RELOADING....confused

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Wouva1, Jul 1, 2013.

  1. Wouva1

    Wouva1 New Member

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    I'm a little confused in regards to what's what in regards to OAL for loading 308 168 gr sierra,the question I have is that one book being the Lyman states the seating depth to be 2.775 where as the Richard lee book states 2.800 ,my question is which one is right or it doesn't matter....I'm only new to reloading and am trying to figure things out before commencing my first loads....please check out photos as I will be using IMR-4064.....cheers

    image-3625804755.jpg
     
  2. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    Can't really see the pics. What is your maximum oal?
    Both books could be correct assuming everything is withing the tolerances. Your best bet is to aim for the middle ground.
     

  3. Wouva1

    Wouva1 New Member

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    From what I gather the .308 win cartridge has a max length of 2.800 and like I said Lyman states seating depth to be 2.775 and the Lee states 2.800,so if I was to keep it in between those two figures I should be right...am I right in saying this or I'm wrong....cheers
     
  4. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    Set it up to the tallest one, load one shell, and then put it in your rifle and see if it chambers and isn't tight to close the bolt. You can color the brass with a sharpie to see if the lans scratch the bullet. if there are marks, seat the bullet down an 8th of a turn, until the marks go away.???
     
  5. Wouva1

    Wouva1 New Member

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    Sorry I have made a mistake,max length is 2.810 for .308
     
  6. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Wouva,

    Nothing to worry about. You are only dealing with .025 which is a difference of only 1/40th of an inch between the two. I would suggest doing as Anna has advised go with the longer. But Lyman is also noted for their quality loading manual as well. You should be fine and if they shoot well just fine tune the powder for ultimate accuracy. Depending on the rifle you are shooting you should get 1/2 or under 1 MOA groups at 100 Yards with it with no problem. If not back the bullet up the .025 to 2.775. I think it will shoot well either way.

    03
     
  7. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    You can do the sharpie to several bullets, seating each one and checking for marks. once you have the desired seating depth, go ahead and reseat the previous ones to the new desired depth to make them all consistent.

    In any given rifle, there are variances in chamber seating depth. Find what your chamber is with the sharpie method and make that your measurement :)
     
  8. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    another thing to consider is the max OAL is many times in regard to the magazine length.

    a lot of reloaders looking for some additional accuracy will shallow seat their bullets, which sometime makes them too long to load into the magazine, and will shoot them like a single shot.
     
  9. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Correction with new specifications .035 difference = 35/1000 of an inch. Still should be no problem but it is not going to cause any situations to be concerned with. If so back it off. Honestly at this point I would try the 2.775 first.

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  10. Wouva1

    Wouva1 New Member

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    If I was to use the sharpie method would I need to full length size the cartridge first and trim to length or gently seat the bullet into the fire formed brass to find the lands...sorry if some of my questions sound a bit dumb....cheers
     
  11. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    Full length or neck size is no concern as long as you when neck sizing them the brass is from YOUR rifle. Then trim them, debur them before seating. Then start out at the maximum suggested seating depth and inspect for fine lans marking on the bullet. If they are there, then adjust slowly in increments until the marks are gone, and wah lah!

    No such thing as dumb questions :)
    So ask away
     
  12. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    yes, this is refered to as shallow seating the bullets. many reloaders will make a dummy case to set this measurement. i resize a case, recap it with a spent primer, trim it to length, deburr the case and then very gently seat the desired bullet in very shallow, then paint the bullet with a sharpie and let it dry and then place it in the rifle an very gently chamber it and then very gently extract it. then observe for rifling marks. if it has them, then seat it back with yourseating die about .050 and then recoat the bullet, let it dry and repeat. when you have no marks on the bullet, you're at you max OAL length for your chamber.
     
  13. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    And most definitely use lube when sizing them. ;)
     
  14. Rocky7

    Rocky7 New Member

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    Anna and Axe are giving you good advice. I find that if I pinch the neck a bit with pliers before starting a bullet into the brass, it'll make a more visible scratch. A jeweller's eyepiece is very handy in this as the bullet will often pull back a bit when you pull the bolt back and sometimes will even stick in the lands and need to be tapped back with a cleaning rod to knock it out. No matter if you can lay your hands on a cheap jeweller's eyepiece; you'll be able to insert that bullet back by hand to exactly the end of the scratch mark in the sharpie colouring you made.

    Personally, I wouldn't get too fixated on the reloading manual number; all rifles are different and its better to figure out the OAL of your particular rifle with a particular bullet and you can then use that number in experimenting to find what a firearm likes.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2013
  15. Wouva1

    Wouva1 New Member

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    WOW....thanks very much everyone for the responses to my problem,this is truly a great forum and a great place to learn....my questions have been answered and will be reloading as we speak.....I'll be heading to the range tomorrow to see how I go and will post my results as soon as in finished...fingers and toes crossed....once again thanks for the great help.....cheers
     
  16. gunnut07

    gunnut07 New Member

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    This is why I use the Stony Point cartridge OAL. Now the Hornady LNL case gauge.


    Not that any of the info given so far is wrong. Everyone is pointing you in the perfect Due north direction.
     
  17. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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  18. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    A tight fitting closure is not always an indication of OAL resistance. The tight closure can be do to neck thickness. Neck thickness is the real danger for erratic and high C.U.P. damage.
    Triming a case neck is only half of the correction. The forward brass flow does not only increase length but crates an uneven thickness of the neck dimension. The bullet is held past the proper breaking point like a stuck valve. This results in blown primers and damaged bolt faces.
    Make sure you check the proper seated neck dimension around the neck. The necks should have the ODs turned after triming to proper length. The brass if properly annealed will give a longer and more accurate life.:)
     
  19. kingrider

    kingrider New Member

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    The methods described earlier will certainly work but the hornady gauge sure makes it easier. Before I bought the gauge, I used to take a resized case and make two cuts about halfway down be case neck. Take a bullet and start It in the case, as gently as possible chamber and extract the case. Worked like a charm. Another method that I used a good bit was just like the magi market thing, but I used smoke from a candle.
     
  20. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    Pick one manual and put the other one away once you decide. Either one will be fine. I would recommend doing some testing with your rifle and see what works best (meaning load several rounds from each manual, check how they perform in your rifle, and use the one that gives you the best accuracy). Figuring out exactly what your particular rifle "likes" is one of the things that make reloading challenging. Some rifles like to have a bit of "jump" to the lands for instance.

    When checking your chamber and all with the Sharpie, use dummy rounds without primer or powder in them. Other than that detail all other advice here is sound.