reloading equipment location

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by hmh, Feb 22, 2012.

  1. hmh

    hmh New Member

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    I just got a good size shed that is dry but not climate controlled. I have been leary about moving my reloading equipment and supplies out to it. All of my powder and primers are sealed in ammo cans with desacent. I am worried about moisture when actually reloading and the equipment rusting. Looking for some advice. So what do you think?
     

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  2. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    hmh, i do all my reloading in a 10x14 portable building i bought for just this purpose. it too isn't climate controlled and after a year now have had no issues with moisture. i live in East Texas, so we have our fair share of humidity and moisture. i just keep my powder in the original containers and screwed on tight. if humidity is an issue, a light spray of oil would keep any surface rust from forming. i don't think you should have any problems moving into the shed, and you will come up with more things to fill the space, just as i have!
     

  3. hmh

    hmh New Member

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    Never have a problem filling space. What about the powder measure keeping it rust free. And thanks
     
  4. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    not sure, mine is just mounted to the top of the bench and i haven't had any rusting issues as of yet. i guess you could cover it with a plastic bag of some sort when not being used. i do use my reloading equipment on a regular basis, so that might make the difference. there have been times, that i wasn't able to reload for at least a montth or so, and still haven't had any type of rust yet.
     
  5. hmh

    hmh New Member

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    I guess I will have to reload more darn. I live in tn so with the humidity should I tell the wife I need to reload every week. Seriously is there any rust inhibitor that would be ok on the powder measure. And seriously I do need to reload more often. Thanks
     
  6. hiwall

    hiwall Active Member

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    isn't your powder measure aluminum?
     
  7. hmh

    hmh New Member

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    No the cylinder (I think that is what it is called) is steel. The rest of it might be aluminum.
     
  8. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    I've been reloading in an outdoor building for many years.The only things that will form surface rust on them are the outer surface of your dies,or anything else that is touched by your bare hands.
    A little surface rust on the outside of your dies doesn't hurt a thing.You can take it off with some tranny fluid and steel wool,if it bothers you.

    My primers are on a shelf -never had any problems,and I have close to 90lbs of powder on some other shelves-no problems.

    As long as everything has lids,and is boxed up,it'll stay just fine.

    This is about as rusty as the dies will get,if you use them a lot like I do.
    [​IMG]
     
  9. hmh

    hmh New Member

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    Like your die holders where did you get the aluminum insert?
     
  10. rjd3282

    rjd3282 New Member

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    The only thing I've ever seen rust on was my Lee dies and it was just on the outside.
     
  11. noylj

    noylj Member

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    I think your equipment needs to be straightened up. I have no idea how you use it on its side.
    I found that in CA and AZ, rust wasn't an issue. My son, however, in northern CA, found that rust is an issue.
    Right now, I do all my reloading in the house and all the dirty jobs (case cleaning and gun cleaning) in the house as I am tired of reloading, freezing in the winter and sweating in the summer.
    If you keep a light coat of oil on the press (and leave it covered by a sheet) and leave the dies in a box with DESICCANT, you will have no problems.
    Rusty dies, actually, are seldom a problem. I have a couple and the rust is on the outside and the inside contact surfaces are rust free even after over 40 years of use. I really think the burnishing of the working surfaces and residual oils keep the working surfaces rust free.
    If you worry, then move the clean reloading activities inside where you can maintain 55-90°F temperatures and 0-80% RH.
     
  12. hmh

    hmh New Member

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    My whole house is sideways so it works out. I live in west tn so wondering how much humidity will get in during reloading. Storing is in original containers in ammo cans with silicone desiccant.