my daughter is asleep my wife can sit out there and talk with me while I reload.

    The wife being involved is key.
     
  10. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    I think you need to make a decision here quick. If you decide to sell you will lose money, but I anticipate that there will be a flood of reloading equipment for sale by people who have done just what you did since Sandy Hook. Prices will fall like a rock when that happens. I would take one of the members here up on an offer to buy. (I have the 550 myself. It is an excellent machine)

    If you decide to keep it then get off the dime and get set up. Hopefully you can find the components though.
     
  11. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    By the way, what calibers do you have for it?
     
  12. DavidB

    DavidB New Member

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    Right now I only have .223 dies. I shoot my AR the most so I figured that was the way to go, but looking back I should have opted for 44mag or 45acp dies.
     
  13. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    If you have a 44 mag that machine will pay for itself fast! Dies are cheap. You can buy a set of dies for less than a box of ammo! I can reload a box of 44mag for $5. Yea, that's right...I said $5. I pour lead to make my own bullets. But that last time I saw a box of 44 mag it was running around $40 for a box of 50! I will be shooting a 44 mag at IDPA a week from today. That ammo would cost me over $100. But I will spend $15. I can reload a box of 44 mag in 30 minutes. That is like paying myself $70 an hour to do something I enjoy.
     
  14. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    If you would take the time to load one round of ammo you would not sell out. :)
     
  15. Wouva1

    Wouva1 New Member

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    From the day I started reloading ammo,which mind you wasn't that long ago at all I have not bought a single box of factory rounds for .308 which I can tell you ain't cheap here is AUS...box of 20 federal power-shok 180gr use to cost me $33.00 bucks in which I consider a total rip off...today I reload 165gr sierra gamekings and consistently shoot bullseyes at 200 yards and my equipment is already paying for itself,so do yourself a favour and hold on to what you've got otherwise you might just regret it......cheers
     
  16. DavidB

    DavidB New Member

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    I bought my equipment because of the prices of ammo, specifically 45-70 and 44 mag. I don't think I've shot either in over 2 years because of the cost. Maybe I will hang onto it, are their any classes offered that teach reloading? The guy and my local reloading supply is a arrogant prick, and I don't know anyone that reloads. I've watched every video imaginable on YouTube. Thanks for convincing me to keep it, now to get comfortable using it...
     
  17. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    Yes, the NRA offers courses:

    http://www.nrainstructors.org/searchcourse.aspx

    The one you're looking for is entitled: "NRA Basic Metallic Cartridge Reloading Course"
     
  18. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    But that doesn't mean there are any offered in your area... :/
     
  19. kaido

    kaido New Member

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    If the NRA class isn't offered in your area, I wouldn't sweat it. I watched a couple videos and read the reloading manual, it's really all you'd need. Far as I'm concerned its almost as simple as it sounds. Clean brass if not already done, deprime/resize, check to see if it needs trimming (manual should give max case length), reprime, add proper amount of powder (manual gives safe range), add bullet of choice on top of powder.

    The biggest thing to watch is going to be the measurements of the different parts, but once you see the little diagram on the first page for your cartridge, you'll see how simple it really is. If you're still confused or just want to double check anything, feel free to ask. None of us will judge since we've all been in your shoes already. If one of us can't help answer your question(s)' then I'm sure one of the other *insert large number* of people will be able to.
     
  20. jebsca

    jebsca New Member

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    Kaido has is about right. Read a few books a few times and maybe look at youtube and read a few threads on here and ask a few questions. When I was thinking about getting into reloading, I looked at the reloading section here and found some very good threads that will point you in the right direction. They will tell you to get some books like the ABCs of reloading. I got that book and Reloading for Handgunners before I got any equipment. I have also picked up Lee and Hornady's reloading manuals and find all four of them to be helpful and I will look things up in each one. I would say as you plan to keep your equipment, start reading. It will help you to know better how to set up your bench, be it a 400 ft^2 room with all of the toys a man can dream up or working out of a shoe box. One last thing. The ammo shortage that we have been seeing has hit the reloaders too. It may take you some time before you can get all of the components that you are looking for.
    Good luck, and stay safe.